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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 356 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 356 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access  
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access  
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access  
Heart Views     Open Access  
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access  
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)

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Journal Cover European Journal of Dentistry
  [SJR: 0.496]   [H-I: 11]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1305-7456 - ISSN (Online) 1305-7464
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [356 journals]
  • Effectiveness of audiovisual distraction with computerized delivery of
           anesthesia during the placement of stainless steel crowns in children with
           Down syndrome

    • Authors: Kausar Sadia Fakhruddin, Hisham El Batawi, MO Gorduysus
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Kausar Sadia Fakhruddin, Hisham El Batawi, MO Gorduysus
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):1-5
      Objective: Assessing effectiveness of audiovisual (AV) distraction with/without video eyewear and computerized delivery system-intrasulcular (CDS-IS) for local anesthesia during placement of stainless steel crowns for the management of pathological tooth grinding in children with Down syndrome. Materials and Methods: This clinical study includes 22 children (13 boys and 9 girls), with mean age being 7.1 years. The study involved three sessions 1-week apart. During Session I, dental prophylaxis to the upper jaw was done while watching a movie projected on the ceiling without video eyewear whereas prophylaxis for the lower jaw and impressions of both jaws were taken while watching another movie using eyewear projection. After 1 week, during Session II/III, children had their upper and lower second primary molars which were prepared and steel crowns inserted, respectively, while watching movies which were projected using video eyewear under the effect of CDS-IS local anesthesia. Changes in pulse oximeter and heart rate were recorded every 5 min. Independent sample t-test was used to assess significance of changes during each visit. Results: A statistically significant difference (P < 0.03) was observed in mean pulse rate between dental prophylaxis without video eyewear and during dental prophylaxis and dental impression taken while children were distracted using AV distracter with video eyewear. We observed an increase in mean pulse rate during tooth preparation use dental drills, but this does not lead to disruptive behavior as children were being distracted by AV distracter with video eyewear. Conclusion: Routine psychological (Tell-Show-Do) intervention along with visual distraction using video eyewear and use of CDS-IS system for anesthetic delivery is recommended as an effective behavior management technique for children with Down syndrome during invasive dental treatment.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):1-5
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_288_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Effect of cleaning agent, primer application and their combination on the
           bond strength of a resin cement to two yttrium-tetragonal zirconia
           polycrystal zirconia ceramics

    • Authors: William Matthew Negreiros, Glaucia Maria Bovi Ambrosano, Marcelo Giannini
      Pages: 6 - 11
      Abstract: William Matthew Negreiros, Glaucia Maria Bovi Ambrosano, Marcelo Giannini
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):6-11
      Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of a cleaning agent and priming on the bond strength (BS) of a resin cement (RC) to zirconia ceramics after 24 h and 1 year of water-storage. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six Katana and 56 ZirCAD zirconia ceramic plates were prepared and each zirconia brand was divided into four groups (n = 14): (1) untreated; (2) treated with Ivoclean cleaning agent; (3) treated with Monobond Plus coupling agent; (4) treated with Ivoclean + Monobond Plus. Cleaning and coupling agents were applied to zirconia following the manufacturers' instructions. The RC was manipulated, inserted into tubes (0.75 mm diameter/1 mm height) that were positioned on the zirconia surfaces and light activated. Specimens were tested after 24 h and 1 year of water storage. A shear load was applied to the base of the RC cylinders (until failure. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 5%). Results: No significant difference in BS was noted between zirconia ceramics, except when the combination of cleaning and coupling agents was used. This combination increased the BS for Katana zirconia. One year of water storage leads to a decrease in BS for all experimental groups. Conclusion: The combination of cleaning agent and priming can yield higher BS for Katana at 24 h. BS to zirconia ceramics reduced approximately 50% after 1 year.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):6-11
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_276_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Comparative antimicrobial efficacy of selected root canal irrigants on
           commonly isolated microorganisms in endodontic infection

    • Authors: Sandeep Dubey, Suparna Ganguly Saha, Balakrishnan Rajkumar, Tapan Kumar Dhole
      Pages: 12 - 16
      Abstract: Sandeep Dubey, Suparna Ganguly Saha, Balakrishnan Rajkumar, Tapan Kumar Dhole
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):12-16
      Objective: This study aims to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial efficacy of three selected root canal irrigants (BioPure MTAD, metronidazole, aztreonam) against microbes commonly isolated from polymicrobial microbiota of root canal infection. Materials and Methods: This study was designed with four experimental groups (Group I - Bacteroides fragilis, Group II - Propionibacterium acnes, Group III - Enterococcus faecalis, Group IV - Candida albicans) based on the microbes selected for the study. Group I and Group II bacteria were used to compare and evaluate antimicrobial effect of BioPure MTAD, metronidazole, aztreonam, and normal saline. Group III and Group IV bacteria were used to compare and evaluate antimicrobial efficacy of BioPure MTAD, aztreonam, and normal saline. Normal saline was used as a control irrigant in this study. Agar disc diffusion method was applied to assess and compare the antimicrobial action of selected irrigants. Results: Metronidazole was found to be the most effective root canal irrigant against B. fragilis and P. acnes among the tested irrigants. Mean zone of inhibition against E. faecalis has been shown to be maximum by BioPure MTAD, followed by aztreonam. Antifungal effect against C. albicans was only shown by BioPure MTAD. Conclusions: Overall, BioPure MTAD is the most effective root canal irrigant as it has shown an antibacterial effect against all the tested microorganisms. However, metronidazole showed maximum antibacterial effect against obligate anaerobes. Aztreonam also showed an antibacterial effect in the present study, raising its possibility to be used as a root canal irrigant in the future.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):12-16
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_141_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The confidence of undergraduate dental students in Saudi Arabia in
           performing endodontic treatment

    • Authors: Mothanna Alrahabi
      Pages: 17 - 21
      Abstract: Mothanna Alrahabi
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):17-21
      Objective: This study examined the endodontic experience, perceptions of endodontic practice, and self-rated confidence of dental students enrolled in Taibah University, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to 41 undergraduate dental students registered in endodontic courses in the 2015 academic year. The questionnaire evaluated their confidence performing nonsurgical root canal treatment. The level of confidence was classified using a 5-point scale as “very confident,” “confident,” “neutral,” “not very confident,” or “not at all confident.” The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Results: The participation rate was 93%. The maxillary incisor was the most common first tooth treated. The students were relatively confident, but their confidence levels were lower regarding endodontic radiology, evaluation of root canal obturation, and determining the correct recall period for the patient. Conclusion: The confidence of undergraduates in endodontics must be enhanced to increase their clinical competence when performing root canal treatment.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):17-21
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_190_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Effects of delivering the same radiant exposures at 730, 1450, and 2920
           mW/cm2 to two resin-based composites

    • Authors: Maan M AlShaafi
      Pages: 22 - 28
      Abstract: Maan M AlShaafi
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):22-28
      Objective: To evaluate the effects of curing two resin-based composites (RBC) with the same radiant exposures at 730, 1450, and 2920 mW/cm2. Materials and Methods: Two types of RBC, Filtek Supreme Ultra and Tetric-EvoCeram-Bulk Fill, were light-cured to deliver the same radiant exposures for 5, 10, or 20 s by means of a modified Valo light emitted diode light-curing unit with the light tip placed directly over each specimen. The RBC was expressed into metal rings that were 2.0 and 4.0 mm in thickness, directly on an attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared plate heated to 33°C, and the degree of conversion (DC) of the RBC was recorded. The specimens were then removed and the Knoop microhardness (KHN) was tested at both the bottom and the top of each specimen. The KHN was tested again after 24 h and 7 days of storage in the dark at 37°C and 100% humidity. The DC and KHN results were analyzed with Fisher's protected least significant difference at α = 0.05. Results: The DC values for the specimens cured at the three different irradiance levels were similar. However, at different depths, there were differences in the DC values. In general, there were no clear differences among the samples cured in the three different groups, and the KHN was always greater 24 h and 7 days later (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Despite the curing time, and as long as the samples were cured with the same radiant exposures, there were no significant effects on the DC and KHN of both RBCs.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):22-28
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_270_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Awareness about the effects of tobacco consumption on oral health and the
           possibility of smoking behavior among male Saudi schoolchildren

    • Authors: Muhammad Ashraf Nazir, Khalid Almas
      Pages: 29 - 35
      Abstract: Muhammad Ashraf Nazir, Khalid Almas
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):29-35
      Objective: To investigate an association between the awareness about the effects of tobacco consumption on oral health and the likelihood of smoking among male schoolchildren. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted using a multistage random sampling technique. The participants (ages 15–19 years) were recruited from male public high schools in Greater Dammam in Saudi Arabia. A pretested questionnaire inquired participants' awareness about the effects of smoking on oral health. SPSS (Released 2013, IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 22.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp) was used to calculate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Multiple logistic regression and interaction analyses were performed to identify the factors associated with the probability of smoking behavior among children. Results: More than 69.9% (n = 277) of participants were aware of the adverse effects of tobacco consumption on oral health which included poor oral health, bad taste and breath, periodontal disease, dental caries, oral ulcers, and oral cancers. The odds of smoking were 22%–47% lower among schoolchildren who were aware of the consequences of smoking on oral health than those who were unaware of these complications. The students who believed that smoking can cause oral ulcers and negatively affects oral health had a lower probability of smoking (OR: 0.414; CI: 0.201–0.50) and (OR: 0.433; CI: 0.194–0.965), respectively in comparison with those who thought that smoking had no such negative impacts. Conclusions: Schoolchildren with increased awareness of smoking effects on oral health were less likely to smoke. Educating students about the complications of smoking on oral health should be the part of smoking cessation programs and policies.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):29-35
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_300_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Lightness, chroma, and hue distributions in natural teeth measured by a
           spectrophotometer

    • Authors: Teuta Pustina-Krasniqi, Kujtim Shala, Gloria Staka, Teuta Bicaj, Enis Ahmedi, Linda Dula
      Pages: 36 - 40
      Abstract: Teuta Pustina-Krasniqi, Kujtim Shala, Gloria Staka, Teuta Bicaj, Enis Ahmedi, Linda Dula
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):36-40
      Objective: The aim of the study was to analyze the distribution of color parameters, lightness (L*), chroma (C), hue (H), a* and b*, in the intercanine sector in maxilla. Material and Methods: Patients' tooth color measurements were performed using an intraoral spectrophotometer VITA Easyshade® (VITA Zahnfabrik H. Rauter GmbH and Co. KG, Bad Sackingen, Germany). The measurements were made in 255 subjects in the intercanine sector in maxilla. Results: The mean values for the group of 255 subjects were as follows: L*, a*, b*, C, and H as 81.6, 0.67, 21.6, 21.7, and 92.7, respectively. For F=206.27 and P < 0.001 between L*, a*, b*, C, H, and central incisor/lateral incisor/canines, there were statistically significant differences. Conclusion: With the statistical analysis, it was determined that there are significant color differences between the teeth of the intercanine sector, which differences are clinically significant also.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):36-40
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1305-7456.202635
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Influence of reuse and cervical preflaring on the fracture strength of
           reciprocating instruments

    • Authors: Claudio Maniglia-Ferreira, Fabio de Almeida Gomes, Tatyana Ximenes, Murilo Alves Teixeira Neto, Thiane Elys Arruda, Giovani Gon&#231;alves Ribamar, Luis Fl&#225;vio Gaspar Herculano
      Pages: 41 - 47
      Abstract: Claudio Maniglia-Ferreira, Fabio de Almeida Gomes, Tatyana Ximenes, Murilo Alves Teixeira Neto, Thiane Elys Arruda, Giovani Gonçalves Ribamar, Luis Flávio Gaspar Herculano
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):41-47
      Objective: This study sought to assess the influence of cervical preflaring and reuse after resterilization, on fracture strength and plastic deformation and/or surface cracking in reciprocating nickel–titanium [NiTi] endodontic instruments after root canal instrumentation of extracted human teeth. Materials and Methods: Forty engine-driven reciprocating NiTi instruments (20 Reciproc® [RC], VDW; 20 WaveOne® [WO], Dentsply) were used in root canal instrumentation of extracted human molars. A total of 485 human upper molars with similar anatomical features were selected and randomly distributed across four groups according to the instrumentation procedures performed (G1 and G3: RC; G2 and G4: WO). Reciprocating instruments were used as per manufacturer instructions. In groups G3 and G4, cervical preflaring was performed prior to instrumentation. After each use of each instrument, sterilization was repeated and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were obtained to check for plastic deformations and/or cracks on instrument surfaces. Each instrument was used repeatedly until fracture occurred. Results: Regardless of flaring, RC files exhibited greater fracture strength than WO instruments (P<0.01) with and without preflaring. Cervical preflaring significantly reduced the risk of instrument fracture (P<0.01). No plastic deformations were observed before fracturing. However, cracks were found on WO instruments shortly after their first use. RC and WO instruments resisted fracturing after autoclave sterilization. Conclusions: Cervical preflaring allowed a significant increase in the number of times RC and WO files could be reused safely.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):41-47
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_272_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Can onlay's be an alternative restoration for severely damaged
           primary teeth

    • Authors: Begum Gok Coban, Zuhal Kirzioglu, Ayse Ceren Altun
      Pages: 48 - 52
      Abstract: Begum Gok Coban, Zuhal Kirzioglu, Ayse Ceren Altun
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):48-52
      Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate indirect compomer and composite resin onlay restorations of severely damaged primary molars in vivo. Materials and Methods: At the study, 48 restorations, in seven girls and ten boys totally 17 patients aged 4–8, was evaluated clinically with using USPHS criteria for 15 months. Results: The study results revealed that the clinical success rate of compomer and composite onlay restorations was 79% and 96%, respectively. No significant differences were found statistically between the materials. Conclusions: In the children severely damaged primary molars, onlays are usually worked with an indirect technique in clinics. One of the advantages of indirect technique is being most similar to its original form morphologically.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):48-52
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1305-7456.202616
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial efficacy of triple antibiotic
           paste, calcium hydroxide, and a proton pump inhibitor against resistant
           root canal pathogens

    • Authors: Shibha Mehta, Promila Verma, Aseem Prakash Tikku, Anil Chandra, Rhythm Bains, Gopa Banerjee
      Pages: 53 - 57
      Abstract: Shibha Mehta, Promila Verma, Aseem Prakash Tikku, Anil Chandra, Rhythm Bains, Gopa Banerjee
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):53-57
      Objective: The objective of this study is to compare the antimicrobial efficacy of triple antibiotic paste (TAP) and a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) (omeprazole) in combination with calcium hydroxide (CH) against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: E. faecalis and C. albicans were subcultured and inoculated at 37° overnight and were treated with different dilutions of TAP, 25 μg/ml (Group 1), CH (Group 2, control), CH 16 mg/ml + omeprazole 2 mg/ml (Group 3a) (CH 16 mg/ml + omeprazole 4 mg)/ml (Group 3b) for 24, 48, and 72 h in sterile uncoated 96-well microtiter plates. Minimum concentration at which the medicaments produced least optical density was determined using ELISA reader (ELx 808 BioTek Inc., USA) device set at optical density of 630 nm. Results were analyzed statistically by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's multiple comparison tests. The significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Mean concentration (irrespective of time) for TAP at which mean minimum optical density was recorded at 1.25 μg/ml (1:20 dilution) and 25 μg/ml (0 dilution) against E. faecalis and C. albicans, respectively. Least optical density for CH plus PPI group was obtained 1.6 μg/ml (1:10 dilution) and 16 μg/ml (0 dilution) for E. faecalis and C. albicans, respectively. However, CH alone showed a weaker antimicrobial action against either of the strains even at full concentration. Conclusions: PPI enhanced the antibacterial efficacy of CH against E. faecalis and C. albicans. However, TAP showed the best antibacterial property followed by CH plus PPIs against both the selected strains.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):53-57
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_159_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • “Ormocer an innovative technology”: A replacement for
           conventional cements and veneer? A comparative in vitro analysis

    • Authors: Vini Rajeev, Rajeev Arunachalam, Sanjna Nayar, PR Arunima, Sivadas Ganapathy, Vaishnavi Vedam
      Pages: 58 - 63
      Abstract: Vini Rajeev, Rajeev Arunachalam, Sanjna Nayar, PR Arunima, Sivadas Ganapathy, Vaishnavi Vedam
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):58-63
      Objective: This in vitro study was designed to assess shear bond strength (SBS) of ormocer flowable (OF) resin as a luting agent, ormocer as an indirect veneer material with portrayal of modes of failures using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Sixty maxillary central incisors were divided into Group I, II, and III with 20 samples each based on luting cement used. They were OF, self-adhesive (SA) cement, and total etch (TE) cement. These groups were subdivided into “a” and “b” of ten each based on the type of veneering materials used. Veneer discs were fabricated using Ormocer restorative (O) and pressable ceramic (C). Specimens were thermocycled and loaded under universal testing machine for SBS. The statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA post hoc Tukey honest significant difference method. Results: A significant difference was observed between the Groups I and II (P < 0.05). The highest mean bond strength when using ormocer veneer was obtained with the Group Ia (19.11 ± 1.92 Mpa) and lowest by Group IIa (8.1 ± 1.04 Mpa), whereas the highest mean bond strength while using ceramic veneer was of similar range for Group Ib (18.04 ± 4.08 Mpa) and Group IIIb (18.07 ± 1.40 Mpa). SEM analysis revealed OF and TE presented mixed type of failure when compared with SA where failure mode was totally adhesive. Conclusion: OF was found equally efficient like TE. Bond strength of ormocer as a veneer was not inferior to ceramic making it one of the promising additions in the field of dentistry.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):58-63
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_113_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Correlation between frontal sinus dimensions and cephalometric indices: A
           cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Azita Tehranchi, Saeed Reza Motamedian, Sara Saedi, Sattar Kabiri, Shireen Shidfar
      Pages: 64 - 70
      Abstract: Azita Tehranchi, Saeed Reza Motamedian, Sara Saedi, Sattar Kabiri, Shireen Shidfar
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):64-70
      Objective: Growth prediction plays a significant role in accurate diagnosis and treatment planning of orthodontics patients. It was hypothesized that the unique pattern of pneumatization of the frontal sinus as a component of craniofacial structure would influence the skeletal growth pattern and may be used as a growth predictor. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 subjects (78 females and 66 males) with a mean age of 19.26 ± 4.66 years were included in this retrospective study. Posterior-anterior and lateral cephalograms (LCs) were used to measure the frontal sinus dimensions. The skeletal growth pattern and relations of craniofacial structures were analyzed on LC using variables for sagittal and vertical analyses. Correlation between the frontal sinus dimensions and cephalometric indices was assessed by the Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: The SN-FH and SNA angles had significant associations with frontal sinus dimensions in all enrolled subjects (P < 0.05). In males, the SN-FH, sum of posterior angles, Pal-SN, and Jarabak index were significantly associated with the size of frontal sinus (P < 0.05). In females, the associations of SN-FH and gonial angles with frontal sinus dimensions were significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results show that larger size of frontal sinus was associated with reduced inclination of the anterior cranial base, increased anterior facial height (in males), and increased gonial angle (in females) in the study population.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):64-70
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1305-7456.202630
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • In vitro comparative evaluation of different storage media (hank's
           balanced salt solution, propolis, Aloe vera, and pomegranate juice) for
           preservation of avulsed tooth

    • Authors: Prashant Babaji, Mahesh Melkundi, Raghu Devanna, BS Suresh, Vishwajit Rampratap Chaurasia, PV Gopinath
      Pages: 71 - 75
      Abstract: Prashant Babaji, Mahesh Melkundi, Raghu Devanna, BS Suresh, Vishwajit Rampratap Chaurasia, PV Gopinath
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):71-75
      Objectives: Prognosis of the avulsed teeth is mostly affected by extraoral dry period and storage medium used to store teeth before reimplantation. However, ability of storage media can affect cell viability and success of treatment. Various storage media were tried with some success. The present study was undertaken to comparatively evaluate the efficacy of hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS), propolis, Aloe vera, and pomegranate juice (PJ) in preserving the vitality of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells of avulsed teeth. Materials and Methods: Fifty orthodontically extracted sound teeth with healthy PDL were selected for the present study. Selected teeth were randomly divided into study groups (10 in each) and 5 each as positive and negative control groups. All the teeth were immersed immediately after extraction into respective storage media. Data were statistically analyzed using IBM SPSS software for Windows, Version 19.0., IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA. Analysis of variance and multiple range were done using Tukey's honestly significant difference with level of significance at 5% (P > 0.05). Results: Propolis (285,000 viable cells with standard deviation 4.11028 and standard error of 1.38097) showed more viable PDL cells followed by HBSS, A. vera, and PJ. Conclusion: Propolis, A. vera, and PJ can be used as an alternative tooth storage media.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):71-75
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_101_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Facial profile and maxillary arch dimensions in unilateral cleft lip and
           palate children in the mixed dentition stage

    • Authors: Vellore Kannan Gopinath, Ab Rani Samsudin, Siti Noor Fazliah Mohd Noor, Hady Youssef Mohamed Sharab
      Pages: 76 - 82
      Abstract: Vellore Kannan Gopinath, Ab Rani Samsudin, Siti Noor Fazliah Mohd Noor, Hady Youssef Mohamed Sharab
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):76-82
      Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the vertical and sagittal facial profile and maxillary arch width, depth, and length of patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and to compare them with healthy noncleft children in the mixed dentition stage (7–13 years). Materials and Methods: This study is conducted at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. UCLP group comprised 48 patients with nonsyndromic UCLP who have had the lip and palate repaired, whereas the control group comprised 48 healthy noncleft cases. The lateral cephalometrics measurements were used to determine the vertical height, sagittal depth of the face, and cranial base length and angle. Maxillary arch dimensions were measured on the study cast including arch width, depth, and length. Results: Vertical facial height and sagittal depth measurements showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the mean growth pattern in UCLP group. The anterior cranial base length (S-N) was shorter in UCLP children (P < 0.001), while Ba-N length had no significant difference (P = 0.639). Nasion-Sella Tursica-Basion angle was significantly higher in the UCLP group (P = 0.016). Dental arch width with reference to canine-to-canine and first premolar-to- first premolar distance was significantly larger in control (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Mean vertical and sagittal facial dimensions in the UCLP children who do not undergo orthodontic treatment are significantly lesser in all directions of growth than healthy noncleft children. The maxillary dental arch had a normal depth but constricted in width and arch length.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):76-82
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_238_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Attitude and knowledge of isolation in operative field among undergraduate
           dental students

    • Authors: Fuad Abdo Al-Sabri, Ahmed Mohamed Elmarakby, Ahmed Mohammed Hassan
      Pages: 83 - 88
      Abstract: Fuad Abdo Al-Sabri, Ahmed Mohamed Elmarakby, Ahmed Mohammed Hassan
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):83-88
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the general attitude of undergraduate dental students toward rubber dam use, specifically focusing on operative procedures before starting to serve community. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed to undergraduate clinical years' students of two private colleges; Al-Farabi Dental College, Riyadh, KSA and Buraidah Private Colleges, Qassim, KSA. Questions were asked about areas where the students used rubber dam in operative procedures, in which types of caries classes, and in which type of restoration they frequently used the rubber dam. Results: We found that students of both private dental colleges agreed with the opinions that proper isolation cannot be achieved for the restoration of operative procedures without using rubber dam and restoration placed under rubber dam have a greater longevity than those placed without. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the perceptions of dental students on rubber dam need to be improved and strategies should be developed so that this valuable adjunct will comprise one of the indispensable elements of dental care.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):83-88
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_191_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Histologic evaluation of the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate-Fillapex
           as a root canal sealer in rat teeth submitted to late replantation

    • Authors: Manuel Marques Ferreira, Maria Filomena Botelho, Margarida Abrantes, Lina Carvalho, Eunice Carrilho
      Pages: 89 - 93
      Abstract: Manuel Marques Ferreira, Maria Filomena Botelho, Margarida Abrantes, Lina Carvalho, Eunice Carrilho
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):89-93
      Objective: This study aims to analyze the effect of new root canal based silicate cement, in rat teeth after late replantation, comparing with calcium hydroxide (CH) in preventing tooth root resorption. Materials and Methods: The study group included 16 Wistar rats in which the upper right central incisors were extracted and were left on a worktable for 60 min, simulating a case of tooth avulsion, after had been anesthetized. One group, (Group I), the canals were filled with CH past, before replantation. The second groups of teeth, (Group II), the canals were filled with mineral trioxide aggregate-Fillapex (MTAF). After removal, the blood clot of the socket, with saline solution irrigation, the teeth were replanted into their original socket, and splinted with silk 3/0. The rats were sacrificed 8 weeks after replantation and the specimens were prepared for histologic and histomorphometric analyses. The areas of inflammatory and replacement resorptions were selected and quantified. These data for each group of teeth were evaluated and analyzed using the Mann–Whitney test (P = 0.05). Result and Conclusion: All the replanted teeth in both groups survived. Although root canal filled with MTAF provide better results than with CH past concerning inflammatory and replacement resorption, there was no statistical difference (P = 0.527).
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):89-93
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_106_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Comparative clinical efficacy of three toothpastes in the control of
           supragingival calculus formation

    • Authors: Petcharat Kraivaphan, Cholticha Amornchat
      Pages: 94 - 98
      Abstract: Petcharat Kraivaphan, Cholticha Amornchat
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):94-98
      Objectives: The purpose of this double-blind, parallel clinical study was to assess clinical efficacy in supragingival calculus formation reduction using Abhaibhubejhr Herbal Toothpaste compared to Colgate Total and Colgate Cavity Protection toothpastes. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 subjects participated in the pretest phase. All subjects were given oral soft/hard tissue evaluation, calculus examination using Volpe-Manhold calculus, and whole mouth oral prophylaxis. They received noncalculus control fluoride toothpaste and a soft-bristled toothbrush to brush for 1 min two times daily for 8 weeks. After which, subjects were given a test phase oral soft/hard tissue evaluation and calculus examination and were randomized into one of the three toothpaste groups. All subjects in the test phase received a whole mouth oral prophylaxis and were given their assigned toothpaste and a soft-bristled toothbrush to brush for 1 min two times a day for 12 weeks. Thereafter, subjects were assessed for their oral soft/hard tissue and calculus formation. Results: Mean Volpe-Manhold calculus index scores for the Cavity Protection, Abhaibhubejhr, and Total toothpaste groups were 0.78, 0.62, and 0.48, respectively, at the 12-week test phase evaluation. Abhaibhubejhr and Total toothpaste groups show 20.51% and 38.46% significantly less calculus formation than the Cavity Protection toothpaste group (P < 0.05). Total toothpaste group also show 22.58% significantly less calculus formation than the Abhaibhubejhr toothpaste group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The use of Colgate Total toothpaste over a 12-week period was clinically more effective than either Abhaibhubejhr or Colgate Cavity Protection toothpastes in controlling supragingival calculus formation.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):94-98
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_279_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Spatial analysis of mandibular condyles in patients with temporomandibular
           disorders and normal controls using cone beam computed tomography

    • Authors: Natheer Hashim Al-Rawi, Asmaa Tahseen Uthman, Sahar M Sodeify
      Pages: 99 - 105
      Abstract: Natheer Hashim Al-Rawi, Asmaa Tahseen Uthman, Sahar M Sodeify
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):99-105
      Objectives: The aim of the study is to investigate the condylar position and its relation to articular eminence and axial condylar angle in temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) patients and in normal controls using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: CBCT temporomandibular joint (TMJ) images of 70 participants (38 males and 32 females, mean age 26.4 years) were analyzed. They were divided into control group (including 35 subjects) and study group (including 35 subjects). Linear measurements of joint space and condyle determined the condylar position of each TMJ. Articular eminence height and inclination were also measured with axial condylar angle to determine its relation to condylar position. Independent and paired sample t-test was applied to compare between the groups and TMJ sides of the same group at significance level of 0.05. Results: Statistical significant differences were found between males and females of both groups regarding superior joint space (SJS), lateral joint space, A-P, and M-L condyle distance (P < 0.05). SJS, medial joint space (MJS), and eminence angle were greater (P < 0.01) in male's joints with TMD with flatter axial condylar angle (P < 0.05), when compared with normal TMJ counterpart. Females TMJs showed significantly higher values of MJS of affected side when compared with normal counterpart with flatter axial condylar angle (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Superior and MJS parameters were the ones that showed significant differences between affected and nonaffected joints. The mean axial condylar angle was smaller in joints with abnormal TMJ. This indicates that the condyles of the affected joints may rotate inward.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):99-105
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_202_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Knowledge, attitude, and practice of pediatricians regarding pediatric
           liquid medicaments

    • Authors: KL Girish Babu, Geeta Maruti Doddamani, LR Kumaraswamy Naik
      Pages: 106 - 110
      Abstract: KL Girish Babu, Geeta Maruti Doddamani, LR Kumaraswamy Naik
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):106-110
      Objective: To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of pediatricians regarding pediatric liquid medicaments (PLMs) and its effect on dental health. Materials and Methods: A convenience sample of 103 pediatricians was asked to answer a questionnaire. Results: A total number of 87 pediatricians completed the questionnaires. They considered age and body weight of the child (58%), cost of the medicine (40%), and pharmaceutical company (37%) to be relevant while prescribing. Eighty-eight percent of pediatricians knew that the PLM was sweet in nature. Sixty-seven percent of pediatricians stated that pH of PLM is responsible for deleterious effect on teeth. Seventy-two percent of pediatricians were aware of hidden sugars present in PLM. Only 48% of pediatricians were aware of availability of sugar-free medicine. Seventy percent of pediatricians were of the opinion that sugar-free medicine is not as sweet as sugar-containing medicines and is more expensive (65%). Conclusion: Knowledge, attitude, and practice of pediatricians regarding PLMs and its effect on dental health were not satisfactory.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):106-110
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_222_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial efficacy of an alternative natural
           agent for disinfection of toothbrushes

    • Authors: R Vignesh, C Vishnu Rekha, Parisa Norouzi Baghkomeh, Sankar Annamalai, Ditto Sharmin
      Pages: 111 - 116
      Abstract: R Vignesh, C Vishnu Rekha, Parisa Norouzi Baghkomeh, Sankar Annamalai, Ditto Sharmin
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):111-116
      Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial potency of aqueous extract of Psidium guajava leaves in two different concentrations as a toothbrush disinfectant against three oral bacterial species. Materials and Methods: Aqueous extracts of P. guajava leaves were prepared at 20% and 30% concentrations and 0.2% chlorhexidine was used as control. The toothbrushes were equally divided into 9 groups with 10 toothbrushes per disinfectant, which were contaminated with Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Microbial culture was done after 5 min and 3 h of decontamination. Results: Group Ia and Ib showed that the presence of E. faecalis was observed in 8 (40%) of 20 toothbrushes. Group IIa and IIb showed a significant reduction in colony forming unit/toothbrush during 3 h evaluation. Group IIIa and IIIb showed nil growth during 3 h evaluation. Nil growth was observed with the control group for all three organisms. Statistically significant values were obtained for 5 min (P < 0.001) and 3 h (P < 0.001) disinfection period against L. acidophilus at two different concentrations. Conclusion: Aqueous extracts of guava leaves can be used as an alternative organic product for disinfection of toothbrushes.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):111-116
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_196_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Frequency of impacted teeth and categorization of impacted canines: A
           retrospective radiographic study using orthopantomograms

    • Authors: Hassan Al-Zoubi, Abdulgader Abdullatif Alharbi, Donald J Ferguson, Muhammad Sohail Zafar
      Pages: 117 - 121
      Abstract: Hassan Al-Zoubi, Abdulgader Abdullatif Alharbi, Donald J Ferguson, Muhammad Sohail Zafar
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):117-121
      Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the frequency of impacted maxillary canines using seven subtype classification system. For this purpose, impacted maxillary canines have been divided into seven various subtypes. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional, and retrospective study conducted using radiographic data of residents of Madinah, Al Munawwarah. Radiographic data of 14,000 patients, who attended College of Dentistry, Taibah University, from January 2011 to February 2015, were screened against the selection criteria for the presence of impacted teeth. The individuals with maxillary impacted canines were matched to maxillary canine impaction. The occurrence of each subtype of impacted canines was calculated. Results: Impacted teeth are more common in the maxilla compared to mandible. The impacted canine represented the highest proportion of all impacted maxillary teeth followed by the second premolars and the central incisors. According to the classification system represented, Type II of canine impaction comprised the highest proportion (51%) while Type IV (0.5%) comprised the lowest frequency. The maxillary canine is the most frequently impacted tooth followed by mandibular canines. Conclusions: Although there are many variations, the majority of impacted canines fall into Type II of the classification of impacted canines.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):117-121
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_308_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Differentiating spontaneous vertical root fracture in endodontically
           treated tooth

    • Authors: Myung-Jin Lim, Jung-Ae Kim, Yoorina Choi, Chan-Ui Hong, Kyung-San Min
      Pages: 122 - 125
      Abstract: Myung-Jin Lim, Jung-Ae Kim, Yoorina Choi, Chan-Ui Hong, Kyung-San Min
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):122-125
      Although vertical root fracture (VRF) is mostly found in endodontically treated teeth, it also occurs spontaneously. If VRF is recognized after endodontic treatment, it is considered to be iatrogenic and can lead to legal trouble. However, legal problems can be averted if the dentist can prove that the VRF existed before endodontic treatment. This case report describes an unusual, spontaneous VRF in an endodontically treated tooth and presents a useful tip for determining whether a fracture is iatrogenic. We performed nonsurgical endodontic treatment on a mandibular first molar with irreversible pulpitis. After 6 months, the patient revisited with localized swelling, and we diagnosed VRF of the mesial root. We extracted the tooth and prepared it for microscopic examination. We found gutta-percha in the fracture line of the transversely sectioned root, and it appeared to have penetrated to the fracture line through the force generated from the filling. The patient was informed and agreed that the fracture occurred spontaneously before treatment. This case demonstrates the time point of VRF occurrence by identifying the presence of gutta-percha in the fracture line. We suggest that this procedure can be used to demonstrate whether VRFs in endodontically treated teeth are spontaneous or iatrogenic.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):122-125
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_160_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Shifts of subgingival bacterial population after nonsurgical and
           pharmacological therapy of localized aggressive periodontitis, followed
           for 1 year by Ion Torrent PGM platform

    • Authors: Giuseppina Campisciano, Annamaria Toschetti, Manola Comar, Rosanna Di Taranto, Federico Berton, Claudio Stacchi
      Pages: 126 - 129
      Abstract: Giuseppina Campisciano, Annamaria Toschetti, Manola Comar, Rosanna Di Taranto, Federico Berton, Claudio Stacchi
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):126-129
      The possibility of targeting the hypervariable region V3 of the 16S rRNA gene using Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) could provide a complete analysis of subgingival plaque samples, potentially able to identify microbiological species missed by culture-based methods. A 16-year-old female smoker patient, affected by localized aggressive periodontitis, underwent a full-mouth disinfection protocol and was inserted in a 3-month recall program. Microbiological samples were collected at baseline and at 30, 100, 365 days follow-up and analyzed by Ion Torrent PGM. Capnocytophaga, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, and Treponema were the most represented pathogens at baseline. Nonsurgical treatment and systemic antibiotics drastically lowered the anaerobic species, and their presence remained limited after 100 days, while a consistent recolonization by anaerobic bacteria was detected at 365 days. The patient showed a general improvement of periodontal conditions. Differently from polymerase chain reaction and other microarray techniques, Ion Torrent performs a quantitative analysis of the microbiota, irrespective of the searched species. An accurate definition of the shifts of the bacterial community might help periodontal researchers for a better understanding of the impact of different treatment approaches or in intercepting nonresponsive conditions.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):126-129
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_309_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A comparative assessment of prosthetic outcome on enucleation and
           evisceration in three different etiological eye defects: A case series

    • Authors: Nafij Bin Jamayet, John Kariuki Kirangi, Adam Husein, Mohammad Khursheed Alam
      Pages: 130 - 134
      Abstract: Nafij Bin Jamayet, John Kariuki Kirangi, Adam Husein, Mohammad Khursheed Alam
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):130-134
      Enucleation and evisceration are the most common surgical procedures that are performed to manage tumor, trauma, and infection. Given the consequences of surgical intervention, the conditions of the remaining eye socket may affect future prosthetic rehabilitation. A custom-made ocular prosthesis can be used to help restore the esthetics and functional defects and to improve the quality of life of patients with such conditions. An assessment must be performed on the prosthetic outcome before rehabilitation. The etiology of defect, type of surgery, condition of the remaining socket, and patient's age should all be considered. This report discusses three different etiological eye defects that have undergone enucleation and evisceration and describes the factors that have a significant role in the esthetic and functional outcome of the prosthesis. This report should serve as a helpful aid for maxillofacial prosthodontists to understand the primary objective of rehabilitating each eye defect and to meet patient expectations.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):130-134
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1305-7456.202636
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Complications in implant dentistry

    • Authors: Ayesha Hanif, Saima Qureshi, Zeeshan Sheikh, Haroon Rashid
      Pages: 135 - 140
      Abstract: Ayesha Hanif, Saima Qureshi, Zeeshan Sheikh, Haroon Rashid
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):135-140
      After tooth loss, an individual may seek tooth replacement so that his/her function and esthetics could be restored. Clinical prosthodontics, during the past decade, has significantly improved and developed according to the advancements in the science and patient's demands and needs. Conventional options in prosthodontics for substituting a missing single tooth include the removable partial denture, partial and full coverage bridgework, and resin-bonded bridgework. Dental implants have gained increasing popularity over the years as they are capable of restoring the function to near normal in both partial and completely edentulous arches. With substantial evidence available, fixed implant-supported prosthesis are fully acknowledged as a reliable treatment option for the replacement of single or multiple missing teeth nowadays. While dental implants are increasingly becoming the choice of replacement for missing teeth, the impediments associated with them are progressively emerging too.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(1):135-140
      PubDate: Tue,21 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_340_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2017)
       
 
 
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