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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 429 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 429 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access  
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.127, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access  
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)

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Journal Cover
Apollo Medicine
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0976-0016 - ISSN (Online) 2213-3682
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [429 journals]
  • Screening for hydroxychloroquine retinal toxicity: Current recommendations

    • Authors: Nikunjkumar Dadhaniya; Isha Sood; Abhishek Patil; Himanshu Aggarwal; Sundeep Kumar Upadhyaya; Rohini Handa; Sirinder Jit Gupta
      Pages: 27 - 30
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine, Volume 14, Issue 1
      Author(s): Nikunjkumar Dadhaniya, Isha Sood, Abhishek Patil, Himanshu Aggarwal, Sundeep Kumar Upadhyaya, Rohini Handa, Sirinder Jit Gupta
      Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is a commonly used drug for the treatment of various autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Though HCQ may be associated infrequently with systemic side effects, its long-term use is associated with retinal toxicity in some patients. Most patients with HCQ associated retinal toxicity are asymptomatic initially. Retinal toxicity if allowed to persist is usually associated with irreversible damage. Therefore, screening is needed to detect retinal toxicity at an early stage to prevent visual loss. Various methods have been utilized for the screening of HCQ associated retinal toxicity, but until recently, no test(s) had been established as the gold standard. Current recommendation is to screen for HCQ associated retinal toxicity with both automated visual field and spectral domain optical coherence tomography after 5 years of use, provided baseline ocular examination is normal and there are no associated high risk factors.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.012
       
  • Functional outcomes in paediatric supracondylar fracture humerus treated
           with percutaneous pinning with cross K-wires

    • Authors: Hemant Chaturvedi; Vikram Khanna; Rakesh Bhargava; Raju Vaishya
      Pages: 34 - 41
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine, Volume 14, Issue 1
      Author(s): Hemant Chaturvedi, Vikram Khanna, Rakesh Bhargava, Raju Vaishya
      Background Supracondylar fracture of humerus is the most common elbow fractures in children. Percutaneous pinning is an effective modality of treatment, as it obliterates the problem of maintenance of reduction of the fracture and minimizes the risk of circulatory insufficiency. Methods 30 patients coming to the hospital during the period from November 2012 to November 2014 with closed Gartland type II and III supracondylar humerus fracture and managed with percutaneous pinning with two cross K-wires were included. Anteroposterior and lateral view X-rays of the affected as well as the normal elbow were taken and assessed regarding union, carrying angle, Baumann's angle and metaphyseal–diaphyseal angle. Flynn criteria were used for evaluation of the final functional outcome. Results The mean follow-up of the patients in this study was 6.3 months. None of the patient had a final carrying angle less than 10° and more than 16° with mean final carrying angle being 12.3°. The final functional outcome assessed according to Flynn criteria, was excellent in 83.33%, good in 3.33%, fair in 6.67% and poor in 6.67% patients. Conclusion Use of a medial entry pin for the treatment of paediatric supracondylar humerus fractures by closed reduction and percutaneous pinning using cross K-wires is safe as far as iatrogenic ulnar nerve injury and vascular complications are concerned, if an adequate technique is followed. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning with medial and lateral cross K-wires offers a practically feasible, economically viable and an effective treatment method for displaced supracondylar fracture humerus.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.010
       
  • Comparative study of injection autologous blood and steroid injection in
           the treatment of tennis elbow

    • Authors: Mangal Rawal; Raju Vaishya; K.C. Bachchu Ram; Pankaj Chand; Gopal Verma; Poojan Kumar Rokaya; Sagar Chhetri
      Pages: 49 - 56
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine, Volume 14, Issue 1
      Author(s): Mangal Rawal, Raju Vaishya, K.C. Bachchu Ram, Pankaj Chand, Gopal Verma, Poojan Kumar Rokaya, Sagar Chhetri
      Background It has been recently reported by various literatures that local injection of autologous blood in tennis elbow offers a significant benefit by virtue of various growth factors contained in the blood. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and role of autologous blood - injection for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis which is compared with the local injection of cortico-steroid. Methods It is a prospective randomized trial which was undertaken in 60 consecutive patients of untreated lateral epicondylitis. Randomization was done on alternate basis and two groups were constituted, first one receiving steroid injection and second one receiving the injection of autologous blood. Both groups were evaluated at 2 weeks, 12 weeks and 24 weeks for pain relief and stage of disease. Results There were no between group difference in demographic characteristics and pre-injection VAS score. In first follow up (2 weeks) VAS score in autologous blood group (1.33±1.29) is significantly lower (p value P 0.04) than that of steroid group (2.83±2). Similarly Nirschl's stage in first 2 week in autologous blood group was significantly lower than that in steroid group (2.8±1.45). VAS score and Nirschl's stage in 12 weeks and 24 weeks follow up in both group was similar. Functional score at first 2 weeks follow up is significantly better (p value- 0.039) in autologous blood group (excellent-73%, good-13.33%, fair-10% and poor-3.34%) than in steroid group (excellent-36.6%, good-30%, fair-20%, poor-13.33%). Functional score at 12 weeks and 24 weeks was comparable in both the group. Conclusion Autologous blood injection is more effective than steroid injection in the short term follow up in tennis elbow but its long-term outcome seems comparable.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.02.002
       
  • Streptococcus gallolyticus infection after knee arthroplasty: A case
           report

    • Authors: Yashwant Singh Tanwar; Anindya Debnath; Leena Mehndiratta; Yatinder Kharbanda; Raman Sardana
      Pages: 65 - 68
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine, Volume 14, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yashwant Singh Tanwar, Anindya Debnath, Leena Mehndiratta, Yatinder Kharbanda, Raman Sardana
      Infection after arthroplasty is disastrous both for the patient and surgeon. Infection by certain micro-organisms have additional important systemic implications. Streptococcus galloyticus is one such organism which has been implicated in colon carcinoma. We report a case of S. gallolyticus infection of a total knee prosthesis implant in a 72-year-old female who was managed successfully by two-stage revision. A thorough work-up did not show any evidence of gastro-intestinal malignancy, but nonspecific colitis was present on biopsy.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.02.001
       
  • Ollier disease

    • Authors: Mohammed Iftekar Ali
      Pages: 72 - 74
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine, Volume 14, Issue 1
      Author(s): Mohammed Iftekar Ali


      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.006
       
  • Spontaneously resolved gigantic retroperitoneal hematoma following
           

    • Authors: Ahmed Samy Elagwany
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 June 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Ahmed Samy Elagwany
      Introduction Retroperitoneal hemorrhage is a clinical entity that can present as a rare life-threatening event, causing significant morbidity and representing a diagnostic challenge. Case presentation We report the case of a patient with double mitral and aortic valve replacement who presented with retroperitoneal hematoma after right salpingo-ophrectomy, in whom anticoagulant therapy with warfarin and heparin aggravated the retroperitoneal hemorrhage, which was treated conservatively. Conclusion Delay in diagnosis is potentially fatal and high clinical suspicion remains crucial. Finally, it is a matter of controversy whether retroperitoneal hematomas should be surgically evacuated or conservatively treated and the final decision should be made after taking into consideration the patient's general condition and the possibility of permanent femoral or sciatic neuropathy due to compression syndrome.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2016.02.009
       
  • Editorial

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 June 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine


      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
       
  • Re-initiation of oral-anticoagulants in survivors of hemorrhagic stroke

    • Authors: Pushpendra Nath Renjen; Dinesh Chaudhari
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 May 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Pushpendra Nath Renjen, Dinesh Chaudhari
      Intra-cerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most feared and the deadliest complication of oral anticoagulant therapy, i.e. warfarin (Coumadin). After such an occurrence, clinicians wonder whether their patients should resume anticoagulant therapy. The decisions to reverse and re-initiate anticoagulation hinge on the phase of stroke as the risk of thromboembolism outweighs risk of bleeding in the chronic phase. Hence in the short term, most patients with ICH will benefit from acute reversal of anticoagulation, followed by gradual reinstitution of prophylactic-dose anticoagulation after first 24–72h. The underlying cause of stroke should guide the long-term management.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.05.003
       
  • A comprehensive review on lipoid proteinosis with emphasis on ECM1 gene
           mutation

    • Authors: Santosh K. Swain; Mahesh C. Sahu; Matam Kavita
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 May 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Santosh K. Swain, Mahesh C. Sahu, Matam Kavita
      The lipoid proteinosis (LP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations of extracellular matrix protein 1 gene (ECM1). The ECM1 helps in angiogenesis and connective tissue matrix generation, especially in bone and skin. The ECM1 helps in development of skin and its maintenance whereas in LP auto antibodies are raised against ECM1. Old LP patients revealed with turgid skin infiltration and thickening of general skin with a waxy and yellow colored appearance. With minor injury or stress develops excessive scarring with scars at the sites. Most often cases revealed with typical beaded papules at the eyelids and in certain cases, calcification of the temporal lobes have been observed. Also, laryngeal manifestations occur where hyaline-like material deposited in the mucous membranes of the vocal cords results with a faint or hoarse cry. Herein, we focused on LP and reviewed its epidemiology, clinical presentations, different kinds of treatment options and the progressive understanding of clinical manifestation and its histopathological characters. We have also scientifically elaborated on the various LP cases on ECM1 mutation. LP can be cured by early detection with open novel diagnosis with developing basic and clinical research approaches.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.05.002
       
  • An unusual presentation of Sturge–Weber syndrome with isolated left
           eye proptosis

    • Authors: Supriya Kushwah; K.S. Sahana; Ashutosh Kumar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Supriya Kushwah, K.S. Sahana, Ashutosh Kumar


      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2016.11.003
       
  • Renal transplantation in children: Current status and challenges

    • Authors: Charu Gupta; Asha Moudgil
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Charu Gupta, Asha Moudgil
      Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) since it decreases morbidity and mortality and improves quality of life. Potent immunosuppressive medications have significantly improved the short and medium-term outcomes while long-term outcomes continue to remain a challenge. This article reviews the current practices involved in the care of pediatric renal transplant recipients and challenges faced by them. Here, we provide a brief overview of various aspects of care for pediatric renal transplant recipients that include indications and contraindications, immunologic workup, pre-transplant evaluation, currently used immunosuppressive therapies, long-term complications and graft survival.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.02.009
       
  • Prevention of postpartum haemorrhage in patients with severe preeclampsia
           using carbetocin versus misoprostol

    • Authors: Khalid Abd Aziz Mohamad Ibrahim; Ahmed Samy Saad
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Khalid Abd Aziz Mohamad Ibrahim, Ahmed Samy Saad
      Background Haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal death worldwide, accounting for over 30% of maternal deaths in Africa and Asia. Postpartum bleeding was also 1.6 times higher in women with preeclampsia than in normotensive women. Objective We aimed to prevent postpartum haemorrhage in patients with severe preeclampsia by using either carbetocin or misoprostol. The primary outcome was postpartum haemorrhage (blood loss of ≥500ml) while our secondary outcomes included use of other uterotonics, blood transfusion, maternal complications and maternal death. Methods This prospective, randomized study was done at Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Benha University Hospital, Benha University. 60 pregnant women candidate for vaginal delivery with severe preeclampsia received either carbetocin or misoprostol after delivery of the baby. Results Carbetocin was superior to misoprostol with lower duration of third stage of labour (P =0.036), lower amount of blood loss (P =0.017) and lower incidence of PPH (P =0.03). There was no significant difference in the pre-delivery and the post-delivery haemoglobin concentration between the two groups with P =0.061. The need of additional uterotonics and blood transfusion was higher with misoprostol as compared to cabetocin with P =0.037 and 0.009, respectively. As regards side effects, misoprostol was associated with shivering and pyrexia in significantly high number of patients as compared to cabetocin while nausea, vomiting and headache were more associated with cabetocin. Conclusions Carbetocin was more effective than misoprostol when used in women with severe preeclampsia to prevent postpartum bleeding. Trial registration http://clinicaltrials.gov/NCT02086994.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.02.008
       
  • Umbilical swelling: A diagnostic dilemma

    • Authors: Ajaz Ahmad Rather; Afiya Shafi; Mehnaaz Sultan Khuroo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Ajaz Ahmad Rather, Afiya Shafi, Mehnaaz Sultan Khuroo
      We report a case of primary umbilical endometriosis a rare clinical entity, with an incidence of 0.5–1% of all the patients of endometriosis. 1 Endometriosis as such is a common gynecological condition and pelvis being the most common site of the disease. Extra pelvic site is less common and even more difficult to diagnose due to the extreme variability in presentation. Extra genital endometriosis is less common but has been described almost in every area of female body including bowel, bladder, lungs, brain, umbilicus and surgical scars. A 35 years old multi para presented to surgical OPD with complains of swelling at Umbilicus for past 3 months. FNAC was advised on OPD basis which to our surprise revealed an adenocarcinoma. Excision Biopsy with Umbliectomy was done which confirmed endometriosis of umbilicus.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.02.003
       
  • Why ‘Orthopods’ need to publish'

    • Authors: Raju Vaishya
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine, Volume 14, Issue 1
      Author(s): Raju Vaishya


      PubDate: 2017-07-24T03:42:12Z
       
  • Gyroscope based two pod pinless navigation in total knee arthroplasty

    • Authors: Yash Gulati; Anil Kumar Panda; Vibhu Bahl; Pratyush Gupta
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Yash Gulati, Anil Kumar Panda, Vibhu Bahl, Pratyush Gupta


      PubDate: 2017-03-13T01:38:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.02.005
       
  • Kuttner's tumor or chronic sclerosing sialadenitis of the salivary gland
           – Benign tumor like lesion

    • Authors: Gite Vandana; Dhakane Maruti
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Gite Vandana, Dhakane Maruti
      Kuttner's tumor or chronic sclerosing sialadenitis although described more than a century ago, is relatively rare in occurrence. It is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the salivary gland. This condition is benign, but presents as hard, indurated and enlarged masses that are clinically indistinguishable from salivary gland neoplasms or tumors. It is usually diagnosed by histopathologist when the lesion is surgically biopsied to confirm clinical diagnosis of malignancy. We present a case of a young 26 years old, female patient with chronic sclerosing sialadenitis otherwise known as Kuttner tumor in order to raise awareness of this interesting and not well-known entity.

      PubDate: 2017-03-12T01:27:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.02.004
       
  • Assessment of Ponseti technique for clubfoot

    • Authors: Vikram Khanna; Raju Vaishya
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Vikram Khanna, Raju Vaishya
      Introduction Clubfoot is a really complicated deformity of the foot. There are 4 components to this deformity which are forefoot varus, adduction, cavus and equinus. The main goal of the treatment is the attainment of a supple plantigrade foot which is cosmetically and functionally acceptable. This study has been done with the aim to present with the authors experience of managing clubfoot using ponseti. Material & Methods This prospective study included 100 children with 137 club feet from January 2015 to December 2016. All children below the age of 2 years with congenital talipes equino-varus (CTEV) were included in this study. The severity of the deformity was assessed with the help of the Pirani's score and clinical evaluation of the foot was taken and noted. In all the cases the Ponseti method was used for the management. After cast removal the foot was kept in a foot abduction brace with the corrected foot kept in a foot abduction brace for 23 hours in a day and this was decreased to night time wearing after 3 months and the parents were advised to continue wearing it till the age of 5 years. All the observations were done by a single observer to prevent any inter-observer variation. Results Out of 100 patients 63 were unilateral clubfoot and 37 were bilateral cases of clubfoot. The mean number of casts was found to be 7.56 (4–9). There was recurrence seen in 7 feet which had to be managed with 2–3 serial manipulations and casting and these resolved. Conclusion Ponseti technique is a very useful method of management of CTEV.

      PubDate: 2017-03-12T01:27:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.02.006
       
  • Association of vitamin D and knee osteoarthritis – A review

    • Authors: Raju Vaishya; Vipul Vijay; Syed Mustafa Hussaini; Amit K. Agarwal
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Raju Vaishya, Vipul Vijay, Syed Mustafa Hussaini, Amit K. Agarwal
      Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressively degenerating joint disease primarily affecting the weight-bearing joints of the body. The precise etiopathogenesis and mechanism of progression of osteoarthritis still remain elusive. However, many known risk factors such as vitamin D deficiency, obesity, genetics, and trauma, etc. have been studied and hypothesized to play a significant role in its occurrence and progression. Studies into the effects of low vitamin D levels on pain and joint function to date have yielded equivocal results. Due to the apparent conflicting effects of vitamin D in knee OA, further research is required to fully elucidate its role in the development and progression of the disease.

      PubDate: 2017-03-12T01:27:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.011
       
  • Nailfold capillaroscopy – An underutilised investigation in
           rheumatology

    • Authors: Isha Sood; Nikunjkumar Dadhaniya; Sundeep Kumar Upadhyaya; Sirinder Jit Gupta; Rohini Handa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Isha Sood, Nikunjkumar Dadhaniya, Sundeep Kumar Upadhyaya, Sirinder Jit Gupta, Rohini Handa
      Nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) is a simple, noninvasive, outpatient procedure that permits direct visualization of capillaries through the skin of terminal nailfold with the help of digital microscope. Autoimmune Rheumatic diseases (AIRDs) are associated with abnormalities of microcirculation (microangiopathy) that can be visualized with NFC. Among all AIRDs, systemic sclerosis (SSc) is known to have prominent microangiopathy that contributes to Raynaud's phenomenon, digital ulceration, and pulmonary hypertension in this disease. These microcirculation abnormalities are labeled “the scleroderma pattern”. They occur in a clearly defined sequence of “early”, “active”, and “late” pattern and correlate with internal organ involvement. Apart from SSc, microangiopathy can be seen in dermatomyositis and the scleroderma-spectrum disorders. NFC is invaluable in differentiating primary from secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. NFC despite being simple and noninvasive is underutilized in clinical practice.

      PubDate: 2017-02-27T20:29:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.003
       
  • Intramuscular hemangioma of left lower limb

    • Authors: Supriya Kushwah; H. Mithun; Mohammed Reshad
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Supriya Kushwah, H. Mithun, Mohammed Reshad


      PubDate: 2017-02-15T16:16:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2016.09.003
       
  • T-cell/histiocyte-rich B-cell lymphoma of spleen: A case report

    • Authors: Srikanta Panda; Roshni Tirkey; Anshuman Sarangi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Srikanta Panda, Roshni Tirkey, Anshuman Sarangi
      Splenomegaly is a frequent yet challenging condition that clinicians have to deal within their daily clinical practice. Although the spleen is commonly involved in disseminated lymphoma, primary lymphoma of the spleen is rare. A great majority of the reported cases are of B-cell lineage, with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the most common. A new variant of T-cell/histiocyte-rich B-cell was first described by Dogan et al. in 2003. 1 The combined morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic data are essential for a correct diagnosis of splenic T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma. We report a classical case of T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma of the spleen in a 45-year-old male patient with clinical diagnosis of splenomegaly.

      PubDate: 2017-02-15T16:16:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2016.11.009
       
  • Practice guidelines for approaching articular cartilage defects of the
           knee

    • Authors: Abhishek Vaish; Raju Vaishya; Vipul Vijay; Amit Kumar Agarwal
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Abhishek Vaish, Raju Vaishya, Vipul Vijay, Amit Kumar Agarwal
      Cartilage lesions pose both diagnostic and treatment challenges to the treating orthopaedic surgeons. An early diagnosis of these lesions is the key to success, and hence awareness about these lesions is mandatory to reach a prompt conclusion and decision making. There are newer techniques published almost every day all over the world. We have tried to compile all the techniques commonly performed and the available guidelines, critically analyzed them and came up with an algorithm which suits the patients in the Indian subcontinent.

      PubDate: 2017-02-15T16:16:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.009
       
  • Spontaneous rupture of quadriceps tendon: A report of two cases and review
           of the literature

    • Authors: Thaddeus Chika Agu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Thaddeus Chika Agu
      Introduction Spontaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon is rare. A sudden snap in the knee and feeling of giving way and occasionally falling are associated with rupture of the tendon. Subsequently, the loss of extensor mechanism of the knee limits ambulation. The aim of this report is to highlight this rare entity and to demonstrate that simple tendon repair could also give good results. Presentation of case The two patients were middle aged who were apparently healthy with active lifestyles prior to their injuries. The first patient is a 61-year-old lady who was descending the staircase when she suddenly felt her knee gave way. She supported herself on the rail and subsequently started ambulating with a stick until presentation. The second patient is a 57-year-old male who was doing a pre-game work out in a lawn tennis court when he felt a sudden pull on his right knee and he slumped. After some weeks, his pain subsided but he noticed poor clearance during gait. A big defect, just above the patella was found in the usual position of the quadriceps tendon in each patient. Simple end-to-end tendon repairs were done for both patients with excellent restoration of the extensor mechanism. Discussion Spontaneous rupture of a strong tendon such as quadriceps is not common. The sudden episode of pain, knee swelling, a gap in the quadriceps and loss of knee extension make clinical diagnosis unmistakable. However, radiological exclusion of patella fracture is important. Conclusion Restoration of the extensor mechanism of the knee is a sine qua non for effective ambulation. The quadriceps pull would always create a gap in the tendon and healing is only possible by surgical apposition of the tendon ends and in our cases by direct suturing.

      PubDate: 2017-02-09T13:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.004
       
  • An intra-thyroid thyroglossal duct cyst – A case report

    • Authors: Gite Vandana; Dhakane Maruti
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Gite Vandana, Dhakane Maruti
      Thyroglossal cysts develop from a persistent portion of the thyroglossal tract and are the most common cause of midline neck masses. It can occur anywhere along the path of the thyroid gland from the base of the tongue to the suprasternal notch. However, intra-thyroid thyroglossal duct cyst in an adult is rare finding. We present the case of a 50-year male presented with a cystic thyroid nodule due to an intrathyroid thyroglossal duct cyst. Pathologic analysis revealed the cyst to be lined by a squamous epithelium consistent with a thyroglossal duct cyst surrounded by normal thyroid tissue. Although pathogenesis of an alone thyroglossal duct cyst in the thyroid remains unknown, this case suggest that thyroglossal duct cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a thyroid nodule.

      PubDate: 2017-02-09T13:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.007
       
  • Tourniquet during total knee arthroplasty: A review

    • Authors: Manish Kumar Tiwari; Raju Vaishya; Amit Kumar Agarwal; Vipul Vijay
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Manish Kumar Tiwari, Raju Vaishya, Amit Kumar Agarwal, Vipul Vijay


      PubDate: 2017-02-04T11:30:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.005
       
  • Biplanar isolated tarsal navicular fracture dislocation: A case report and
           review of literature

    • Authors: Raju Vaishya; Sagar Chhetri; Abhishek Vaish; Amit Kumar Agarwal; Vipul Vijay
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Raju Vaishya, Sagar Chhetri, Abhishek Vaish, Amit Kumar Agarwal, Vipul Vijay
      One case of biplanar isolated fracture and dorsal dislocation of the tarsal navicular is reported in a 72-year-old male. We had analyzed the mechanism of injury which suggested that the dislocation of the navicular cannot occur without a fracture because of anatomical considerations. These types of injury always require anatomical reduction and stable fixation, and it is mandatory to restore the keystone function of the navicular to the longitudinal arch of the foot.

      PubDate: 2017-02-04T11:30:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.008
       
  • Contribution of laparoscopy in small bowel obstruction: Report on two rare
           causes of small bowel obstruction

    • Authors: Priyanka Tiwari; Juneed Lanker; Dinesh Zirpy; K.R. Palanisamy; Prasanna Kumar Reddy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Priyanka Tiwari, Juneed Lanker, Dinesh Zirpy, K.R. Palanisamy, Prasanna Kumar Reddy
      Introduction Bowel obstruction occurs when the normal flow of intraluminal content is interrupted. The most common cause of small bowel obstruction is adhesion but other rare causes of intestinal obstruction have also been reported as fecolith, foreign body or bezoar, GIST, and abdominal cocoon. Laparoscopy as diagnostic as well as therapeutic tool in small bowel obstruction seems to be useful. Methods We described two rare causes of intestinal obstruction. The aim of the present article is to stress the role of laparoscopy associated with computed tomography (CT) in diagnostic confirmation of causes of intestinal obstruction as well as reasons for conversion. We also reviewed the relevant published literature. Result CASE 1: A 63-year-old female presented with history of recurrent episodes of pain in left side of abdomen for 1 year. Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (CECT) showed rounded radiopaque foreign body in distal jejunum. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis and reduction of hernial content were done. Laparoscopic surgery converted to open for removal of foreign body and hernioplasty. CASE 2 64 year elderly male presented with history of intermittent episodes of colicky pain in periumbilical region for 1 month. CECT abdomen showed abdominal cocoon. Pneumoperitoneum access was not succeeded, thus exploratory laparotomy and adhesiolysis was done. Conclusion In small bowel obstruction, diagnostic laparoscopy has to be done for confirmation of diagnosis and if possible to release the cause of obstruction, but conversion to open by giving either small incision or exploratory laparotomy should be the choice to completely remove the cause for the further prevention of recurrence and complications.

      PubDate: 2017-02-04T11:30:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2016.11.006
       
  • Lepra reaction presenting with inflammatory polyarthritis

    • Authors: Abhishek Patil; Sundeep Kumar Upadhyaya; Nikunjkumar Dadhaniya; Rohini Handa
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Abhishek Patil, Sundeep Kumar Upadhyaya, Nikunjkumar Dadhaniya, Rohini Handa
      Hansen's disease (HD) is still prevalent in many parts of India. It can be complicated by the lepra reactions which are immunologically mediated episodes of acute or subacute inflammation. Arthritis and tenosynovitis are under reported and under recognized manifestations of these lepra reactions. Here we report a case of long standing HD presenting with polyarthritis and tenosynovitis as the initial manifestation of the lepra reaction.

      PubDate: 2017-02-04T11:30:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.002
       
  • A Study of Traumatic Dorsal and Lumbar Vertebral Injuries with
           Neurological Deficit

    • Authors: Chirag S. Kapoor; Ashit K. Mehta; Paresh P. Golwala; Aditya A. Merh; Maulik R. Jhaveri
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Chirag S. Kapoor, Ashit K. Mehta, Paresh P. Golwala, Aditya A. Merh, Maulik R. Jhaveri
      Introduction It has been reported that 6% of all fractures affect the spinal column, and 90% of them are found in the thoracic or lumbar regions. However, information on traumatic SCI is minimal for developing countries. Therefore, we conducted this study to determine the pattern, causes and surgical outcome of dorsal and lumbar spine trauma in the rural Indian population. Methods 21 patients who were admitted with a diagnosis of thoracic or lumbar spine injury were studied. There were 15 males and 6 females with an average age of 41.6 years. All the patients were followed over a minimum period of 18 months and the results were analyzed. Results Most of the patients belonged to the labourer group, both industrial and farm labourers, constituting 57.14%. The average duration of injury to admission is 2.5 days. Fall from height (FFH) was the leading cause of spine injury and constituted 61.91%. The dorso-lumbar junction, i.e. D11, D12, L1 and L2, was the most affected, constituting 66.66% of all the injuries. In most of the fractures, stabilization was done with 2 pairs of pedicle screws (one proximal and one distal), as in 17 out of 19 operated patients (89.48%). The average follow-up duration was 22 months. According to our result assessment criteria, 55% of the patients had excellent-to-good result at final follow-up. Conclusion The number of screws used had no co-relation with the kyphosis correction and neurological outcome of the patient and fusion is not mandatory to maintain the correction of deformity.

      PubDate: 2017-01-28T10:36:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2017.01.001
       
  • Role of point of care (POC) and VDRL/RPR tests in the screening of
           syphilis

    • Authors: Natesan Thilakavathi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 January 2017
      Source:Apollo Medicine
      Author(s): Natesan Thilakavathi
      Aim To compare the effectiveness of POCT and VDRL in the screening of syphilis among high risk group (HRG). Methods and material The blood samples were collected from the HRGs’ attending the STD OP of IOV from January 2010 to December 2010. The serum specimens from these blood samples were subjected to new point of care test (POCT – Rapid Specific Treponemal) test, Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) / Rapid plasma Reagin (RPR) and Treponema pallidum haemagglutination (TPHA). Statistical analysis used SPSS version 10.0 and EPI 6 package, Chi-square test. To assess the statistical significance at 5% level, a two-sided test was considered. Results A total of 1131 High risk group (HRG) patients attended. Out of this, 599 (59%) were Men who have Sex with Men (MSM), 402 (35.5%) were Female sex worker (FSW), and 130 (15.5%) were Transgender (TG). The positivity rate of Syphilis was 68 among 599 (11.3%) in MSM, 33 among 400 (8.2%) in FSW and 17 among 130 (13%) in TG by POC test. The overall prevalence of syphilis by POCT test was 10.4% in HRG. The positivity rate of syphilis by VDRL test was 3.3(%) The concordance reactivity of the reactive serum sample tested by POC test was 89% with TPHA and was 33% with VDRL. If VDRL alone were used to screen Syphilis, 2/3 of the positive patients would be missed in this group. Conclusions The POCT test-screening method is highly sensitive, rapid, cost-effective, and easy to perform. Thus this treponemal test can be used to screen Syphilis to identify the true burden of disease in the community.

      PubDate: 2017-01-13T09:24:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.apme.2016.11.005
       
 
 
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