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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access  
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access  
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)

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Journal Cover European Journal of Dentistry
  [SJR: 0.496]   [H-I: 11]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1305-7456 - ISSN (Online) 1305-7464
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Cytotoxic evaluation of a new ceramic-based root canal sealer on human
           fibroblasts

    • Authors: Sandra Chakar, Sylvie Changotade, Nada Osta, Issam Khalil
      Pages: 141 - 148
      Abstract: Sandra Chakar, Sylvie Changotade, Nada Osta, Issam Khalil
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):141-148
      Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of a new bioceramic-based root canal sealer (BioMM) by direct and indirect contact with human fibroblasts and to compare it with a zinc oxide-eugenol sealer, the Pulp Canal Sealer-extended working time (PCS-EWT). Materials and Methods: Cell viability was assessed through direct and indirect contact between human fibroblasts and sealer. Direct contact was performed at 24 h, whereas the indirect contact was performed at 24 and 48 h at different concentrations: 100%, 50%, and 25%. After direct contact, 3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used and the optical density was measured by a spectrophotometer. Giemsa stain was also performed for a qualitative evaluation of the cells. Statistical Analysis Used: Shapiro–Wilk test was used to verify the normality of distribution of the variable. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey tests using SPSS for Windows software 18.0. The significance level used was P < 0.05. Results: Direct contact showed a significantly higher cell viability with BioMM as compared to PCS-EWT (P = 0.002). Cell viability at 24 h was significantly higher with BioMM compared to PCS-EWT for the concentrations of 50% (P = 0.004) and 25% (P = 0.003), whereas no significant difference was noted at 100% (P = 0.141). Cell viability at 48 h was significantly higher with BioMM as compared to PCS-EWT at 25% (P = 0.007). No significant difference was observed at 100% (P = 0.484) and 50% (P = 0.185). Conclusion: BioMM may be considered minimally cytotoxic if accidentally extruded into the periapical tissues.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):141-148
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_2_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Discoloration of different esthetic restorative materials: A
           spectrophotometric evaluation

    • Authors: Matteo Ceci, Matteo Viola, Davide Rattalino, Riccardo Beltrami, Marco Colombo, Claudio Poggio
      Pages: 149 - 156
      Abstract: Matteo Ceci, Matteo Viola, Davide Rattalino, Riccardo Beltrami, Marco Colombo, Claudio Poggio
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):149-156
      Objective: A crucial property of esthetic restorative materials is their long-term color stability. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the color stability of esthetic restorative materials (one microfilled flowable composite, one nanofilled composite, one nanoybrid composite, one microfilled composite, and one nanoybrid ormocer-based composite) after surface roughening with cola and exposure to different staining solutions (coffee and red wine). Materials and Methods: All materials were polymerized into silicone rubber rings (2 mm × 6 mm × 8 mm) to obtain 150 specimens identical in size. Seventy-five specimens of Group A were first exposed to cola for 24 h, and then samples were immersed in coffee or red wine over a 28-day test period. A colorimetric evaluation, according to the CIE L*a*b* system, was performed at 7, 14, 21, 28 days. Shapiro–Wilk test and Kruskal–Wallis analysis of variance were applied to assess significant differences among restorative materials. Means were compared with Scheffe's multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. Results: Specimens of Group A showed higher variations when compared with Group B's specimens (P < 0.05). After 28 days, the immersion protocols caused a clinically perceivable color change for all materials tested (P < 0.05). CeramX Universal and Admira Fusion showed the lowest ΔE variations (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Staining beverages caused significant discolorations for all the materials tested. The first exposure to cola enhanced the subsequent staining with coffee or red wine. Nanohybrid composites reported the lowest color variations.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):149-156
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_313_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of dentinal defects during root canal preparation using
           thermomechanically processed nickel-titanium files

    • Authors: Bertan Kesim, Burak Sagsen, Tugrul Aslan
      Pages: 157 - 161
      Abstract: Bertan Kesim, Burak Sagsen, Tugrul Aslan
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):157-161
      Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of root cracks after root canal instrumentation with thermomechanically processed nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) files with different instrumentation kinematics. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 extracted mandibular premolars with mature apices and straight root canals were divided into five groups and used in this study. In Group 1, 30 teeth were prepared using hand K-files and assigned to control group, Group 2 was instrumented using K3XF Rotary files (SybronEndo, Glendora, CA, USA) with continuous rotary motion. The teeth in Group 3 were instrumented by ProTaper Next (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) rotary files which make asymmetric rotary motion, In Group 4, teeth were instrumented by RECIPROC (VDW, Munich, Germany) with reciprocation motion and in Group 5, teeth were instrumented by Twisted File (TF) Adaptive (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA) files that use combination of continuous rotation and reciprocation motion (n = 30/per group). All the roots were horizontally sectioned 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex with a low speed saw under water cooling. Then, the slices were examined through a stereomicroscope to determine the presence of dentinal microcracks. Results: For the apical (3-mm) and coronal (9-mm) sections, the ProTaper Next and TF Adaptive produced significantly more cracks than the hand files, RECIPROC, and K3XF (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the experimental groups and control group at the 6-mm level (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, all thermal-treated Ni-Ti instruments and hand files caused microcracks in root canal dentin.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):157-161
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_254_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Association of oral health behavior and the use of dental services with
           oral health literacy among adults in Tehran, Iran

    • Authors: Mohammad Mehdi Naghibi Sistani, Jorma I Virtanen, Reza Yazdani, Heikki Murtomaa
      Pages: 162 - 167
      Abstract: Mohammad Mehdi Naghibi Sistani, Jorma I Virtanen, Reza Yazdani, Heikki Murtomaa
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):162-167
      Objective: To assess the association of oral health behavior (OHB) and the use of dental services with oral health literacy (OHL) among Iranian adults. Methods: This was a cross-sectional population study of a random sample of 1031 adults aged 18–65 in Tehran, Iran. We collected data on tooth brushing frequency, the consumption of sugary snacks and beverages, and time since last dental visit. To measure OHL, we used a validated OHL adults' questionnaire (OHL-AQ). In addition to descriptive analysis, we used multiple logistic regression models to assess the association of OHB and the most recent dental visit with OHL while controlling for socioeconomic and demographic factors. Results: The participants' mean age was 36.3 (standard deviation 12.9), and 51% were women. Of the participants, 81.3% reported brushing their teeth daily (≥1/day), 37.6% consumed sugary snacks or beverages between meals less than once daily (<1/day), and 36.8% used dental services within the past 6 months. In the adjusted models, high OHL scores significantly correlated with daily (≥1/day) tooth brushing (odds ratio [OR] = 1.97, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30–2.98), the consumption of sugary snacks or beverages (<1/day between meals) (OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.13–2.15) and the recent use of dental services (≤6 months) (OR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.15–2.21), respectively. Conclusions: OHL relates significantly to improved OHB and the use of dental services. Oral health promotion programs should, therefore, take into account improvements in adults' OHL, particularly in countries with developing health-care services.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):162-167
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_332_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Patterns of dental caries among school children assessed using Caries
           Assessment Spectrum and Treatment tool

    • Authors: Hisham El Batawi, Kausar Sadia Fakhruddin
      Pages: 168 - 173
      Abstract: Hisham El Batawi, Kausar Sadia Fakhruddin
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):168-173
      Objective: The present study aimed to assess and monitor patterns of dental caries among primary and permanent molars using Caries Assessment Spectrum and Treatment (CAST) index and to evaluate integration of CAST tool into patient health information (PHI) system of a Teaching Dental Hospital. Materials and Methods: Dental records of n = 348 children, aged 7–9-years, attending University Dental Hospital Sharjah, for routine checkup and treatment as part of School Dental Program were assessed and translated into CAST codes. Dental caries prevalence for the second primary and first permanent molars were recorded. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to assess the correlation of the status between primary and permanent molar. Results: CAST codes 0–2 were observed only in about 3% of primary and almost 5% in permanent dentition. The prevalence of children with diseased first permanent molar (codes 4–7) was almost 67%, while it was over 70% in second primary molars. A strong correlations were observed in the status between second primary and first permanent molars in the lower jaw on both right and left sides, r was 0.694 and 0.643 (P = 0.001), respectively. In the upper jaw, both right and left second primary molars revealed moderate correlation r = 0.435 (P ≤ 0.05) between disease stages with their neighboring permanent first molars. The unweighted kappa value for the intraexaminer reliability was 0.97 for second primary and 0.95 for first permanent molars. Conclusion: Our study recommends the integration of CAST tool in the PHI system where a simple numerical value can express clinical progress, overcome interruptions of treatment, and ensures continuity of patient care in teaching hospitals.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):168-173
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_120_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • A comparative in vitro study on fluoride release and water sorption of
           different flowable esthetic restorative materials

    • Authors: Asmaa Youssif Harhash, Iman Ibrahim ElSayad, Ahmad G. S Zaghloul
      Pages: 174 - 179
      Abstract: Asmaa Youssif Harhash, Iman Ibrahim ElSayad, Ahmad G. S Zaghloul
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):174-179
      Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate fluoride release and water sorption of three flowable esthetic restorative materials: a giomer, a fluoride-releasing resin composite, and a nonfluoridated resin composite. Materials and Methods: Ten samples from a giomer, a fluoride releasing nano-hybrid, and a nonfluoridated nano-hybrid composite were prepared and immersed in deionized water. Fluoride measurements were done using an ion-specific electrode attached to a microprocessor-based fluoride meter after 1 day, 1 week, and 4 weeks. Another thirty samples were made and placed in desiccators. Water sorption was calculated by weighing the specimens before and after water immersion for 1 day, 1 week, and 4 weeks. Data analysis was done using two-way ANOVA, paired t-test (P < 0.05), and Pearson's correlation coefficient to calculate correlations between fluoride release and water sorption. Results: The highest fluoride release was from giomer after 1 day, it was statistically significant from all other groups. Both nano-hybrid composites after 1 day showed significantly lower water sorption which was different than all the other groups. Pearson's correlation showed no significant correlations between fluoride release and water sorption. Conclusions: Fluoride release is material and time dependent, while water sorption is material dependent.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):174-179
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_228_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • In vitro evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic brackets bonded with
           different adhesive systems

    • Authors: Ramin Atash, Ali Fneiche, Sibel Cetik, Babak Bahrami, Alain Balon-Perin, Maria Orellana, R&#233;gine Glineur
      Pages: 180 - 185
      Abstract: Ramin Atash, Ali Fneiche, Sibel Cetik, Babak Bahrami, Alain Balon-Perin, Maria Orellana, Régine Glineur
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):180-185
      Objective: Adhesives systems have a drawback when utilized for bonding orthodontic brackets: they shrink during photopolymerization creating microleakage. The aim of this study was to assess the stability of different orthodontic adhesives around brackets and enamel. Materials and Methods: Sixty noncarious mandibular premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into six groups of adhesives used for bonding brackets to dental enamel: NeoBond® Light Cure Adhesive Kit, Transbond™ Plus Self-Etching, Victory V-Slot APC PLUS® + Transbond™ MIP, Rely-A-Bond® Kit, Light Cure Orthodontic Adhesive Kit (OptiBond®), and Transbond™ MIP. Following bonding, all teeth underwent 2500 cycles of thermal cycling in baths ranging from 5°C to 55°C before being immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 h. All samples were examined under a binocular microscope to assess the degree of microleakage at the “bracket-adhesive” and “adhesive-enamel” interfaces in the gingival and occlusal regions of the bracket. Results: A significant difference was found at the “occlusal bracket-adhesive” interface. The highest microleakage values were found in the occlusal region, although no significant. Microleakage was observed in all groups. Conclusion: Group 2 had the highest microleakage values whereas Group 6 had the lowest values.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):180-185
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_312_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • New dental implant selection criterion based on implant design

    • Authors: Mohamed I El-Anwar, Mohamed M El-Zawahry, Eman M Ibraheem, Mohammad Zakaria Nassani, Hisham ElGabry
      Pages: 186 - 191
      Abstract: Mohamed I El-Anwar, Mohamed M El-Zawahry, Eman M Ibraheem, Mohammad Zakaria Nassani, Hisham ElGabry
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):186-191
      Objective: A comparative study between threaded and plain dental implant designs was performed to find out a new criterion for dental implant selection. Materials and Methods: Several dental implant designs with a systematic increase in diameter and length were positioned in a cylindrical-shaped bone section and analyzed using finite element method. Four loading types were tested on different dental implant designs; tension of 50 N, compression of 100 N, bending of 20 N, and torque of 2 Nm, to derive design curves. Results: Better stress distribution on both spongy and cortical bone was noted with an increase in dental implant diameter and length. With the increase in dental implant side area, a stress reduction in the surrounding bones was observed, where threaded dental implants showed better behavior over the plain ones. Conclusions: Increasing value of ratio between dental implant side area and its cross-sectional area reduces stresses transferred to cortical and spongy bones. The use of implants with higher ratio of side area to cross-section area, especially with weak jaw bone, is recommended.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):186-191
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1305-7456.208432
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Correlation between salivary cortisol levels and dental anxiety in
           children of smokers and nonsmokers

    • Authors: S Pavani Reddy, M Ghanashyam Prasad, A Naga RadhaKrishna, Kaniti Saujanya, N V. K Raviteja, B Deepthi
      Pages: 192 - 195
      Abstract: S Pavani Reddy, M Ghanashyam Prasad, A Naga RadhaKrishna, Kaniti Saujanya, N V. K Raviteja, B Deepthi
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):192-195
      Objectives: The present study was undertaken to evaluate salivary cortisol levels in children of smokers and nonsmokers and thereby establishing the relationship between cortisol levels in response to anxiety in children based on their father's habit of smoking. Materials and Methods: The study population aged between 8 and 10 years includes two groups. Group 1 is comprised 20 children of cigarette smokers and Group 2 is comprised 20 children of nonsmokers. The passive drooling technique was used to collect unstimulated saliva from the children using a sterile container. Salivary cortisol levels were evaluated using Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay method. The obtained data were subjected to statistical analysis using SPSS software and paired t-test. Results: Higher mean salivary cortisol levels were found in children of smokers compared to children of nonsmokers and the difference between them was significant statistically (P < 0.05). Higher salivary cortisol levels were found in females compared to males and the result was significant statistically (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This study has proved that the smoking habit of the father has a negative influence on the anxiety levels of their children.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):192-195
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_171_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of accuracy of shade selection using two spectrophotometer
           systems: Vita Easyshade and Degudent Shadepilot

    • Authors: Mohammad Hassan Kalantari, Seyed Ahmad Ghoraishian, Mina Mohaghegh
      Pages: 196 - 200
      Abstract: Mohammad Hassan Kalantari, Seyed Ahmad Ghoraishian, Mina Mohaghegh
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):196-200
      Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the accuracy of shade matching using two spectrophotometric devices. Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients who require a full coverage restoration for one of their maxillary central incisors were selected while the adjacent central incisor was intact. 3 same frameworks were constructed for each tooth using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing technology. Shade matching was performed using Vita Easyshade spectrophotometer, Shadepilot spectrophotometer, and Vitapan classical shade guide for the first, second, and third crown subsequently. After application, firing, and glazing of the porcelain, the color was evaluated and scored by five inspectors. Results: Both spectrophotometric systems showed significantly better results than visual method (P < 0.05) while there were no significant differences between Vita Easyshade and Shadepilot spectrophotometers (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Spectrophotometers are a good substitute for visual color selection methods.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):196-200
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_195_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Assessment of consistency in the dimension of gutta-percha cones of
           ProTaper Next and WaveOne with their corresponding number files

    • Authors: Nitika Bajaj, Prashant Monga, Pardeep Mahajan
      Pages: 201 - 205
      Abstract: Nitika Bajaj, Prashant Monga, Pardeep Mahajan
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):201-205
      Objectives: To compare the dimensions of gutta-percha (GP) cones of ProTaper Next (25/0.06) and WaveOne (25/0.08) in relation to their corresponding instruments of the same dimension, respectively. Materials and Methods: Two groups of GP cones were made with 25 cones in each group. Group 1 consisted of 25 GP cones # 25/0.06 (ProTaper Next). Group 2 consisted of 25 GP cones # 25/0.08 (WaveOne). Measurements were done at D1 (1 mm short of the tip), D3 (3 mm short of the tip), and D11 (11 mm short of the tip) for GP cones of both groups and were compared with their corresponding instruments. Results: Group 1 (ProTaper) 25/.06 GP points showed greater diameters than those of the corresponding instrument, which was statistically significant. Group 2 (WaveOne) 25/0.08 GP points showed greater diameters than those of the corresponding instrument which was statistically significant whereas it was nonsignificant at level D1. Conclusion: Diameters of both ProTaper Next and WaveOne GP cones were greater than their corresponding instruments. Hence, there are chances of under obturation with both systems.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):201-205
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_167_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Assessment of resin-dentin interfacial morphology of two ethanol-based
           universal adhesives: A scanning electron microscopy study

    • Authors: Mohamed Moustafa Awad
      Pages: 206 - 209
      Abstract: Mohamed Moustafa Awad
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):206-209
      Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the resin-dentin interfacial morphology created by two universal adhesives using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: The occlusal surfaces of ten (n = 5) molars were reduced to expose a flat surface of dentin. Two universal adhesives, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive and Tetric N-Bond Universal, were independently applied to air-dried dentin. Light-cured resin-based composite restorative materials were used to incrementally build a composite “buildup.” The specimen was sectioned mesiodistally to expose the resin-dentin interface. The inner surfaces of the specimens were polished. Samples were immersed in hydrochloric acid and then rinsed using distilled water. This was followed by immersion of the samples in 1% sodium hypochlorite solution. Then, samples were thoroughly rinsing with distilled water. Dehydration of samples was performed using ascending concentration of ethyl alcohol. Prepared samples were observed SEM at magnifications ×1500 and x4000. Results: Both universal adhesives could penetrate dentin-forming well-defined resin tags, lateral branches as well as a uniform hybrid layer. Conclusions: Two tested universal adhesives applied in self-etch mode can infiltrate into dentin-producing high-quality interfacial morphology. Similar interfacial morphology may be due to the similarity in composition and application mode.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):206-209
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_244_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Cone beam computed tomographic evaluation of styloid process: A
           retrospective study of 1000 patients

    • Authors: Merve Donmez, Ozlem Okumus, Filiz Namdar Pekiner
      Pages: 210 - 215
      Abstract: Merve Donmez, Ozlem Okumus, Filiz Namdar Pekiner
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):210-215
      Objective: The styloid process (SP) is a bony projection, located just anterior to the stylomastoid foramen, the normal length of which is approximately 20–30 mm. The length of SP when exceeds 30 mm it is said to “elongated.” The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the prevalence of elongated SP (ESP) by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) examination in Turkish subpopulation and its relation to gender and age. Materials and Methods: This study analyzed CBCT of 1000 patients who were randomly selected to participate and were aged from 14 to 78 years. Any radiograph with questionable SP was excluded from the study. The apparent length and thickness of the SP were measured by two dental and maxillofacial radiologists. The ESP was classified with radiographic appearance-based morphology of elongation. The data were analyzed with the IBM SPSS Statistics 20.0. Results: The mean age of patients was 42.49 ± 14.83 years. The length of SP was measured over 30 mm in 151 patients (15.1%). A total of 151 CBCT showed ESP, of which 87 (57.6%) were noticed in males and 64 (42.4%) in female patients. The length of right-sided SP ranged from 30.05 to 85.49 mm and left-sided SP from 30.14 to 83.72 mm. Conclusion: CBCT is a valuable diagnostic imaging tool which makes accurate length measurements. It is important for the clinicians to be aware of natural variations of the SP whose clinical importance is not well understood.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):210-215
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_56_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Effect of clasp type and pullout location on clasp retention in different
           environment: In vitro study

    • Authors: Bilal Mourshed, Fuad Abdo Al-Sabri, Nashwan Ahmed Qaed, Nader Alaizari, Hashem Motahir Al-Shamiri, Amal Alfaqih
      Pages: 216 - 220
      Abstract: Bilal Mourshed, Fuad Abdo Al-Sabri, Nashwan Ahmed Qaed, Nader Alaizari, Hashem Motahir Al-Shamiri, Amal Alfaqih
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):216-220
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of pullout location and clasp types in two different environments to dislodge the clasp. Materials and Methods: Mandibular test models with natural premolars and molar teeth were used to test four types of clasp (each 12) (Akers, Rest plate Akers, Half and Half, and Ring clasp) with three different pullout location for each type (ring on the rest, loop on the saddle, and wax arising from both rests) in dry and natural fresh saliva environment. Each clasp was pulled out 10 times with a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min, and the force required to withdraw each was measured. Statistical Analysis Used: A one-way ANOVA and Tukey test were used. Results: The ring on the saddle pullout location has the highest retention force while ring on the rest was the lowest. In addition, ring clasp has the highest retention force. Conclusion: Clasp type and pullout location had a significant effect on the retentive force.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):216-220
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_70_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Hypochlorite solution for root canal irrigation that lacks a chlorinated
           odor

    • Authors: La-ongthong Vajrabhaya, Vanida Sangalungkarn, Ratchapin Srisatjaluk, Suwanna Korsuwannawong, Chareerut Phruksaniyom
      Pages: 221 - 225
      Abstract: La-ongthong Vajrabhaya, Vanida Sangalungkarn, Ratchapin Srisatjaluk, Suwanna Korsuwannawong, Chareerut Phruksaniyom
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):221-225
      Objectives: This is an in vitro study to develop a formulation of a hypochlorite solution for root canal irrigation that lacks a chlorinated odor. The antibacterial effect, tissue dissolution efficacy, and the cytotoxicity of the solution were assessed in cell culture and were compared with those of commercial sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solutions. Materials and Methods: Trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCA) was used as the source of hypochlorite ions in solution. All required properties of the NaOCl irrigant were evaluated and compared with those of original 2.5% NaOCl solutions currently in use. Results: Our results revealed that a TCA 3.5% + 1/6 Buffer-1 solution passed the short-term stability test. Moreover, no odor of chlorine gas was detected by three independent observers. The hypochlorite ion content and pH were stable over an incubation period of 4 weeks. The new solution did not differ from commercial products in terms of the dissolution property on bovine pulpal tissue (P > 0.05). Moreover, the antibacterial effect of this solution on Enterococcus faecalis did not differ from that of the commercial products (P > 0.05). In addition, our biocompatibility analysis demonstrated no difference among the tested solutions (P > 0.05). Conclusions: According to the results of all properties tested, TCA 3.5% + 1/6 Buffer-1 could be considered an option for NaOCl irrigation with the benefit of no detectable chlorine odor.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):221-225
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_354_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of salivary flow rate and gustatory function in HIV-positive
           patients with or without highly active antiretroviral therapy

    • Authors: Neha Verma, Ranjitkumar Patil, Vikram Khanna, Vandana Singh, Anurag Tripathi
      Pages: 226 - 231
      Abstract: Neha Verma, Ranjitkumar Patil, Vikram Khanna, Vandana Singh, Anurag Tripathi
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):226-231
      Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the salivary flow rate and gustatory changes in HIV-positive patients on highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) and without HAART. We also correlated CD4 count and salivary flow rate and gustatory function in both groups. Methods: Sample size for each group was thirty. After obtaining informed consent, we measured salivary flow rate using Schimer's method and gustatory function using four tastants (sweet, sour, bitter, and salty) of different concentrations. The readings were recorded at 0 month, 2nd, 4th, and 6th month interval. The data obtained was statistically analyzed. Results: The mean salivary flow rate was decreased more in Group I as compared to Group II. The mean identification score for sweet, salty, sour, and bitter was significantly higher in Group II than Group I. The mean detection threshold score for sweet, salty, sour and bitter taste was comparatively higher in Group I than Group II. The Pearson's correlation analysis showed inverse relation between age and salivary flow rate in Group II. No significant correlation was observed in CD4 count and salivary flow rate. Conclusion: Along with routine oral health appraisal in seropositive patients, evaluation of salivary flow rate, and taste abnormalities should also be considered an integral part of patient assessment.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):226-231
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_289_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of knowledge among general dentists in treatment of traumatic
           injuries in primary teeth: A cross-sectional questionnaire study

    • Authors: Dhanalakshmi Ravikumar, Ganesh Jeevanandan, E M. G Subramanian
      Pages: 232 - 237
      Abstract: Dhanalakshmi Ravikumar, Ganesh Jeevanandan, E M. G Subramanian
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):232-237
      Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the knowledge of General dentist regarding the management of dental traumatic injuries of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 general dentists were selected and a validated questionnaire was distributed among the dentist to assess their knowledge on treatment strategies regarding traumatized primary teeth. Statistical Analysis: Data were entered into SPSS version 20.0 for percentages. The correct answers were tested in relation to the dentists' years of experience using the Chi-square test. Results: Analyzing the questionnaire for knowledge, 49% of dentists answered accurately regarding avulsed primary teeth, 36% of dentists answered appropriately regarding crown and root fractures, and 55% of dentists gave appropriate answers regarding luxation injuries. Chi-square test showed a statistically significant difference only for 2 questions in relation to the dentist's years of experience (P < 0.05). Conclusion: There is a lack of consistency in the knowledge among general dentist regarding traumatic dental injuries of primary teeth. There is a need to create awareness and education regarding traumatic injuries of primary teeth.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):232-237
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_357_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Dentition status and treatment needs of human immunodeficiency
           virus-positive patients on anti retro viral therapy in Raichur taluk,
           Karnataka, India: A cross sectional study

    • Authors: Shrikanth Muralidharan, Arunkumar Acharya, Shanthi Margabandhu
      Pages: 238 - 241
      Abstract: Shrikanth Muralidharan, Arunkumar Acharya, Shanthi Margabandhu
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):238-241
      Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the dentition status and the treatment needs of the HIV-positive patients on ART for more than a year in Raichur, Karnataka. Materials and Methods: Convenience sampling was followed. The sample size was 170. The dentition status and treatment needs of the patients were recorded as per the WHO guidelines. Results: The overall prevalence of dental caries was 79.4%. Males had higher percentage of dental caries than the females, and this was found to be statistically significant. The prevalence of dental caries was higher among the participants who used finger to clean their teeth compared to the toothbrush, neem stick, and charcoal users, and this was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: Higher prevalence of dental caries was observed among the study population. Most of them required some type of treatment. Patients with a low CD4 count required higher treatments than the others.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):238-241
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_290_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of dimensional accuracy for different complete edentulous
           impressions immersed in different disinfectant solutions

    • Authors: Hussein Abdelfattah Ismail, Hamada Z Mahross, Suaad Shikho
      Pages: 242 - 249
      Abstract: Hussein Abdelfattah Ismail, Hamada Z Mahross, Suaad Shikho
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):242-249
      Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of two different disinfectant solutions' immersion on the dimensional accuracy of different complete edentulous impressions. Materials and Methods: A specific custom-made metallic cast template was constructed and used for making both 120 alginate and zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) paste impressions (60 for each). Disinfectants with 1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde were used for 10 and 60 min immersion of both impressions. After immersion time, the impressions were used for constructing 120 completely edentulous master stone models and divided into different groups according to the study. An electronic caliper was used for dimensional accuracy measurements of the casts. The data were collected and statistically analyzed according to the independent paired sample t-test at statistically significant level P< 0 05. One-way ANOVA test was used to compare between significant different groups. Results: There is no statistically significant difference in dimensional accuracy of alginate and ZOE paste impressions as disinfection with 1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde for 10 min and ZOE paste impressions for 60 min, where there is statistically significant difference in alginate impressions dimensional accuracy as disinfection with 1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde for 60 min. Conclusions: Possibility of ZOE impressions paste disinfected with 1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde for 10 or 60 min, not affecting on dimensional stability, while alginate impressions, only 10 min immersion in disinfectant not affecting the dimensional stability.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):242-249
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_268_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Size discrepancies in molars and first key to optimal occlusion

    • Authors: Ahmet Arif Celebi, Sam H Lee, Chung How Kau
      Pages: 250 - 252
      Abstract: Ahmet Arif Celebi, Sam H Lee, Chung How Kau
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):250-252
      Objective: The aim of this research project was to determine whether the sizes of the first molars allow clinicians to achieve the first goal of an ideal clinical outcome. Material and Methods: Seventy-eight sets of dental casts that have been presented to the American Board of Orthodontics were evaluated. A Boley gauge was used to measure the length from the mesiobuccal cusp to the distobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar and the length from the mesiobuccal groove of the mandibular first molar to the occlusal embrasure between the mandibular first and second molars. These two measurements were taken on both sides of each set of dental casts for a total of four measurements per set. Results: The maxillary measurements ranged from 3.6 to 6.9 mm with an average of 5.2 mm. The mandibular measurements ranged from 5.0 to 8.0 mm with an average of 6.5 mm. The data were tested for normality and found to be equally distributed. A t-test revealed significant differences in tooth sizes between maxillary and mandibular first molars on both sides. On average, the mesiodistal length measured on maxillary first molars was about 80% of that of their mandibular counterparts. Only 5 of the 78 sets of dental casts evaluated had equal maxillary and mandibular measurements on one side (either left or right), and none of them had equal measurements on both sides. Conclusion: Clinicians have to understand that tooth size discrepancies do exist in patients and that these discrepancies make the completion of a perfect case challenging.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):250-252
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_339_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Anterosuperior rehabilitation with metal-free fixed prosthesis based on
           zirconia

    • Authors: Sthelen Nayara Cenci, Igor Alessandro Gontarsky, Marcella Goetz Moro, Lidia Olga Bach Pinheiro, Adriana Postiglione B&#252;hrer Samra
      Pages: 253 - 257
      Abstract: Sthelen Nayara Cenci, Igor Alessandro Gontarsky, Marcella Goetz Moro, Lidia Olga Bach Pinheiro, Adriana Postiglione Bührer Samra
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):253-257
      The loss of upper front dental elements causes functional and psychosocial problems to the affected individuals. In this case report, the treatment planning considered hard and soft tissue loss for a complex fixed partial denture (FPD) rehabilitation. The six-element, all-ceramic FPD was manufactured using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system with zirconia framework, veneered with leucite-reinforced ceramic. Ceramic artificial gum was also produced to guarantee tooth-facial proportions as well as lip support, promoting both esthetics and phonetics. The material's mechanical properties allowed for the coupling of the esthetic and mechanical requirements, proving an alternative to the well-established metal-ceramic technology, optimizing biomimetic. One of the endodontic-treated abutment teeth required a radicular retainer with cast metal post, but because of the opacity of zirconia, the esthetics of the prosthesis was not compromised. The low silica content of high resistance ceramics such as zirconia hampers the adhesive cementation, with numerous studies advocating for different cementation protocols, with no clear scientific consensus so far. In the present case, the internal surface of the FPD was initially blasted with aluminum oxide, followed by the application of a universal adhesive system containing 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate. Finally, cementation to the dental structure was conducted with dual-cure self-adhesive resin cement.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):253-257
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_57_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • A case of tooth fracture occurred upon medicating bisphosphonate for an
           elderly person: Preservation therapy and responses for Stage 0 of
           bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw

    • Authors: Noriko Suzuki, Hitoshi Oguchi, Yu Yamauchi, Yasuyo Karube, Yukimi Suzuki, Noriyasu Hosoya
      Pages: 258 - 263
      Abstract: Noriko Suzuki, Hitoshi Oguchi, Yu Yamauchi, Yasuyo Karube, Yukimi Suzuki, Noriyasu Hosoya
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):258-263
      This case report aimed to report the progress of preservation therapy and response of symptoms and signs for Stage 0 of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw (BRONJ). A 68-year-old female was recognized having a tooth at the left upper first molar fracture upon medicating bisphosphonate (BP) in 2007. At that time, the extraction of the tooth was an absolute contraindication. Therefore, we performed preservation therapy. We observed the symptoms and signs every month. After 5 months, swelling and redness in the entire first molar tooth were seen and fistula formed partly. Bone exposure was not seen. We administrated antibiotics immediately. As a result, symptoms disappeared. On April 10, 2009, the patient visited us as she felt a sense of incongruity in the lower left first and second molar teeth. Clinically, there were no symptoms of pain. However, we observed the radiolucent finding in about 5 mm diameter at apical position by X-ray photography; we considered a possibility of Stage 0 for BRONJ. We immediately administered medicine for 5 days and the symptoms disappeared. At present, no inflammation with signs and symptoms at the upper left first molar and lower left first, second molar parts is shown. We performed preservation therapy for tooth fracture case medicating of BP. Immediate responses for inflammation and symptoms of the Stage 0 of BRONJ have led to success. Hence, dentists should perform regular clinical observation, and enough education to the patient for BRONJ is necessary.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):258-263
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_264_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Dental treatment considerations for a pediatric patient with incontinentia
           pigmenti (Bloch-Sulzberger syndrome)

    • Authors: Amy Yi-Ling Chen, Kevin Chen
      Pages: 264 - 267
      Abstract: Amy Yi-Ling Chen, Kevin Chen
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):264-267
      Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is a uncommon gene disorder, heritage with X-linked dominant mode. IP patients have a characteristic dentition varying from marked hypodontia to delayed eruption and conical crowns on both dentitions. A 5½-year-old girl, whose mother and younger sister were also diagnosed with IP, has the whirling-like pigmented skin lesion over her trunk and four extremities. Four primary teeth and multiple permanent tooth germs were found to be congenital missing. Dental considerations of further treatment were discussed with her parents including the preservation of primary molars, possible interim prosthesis in mixed or permanent dentition, full mouth rehabilitation with orthodontic and prosthodontic combined treatment, and implant therapy in adulthood. Early and longitudinal involvement of pediatric dentist to deal with the dental complications of IP can not only solve the esthetic problem and oral function but also maintain the oral health of children with IP to adulthood.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):264-267
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_95_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Evidence provided for the use of oscillating instruments in restorative
           dentistry: A systematic review

    • Authors: Panagiotis Ntovas, Spyridon Doukoudakis, John Tzoutzas, Panagiotis Lagouvardos
      Pages: 268 - 272
      Abstract: Panagiotis Ntovas, Spyridon Doukoudakis, John Tzoutzas, Panagiotis Lagouvardos
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):268-272
      Oscillating diamond instruments are considered gentle sources for the removal of demineralized tooth hard tissues and the preparation of cavity angles and margins needed in minimally invasive dentistry. However, there is a question if literature provides enough evidence for their efficacy in restorative dentistry procedures. A literature search until May 2016 was conducted, using PubMed, Scopus, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. The quality of the studies was assessed using the recommendation of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. Fifty-five studies were finally included in the study. Of which, 78.2% of them were laboratory studies and only 21.8% were clinical studies. The strength of recommendation was 5 for most of them and D their grade of evidence. Bond strength of adhesives on surfaces prepared with these instruments, effective caries removal and cutting characteristics of the oscillating instruments were the main targets of the studies. Conventional diamond, steel, and chemical vapor deposition diamond tips and systems based on abrasive slurry were the oscillating tips, used in different studies. The strength of recommendation and grade of evidence of the studies were low. Although these devices seem to be useful for many clinical situations, there is a need for more well-structured evidence-based studies with more widely accepted procedures and common devices, to have more meaningful results and conclusions of higher strength.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(2):268-272
      PubDate: Mon,19 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_232_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2017)
       
 
 
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