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Showing 1 - 200 of 356 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access  
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access  
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access  
Heart Views     Open Access  
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access  
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)

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Journal Cover Annals of Bioanthropology
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2315-7992
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [356 journals]
  • Regenerative effects of aqueous extract of Adansonia digitata fruit pulp
           on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced oxidative damages in testes of male
           Wistar rats

    • Authors: Oyetunji Adeoye Oyewopo, Ade Steven Alabi, Aminu Imam, Gabriel Godson Akunna
      Pages: 65 - 70
      Abstract: Oyetunji Adeoye Oyewopo, Ade Steven Alabi, Aminu Imam, Gabriel Godson Akunna
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):65-70
      Introduction: Adansonia digitata (AD) is a multipurpose tree species widely used for food and non-food products and medicine. Every part of the baobab tree is reported to be useful. However, exposure to high concentrations of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) (including vapor) had been reported to be injurious to human health. Aim: The present study investigated the effects of AD fruit pulp extracts on CCl4-induced testicular toxicity. Materials and Method: Twenty (20) adult male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (A, B, C, and D) with five rats in each group. Group A received distilled water, group B received a single oral dose of CCl4(2.5 mL/kg) for two days, group C received 500 mg/kg body weight aqueous extract of Adansonia, and group D received 2.5 mL/kg of CCl4for two days followed by 500 mg/kg body weight Adansonia aqueous extracts for 14 days. The animals were autopsied 3 weeks after CCl4and AD extracts injection. Results: Result showed that CCl4induced oxidative damage in testes and decreased the hormonal level of testosterone (TT). AD extracts normalized the testicular damages caused by CCl4. Pretreatment with AD ameliorated the testicular content of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Similarly, AD treatment attenuated the CCl4-induced increase in hormonal level. In conclusion, AD ameliorated and protected the testes against CCl4-induced oxidative damages and deranged sperm characteristics in adult Wistar rats.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):65-70
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2315-7992.204684
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Study of the cranial (cephalic) and facial (prosopic) indexes of Ukwuani
           indigenes in Nigeria

    • Authors: Ugochukwuka Ojieh, Mamerhi Enaohwo, Abimbola Ebeye
      Pages: 71 - 74
      Abstract: Ugochukwuka Ojieh, Mamerhi Enaohwo, Abimbola Ebeye
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):71-74
      Background: It is noted that the head and face shapes of humans from different ethnic groups vary markedly. The cause of these variations has been attributed to several environmental factors. Measurements of these indexes become a necessity to prove that individuals from a particular ethnic group have similar head and face forms. Aim: The present study was aimed at measuring the cephalic and prosopic indexes of Ukwuani indigenes of Delta State. Materials and Method: A total of 315 subjects (165 males and 150 females) were selected by simple random sampling and were measured for their cranial and facial lengths and breath and the respective indexess were calculated. Results: Males had a mean prosopic index of 99.15 whereas females had a marginally lower mean prosopic index of 94.54, both belonged to the hyperleptoprosopic facial group and observed differences between both genders were statistically not significant (P = 0.25) The mean cranial index in males and females was 80.21 and 79.04, respectively, both belonged to the mesocephalic cranial group and observed differences between both genders were statistically significant (P = 0.01). Conclusion: There was no statistically significant gender difference with regards to prosopic index but with regards to cephalic index the observed gender difference was statistically significant.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):71-74
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2315-7992.204686
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Prevalence of simian, Suwon, and Sydney creases in acquired idiopathic
           blindness in some selected schools for the blind in Nigeria

    • Authors: John Nwolim Paul, EA Osunwoke, CW Paul
      Pages: 75 - 78
      Abstract: John Nwolim Paul, EA Osunwoke, CW Paul
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):75-78
      Background: The study of palmar flexion creases such as simian, Suwon, and Sydney creases is important since they have strong medical implications. Aim: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of simian, Suwon, and Sydney creases in acquired idiopathic blindness. Materials and Methods: A total of 72 (36 blind and 36 nonblind) participants were recruited for the study that comprised 22 blind male and 14 blind female participants, 18 male and 18 female nonblind participants. The sampling technique used was convenience purposive sampling. Fingerprints and toeprints were obtained using print. Results: The prevalence of palmar creases in blind and nonblind male and female participants showed that the blind participants had 0% prevalence of simian crease, 3.8% prevalence of Suwon, and 0.6% prevalence of Sydney crease, whereas the nonblind participants have 0% prevalence of the creases. In the female blind participants, there was 0% prevalence of simian crease, 1.2% prevalence of Suwon, and 0.6% prevalence of Sydney crease, whereas the nonblind participants have 0% prevalence of the creases. The total prevalence of palmar creases of the blind and nonblind participants was shown, and the simian crease had 0.0% prevalence in the blind and in the nonblind participants. Suwon crease had 2.8% prevalence in the blind and 0.8% in the nonblind participants. Sydney crease had 0.6% prevalence in the blind, but 0.0% prevalence in the nonblind participants. Comparison of the prevalence of the Suwon and Sydney creases in the blind and nonblind was shown to be statistically nonsignificant (P > 0.05), whereas it was significant for simian crease on comparison with the blind and nonblind (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The study has shown that there is no significant difference in the prevalence of Suwon and Sydney crease (P < 0.05), whereas there is a significant difference in the simian crease between the blind and nonblind compared. This study has provided information on the prevalence of palmar creases in people with idiopathic blindness and the nonblind people in Nigeria and by extension the Sub-Saharan Africa.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):75-78
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2315-7992.204679
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Comparative assessment on the prevalence of cusp of Carabelli among three
           different populations in India

    • Authors: Gayathri Ramesh, Ramesh Nagarajappa, Shitalkumar Sagari, Gundareddy Nagendrareddy Suma
      Pages: 79 - 83
      Abstract: Gayathri Ramesh, Ramesh Nagarajappa, Shitalkumar Sagari, Gundareddy Nagendrareddy Suma
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):79-83
      Background: The characteristics of a tooth can differ among races and species and can constantly alter due to natural selection and the genetic changes. Therefore, the study of the morphological properties of the dental structures could aid in phylogenic and genetic studies including gathering information about intra- and inter-species variations. Objectives: To assess and compare the prevalence of cusp of Carabelli among three different Indian (Rajasthan, Gujarat, and Karnataka) populations. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 casts (50% each of males and females) were evaluated for the presence or absence of Carabelli trait among the study population according to the scale of Dahlberg's (1963) scale. Casts of participants having maxillary first permanent molars bilaterally without gross damage to morphology by caries, attrition, or any other trauma were included in the study. Chi-square test with a significance level of P< 0.05 was used for statistical analysis. Results: The overall prevalence of Carabelli cusps was 57% (61% in males and 53% in females). The various groups showed a prevalence of 58.7%, 50%, and 61.7% in Rajasthan, Gujarat, and Karnataka population, respectively. The differences in the observations between groups and also gender were statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). The small vertical ridge and groove form were observed most commonly (31%), and small pit with minor grooves diverging from a depression form was the least prevalent (1.5%). Conclusions: The findings on the maxillary first permanent molar demonstrate that there was no significant difference in the prevalence of Carabelli cusps among the study populations.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):79-83
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2315-7992.204688
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Murine's lateral frontal cortical histomorphology and its behavior
           after caffeine administration

    • Authors: Moses Bassey Ekong, Eno-Obong Henrietta Akpan, Agnes Akudo Nwakanma
      Pages: 84 - 89
      Abstract: Moses Bassey Ekong, Eno-Obong Henrietta Akpan, Agnes Akudo Nwakanma
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):84-89
      Introduction: Caffeine is a Psychostimulant consumed as natural components in chocolates, coffees and teas, and as added components to soda, energy drinks, and some drugs. It has been reported to impair the brain in several ways that might lead to activity breakdown. Aim: The present study therefore investigated the potency of caffeine on the neurobehavior and histomorphology of the frontal cortex of a murine model. Materials and Methods: Thirty albino mice were divided into five groups (n = 6), administered intraperitoneally 0.2 ml distilled water, 25, 30, 40 and 60 mg/kg body weight (bw) of caffeine, respectively for 14 days, while the bws were measured prior and after the experiment. On day 15, the dark and light field behavioral test was carried out and the animals were sacrificed by, perfusion method, and the frontal cortices excised from whole brains and routinely processed for histological studies. Results: The mice gained bw in the 25 and 30 mg/kg bw caffeine groups, but lost weight in the 40 and 60 mg/kg bw caffeine groups. No difference was observed in the entire light and dark field test parameters, while histological studies showed significant (P < 0.05) hyperplasia of the frontal cortical cells in the caffeine test groups, all compared with the control and among the test groups. Conclusion: Consumption of the given low dose of caffeine, caused gain in weight while high dose of caffeine caused bw loss, but did not affect the dark and light field behavioral parameters, but stimulated frontal cortical cell hyperplasia possibly as a protective measure.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):84-89
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2315-7992.204682
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Sexual dimorphism in hand grip strength and hand dimensions among Hausas

    • Authors: Kabiru B Umar, Barnabas Danborno, Kolawale V Olorunshola, Lawan H Adamu
      Pages: 90 - 95
      Abstract: Kabiru B Umar, Barnabas Danborno, Kolawale V Olorunshola, Lawan H Adamu
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):90-95
      Background: Handgrip strength (HGS) is an anthropometric variable that is affected by a number of factors including age, gender, and body size. Aim: This study was designed to determine the gender differences in HGS and hand dimensions of secondary schools students in Kano metropolis. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study carried out on Hausas of Kano Metropolitan. Seven hundred and ten (340 males and 370 females) participated in the study. The hand dimensions were measured using digital vernier caliper. The HGS of right and left hands were measured using a standard adjustable digital hand grip dynamometer at sitting position. Descriptive statistics (mean ± standard deviation) was used to express the data. Independent sample t-test was used to find differences. Statistical significance was declared at P< 0.05. Data were analyzed using SPSS (IMB, Corporation, NY, USA) version 20. Results: A significant difference was observed among 17–18 and 19–20 age groups in the right-handed female participants with no such differences in the left-handed female participants. For 17–18 aged groups, the significant difference exists between the sexes in HGS and hand dimensions. In 19–20 age groups, similar pattern of significant difference was noticed in HGS and hand dimensions. Conclusion: It was concluded that function of HGS is the function of good hand dimension and body variable and vice versa. Age provided to be a factor that may influence the grip strength and hand dimension among Hausas.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):90-95
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2315-7992.204687
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • The study of nutritional status and academic performance of primary school
           children in Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria

    • Authors: Florence Opoola, Samuel Sunday Adebisi, Augustine Oseloka Ibegbu
      Pages: 96 - 100
      Abstract: Florence Opoola, Samuel Sunday Adebisi, Augustine Oseloka Ibegbu
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):96-100
      Aim: The present study was carried out to assess the relationship between nutritional status and academic performance of primary school children in Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: School children from primary 3 to 6 were enrolled for the study and they were selected from three randomly selected primary schools within Zaria in Kaduna State, Nigeria. A total of 759 pupils made up of 385 girls and 374 boys were assessed. Ethical clearance was obtained from Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, and self-administered questionnaires were completed by the parents or guardians of the children. Body anthropometrics such as height, weight, and mid-upper arm circumference were measured using a stadiometer and a measuring tape from which the body mass index (BMI) was calculated. The nutritional status of the children was determined using the Centre for Disease Control standard for BMI percentile, while the academic performance of the children was determined by finding the mean of five subjects taken during term examination. Results: The results of the present study showed that overweight children performed better academically when compared to the other children with a mean academic score of 66.19 ± 17.00; underweight was observed to be more prevalent among the males than the females, while on the other hand, overweight was more prominent in females than males. Conclusion: The present study showed that a high percentage of the population has healthy weight, while only a small proportion was obese. This could be a result of imbalance in the food intake of the population, and from the results, it was observed that the total number of children who were overweight performed better academically than the others, which could mean that the children who were well fed and well nourished tend to do better academically than those who are not.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):96-100
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2315-7992.204680
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Ultrasonographic assessment of normal prostate volume and splenic length
           among Urhobo ethnic group in Delta State of Nigeria

    • Authors: Abimbola Oladuni Ebeye, John Chukwuma Oyem, Banjo Emmanuel Iweariulor, Stanley Chukwuemeka Ubah
      Pages: 101 - 104
      Abstract: Abimbola Oladuni Ebeye, John Chukwuma Oyem, Banjo Emmanuel Iweariulor, Stanley Chukwuemeka Ubah
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):101-104
      Introduction: Utrasonographic imaging has been demonstrated as the fastest and safest modality in the evaluation of localized diseases in the spleen and prostate gland. Aim: This study was aimed at assessing the splenic length and prostate volume dimensions of the Urhobos with the use of ultrasound. Materials and Methods: 317 healthy Urhobo subjects aged between 18 - 60 years at the radiology department of Central Hospital Warri and Capitol Hill Hospital Oleh, Delta state were used for this study. Splenic length and prostate volume were ascertained using a Sonoace 1500 ultrasound machine according to standard radiologic technique. Data obtained were subjected to Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 20) and were analysed using Pearson's correlation at a probability of 0.01 % (99% confidence limit). Results: It showed a higher splenic length in males compared to females and also recorded an increase in prostate volume with increasing age. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated no gender differences in splenic length dimensions and has also revealed a positive correlation between age and prostate volume in the Urhobos.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):101-104
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2315-7992.204681
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Sex differences in facial asymmetry indices among Hausa ethnic group of
           Nigeria

    • Authors: Lawan Hassan Adamu, Samuel Adeniyi Ojo, Barnabas Danborno, Samuel Sunday Adebisi, Magaji Garba Taura
      Pages: 105 - 110
      Abstract: Lawan Hassan Adamu, Samuel Adeniyi Ojo, Barnabas Danborno, Samuel Sunday Adebisi, Magaji Garba Taura
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):105-110
      Background: Evaluation of facial symmetry in a given population may help in understanding the level of environmental stress exposed by the population. Within the same population, males and females may respond differently to environmental stressors, which can be manifested as deviation from perfect symmetry. Objectives: The study seeks to investigate the sex differences in three asymmetry indices and to also determine the side dominance and type of asymmetry in facial features among Hausas of Kano state, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study carried out on Hausas of Kano state. A total of 283 individuals comprising 147 males and 136 females of age range 18–25 years were selected using simple random sampling technique. Photometric methods were used to capture the face. Three indices, signed asymmetry (SA), absolute asymmetry (AA), and composite asymmetry (CA), were used to assess asymmetry in facial dimensions. Independent sample t-test was used to test for sex differences in the variables, and one sample t-test was used to determine fluctuating asymmetry. Results: The result showed that females tend to have statistically significant mean value only in orbital width. For zygon to gnathion facial distance, the statistically significant higher mean was observed in males. For the three indices asymmetry, no significant sexual dimorphism in SA index was observed. However, males tend to have leftward SA in orbital width and zygon to gnathion distance. In AA and CA, a significant sexual dimorphism was noticed only in zygon to gnathion distance. Females had higher mean value in AA than the males; however, CA tended to be higher in male population. The facial variables exhibited fluctuating type of asymmetry. Conclusion: There are sex differences in AA and CA indices. Left warded type of SA was exhibited in male of Hausa origin. The facial asymmetry in Hausa ethnic group of Kano is more of fluctuating type of asymmetry.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):105-110
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/aoba.aoba_32_16
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Estimation of total muscle mass from simple anthropometric measurements
           for adults of Igbo ethnic group of South East Nigeria

    • Authors: Esomonu G Ugochukwu
      Pages: 111 - 117
      Abstract: Esomonu G Ugochukwu
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):111-117
      Introduction: Skeletal muscle mass represents about 30%–40% of the total body weight, and total body skeletal muscle mass plays a significant role in both health and disease states such as maintaining and changing posture, protein synthesis, and metabolism. This study is aimed at deriving predictive equations for estimating total muscle mass from simple anthropometric measurements such as body mass index, mid-arm circumference (MAC), and triceps skinfolds (TSF) for the Igbo ethnic group of South East Nigeria. Materials and Method: Anthropometric measurements of body weight, height, MAC, and skinfold measurement were carried out on 3000 adults of the age range of 18–40. They comprised 1500 each of males and females. A prediction equation for the measurement of muscle mass was derived using the measured anthropometric parameters which include the MAC and TSF. Result: The prediction equation obtained for muscle mass (kg) using MAC alone irrespective of age and gender for the Igbo ethnic group was (0.6731× MAC + [−5.407]). Conclusion: The result of this study is relevant to medical practitioners in the evaluation and detection of depletion of muscle mass that has occurred either physiologically or pathologically in adults; it will also prove useful in the field of medical anthropology, nutrition, and sports anatomy.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):111-117
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/aoba.aoba_1_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Dermatoglyphic patterns of myocardial patients in Southern Nigerian
           population

    • Authors: Emeka A Osunwoke, A N. E Nene
      Pages: 118 - 120
      Abstract: Emeka A Osunwoke, A N. E Nene
      Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):118-120
      Introduction: Dermatoglyphics has been well established as a diagnostic aid in a number of diseases having hereditary basis. The aim of this study is to determine if dermatoglyphic patterns can be used to identify myocardial patients in Southern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A total number of 130 patients comprising 85 patients with hypertension (44 males and 41 females) 45 patients with diabetes (21 males and 24 females) were recruited for this study. All patients were selected from the general outpatient departments of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital and Braithwaite Memorial Specialist Hospital. The parameters studied were the A-B ridge count and ATD and DAT angles on the palms. Results: Results revealed that for patients with hypertension, the mean A-B ridge counts, ATD angle, and DAT angle of the left hand in males were 25.92 ± 0.52, 43.56 ± 0.81°, and 63.89 ± 1.00°, respectively, while in females, they were 25.12 ± 0.49, 39.82 ± 0.91°, and 61.20 ± 1.06°, respectively. In the right hand, the mean A-B ridge count, ATD angle, and DAT angle were 26.39 ± 0.56, 42.13 ± 0.96°, and 62.06 ± 0.89°, respectively, in males while the females had 24.29 ± 0.51, 39.85 ± 0.62°, and 64.32 ± 0.81°, respectively. The mean A-B ridge count, ATD angle, and DAT angle of the left hand in male diabetics were 26.75 ± 0.76, 41.81 ± 1.21°, and 62.69 ± 1.15°, respectively, while in female diabetics, they were 25.43 ± 0.90, 42.74 ± 1.27°, and 61.64 ± 1.42°, respectively. There was no significant difference observed in all three parameters. The mean value for A-B ridge count, ATD angle, and DAT angle in the right hand of male diabetics was 26.63 ± 0.64, 41.88 ± 1.30°, and 62.19 ± 0.89°, respectively, while in female diabetics, it was 24.71 ± 0.99, 42.00 ± 1.13°, and 60.79 ± 1.16°, respectively. There was no significant difference observed in both sexes. Conclusion: The results obtained from this study would serve as an important aid in early diagnosis and etiology of myocardial disease.
      Citation: Annals of Bioanthropology 2016 4(2):118-120
      PubDate: Tue,18 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2315-7992.204685
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2017)
       
 
 
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