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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover European Journal of Dentistry
  [SJR: 0.496]   [H-I: 11]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1305-7456 - ISSN (Online) 1305-7464
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Retrospective study on sequelae in traumatized permanent teeth

    • Authors: Fernanda Chiguti Yamashita, Isolde Terezinha Santos Previdelli, Nair Narumi Orita Pavan, Marcos Sérgio Endo
      Pages: 275 - 280
      Abstract: Fernanda Chiguti Yamashita, Isolde Terezinha Santos Previdelli, Nair Narumi Orita Pavan, Marcos Sérgio Endo
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):275-280
      Objective: This study aimed to identify possible associations of the presence or absence of posttrauma sequelae with the factors inherent to the traumatized tooth and treatment. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed through the evaluation of records and radiographs of a center of reference for dental trauma between January 2008 and December 2014. The factors were analyzed and associated with posttrauma sequelae, such as pulp necrosis and root resorption. Statistical Analysis Used: A binomial logistic regression model was fit (P < 0.05). Results: In luxations, it was possible to observe 37% pulp necrosis, 16% inflammatory root resorption, and 8% replacement resorption. The binomial logistic regression revealed that male gender (P = 0.0392, odds ratio [OR] = 2.79), avulsion injury (P = 0.0009, OR = 12.27), and elapsed time >16 days between the time of trauma to the beginning of the endodontic treatment (P = 0.0450, OR = 7.53) showed a greater chance of presenting a posttrauma complication. Conclusions: Gender, type of injury, stage of root development, and time after trauma until the beginning of the endodontic intervention were related to the appearance of sequelae.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):275-280
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_85_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Using erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser irradiation in different
           energy output levels versus ultrasonic in removal of root canal filling
           materials in endodontic retreatment

    • Authors: Mehmet Omer Gorduysus, Hanin Al-Rubai, Basheer Salman, Deena Al Saady, Hiba Al-Dagistani, Sevda Muftuoglu
      Pages: 281 - 286
      Abstract: Mehmet Omer Gorduysus, Hanin Al-Rubai, Basheer Salman, Deena Al Saady, Hiba Al-Dagistani, Sevda Muftuoglu
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):281-286
      Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation in different energy outputs versus ultrasonic in gutta-percha removal during the endodontic retreatment. Materials and Methods: A total of 21 extracted human lower premolars were divided into three groups (n = 7). Following the standardized preparation of the root canals with Wave One Rotary system and obturation with gutta-percha: Group I was treated with ultrasonic, Group II by Er:YAG laser with 40 mJ/Pulse, and Group III by Er:YAG laser with 50 mJ/Pulse for the removal of gutta-percha from the canals. Two extra teeth were treated by Er:YAG laser with 135 mJ/Pulse as control group. For all groups, time for gutta-percha removal was recorded. Samples were then splited into two halves and tested by scanning electron microscope and stereomicroscopic evaluation under different magnification power to observe the efficacy of each method used in the removal of gutta-percha. Results: Statistical analysis of Kruskal–Wallis suggested that there are significant difference between the groups in relation to removal time (P < 0.05) and 2 × 2 Mann–Whitney U-test among the groups revealed that there is no significant difference between 40 and 50 mJ laser outputs (P > 0.05), but ultrasonic versus 40 and/or 50 mJ laser outputs were significantly different (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Er:YAG laser beam was not so efficient when compared to ultrasonic to reach the deeper parts of the canals as it was asserted, thermal side effects and burning damages were observed on the root canal dentinal walls. Moreover, the delivery system was not flexible enough to compensate the curvature of the canal system even though we used more straight canals as the sample ones as well as more time-consuming than the ultrasonic and more clinical time, rendering it to be less efficient in the removal of the obturation material during endodontic retreatment procedures.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):281-286
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_111_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Effectiveness of two interactive educational methods to teach tobacco
           cessation counseling for senior dental students

    • Authors: Mina Ahmadian, Mohammad Reza Khami, Arezoo Ebn Ahamdi, Samaneh Razeghi, Reza Yazdani
      Pages: 287 - 292
      Abstract: Mina Ahmadian, Mohammad Reza Khami, Arezoo Ebn Ahamdi, Samaneh Razeghi, Reza Yazdani
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):287-292
      Objective: Nowadays, one of the major health problems in many countries is tobacco use. Dental professionals are in a unique position to promote smoking cessation since they have the opportunity for regular interaction with their patients. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of two educational methods to teach tobacco cessation counseling (TCC) in dental practice for senior dental students. Materials and Methods: In this interventional study, 93 eligible senior dental students from two dental schools in Tehran, Iran were randomly divided into two groups. Two educational programs, role play (RP) and problem-based learning (PBL), with the same aim about TCC in dental practice, were developed and implemented for the two groups. The score of knowledge, attitude, and skill were determined in both groups before and after participation in the course using a questionnaire. The changes in the scores from pre- to post-test were statistically analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA test. Results: Total scores of knowledge, attitude, and skill of the participants showed improvements when compared to scores before training (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, and P < 0.001, respectively). However, the differences between the two study methods were statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The results suggested that TCC training through RP and PBL methods leads to improvement in knowledge, attitude, and skills of dental students in the short-term evaluation.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):287-292
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_352_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Assessment of anxiety, depression, and serum cortisol level in oral
           submucous fibrosis patients:A controlled clinical trial

    • Authors: Shubhra Kanodia, Vishal Prakash Giri, Om Prakash Giri, M Parvathi Devi, Y Garima
      Pages: 293 - 298
      Abstract: Shubhra Kanodia, Vishal Prakash Giri, Om Prakash Giri, M Parvathi Devi, Y Garima
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):293-298
      Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the anxiety, depression, and serum cortisol level in OSMF patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Outpatient Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Teerthanker Mahaveer Dental College and Research Centre, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India. Age- and gender-matched 105 patients were divided into three equal groups as follows: Group 1 – those with areca nut chewing habits and OSMF, Group 2 – those with areca nut chewing habits but no OSMF, and Group 3– those without areca nut chewing habits and without OSMF. Anxiety and depression were assessed by the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, respectively. Serum cortisol level was also measured simultaneously. Statistical Analysis: Paired t-test, Chi-square test, and analysis of variance were used. Results: Fifty (47.62%) patients were observed to be in the age group of 25–32 years. Ninety-six (91.4%) patients were males and 9 (8.6%) were females. The mean serum cortisol level was observed to be higher among patients with OSMF-C followed by those with OSMF-D. Conclusion: We conclude that there is a significant association between OSMF, depression, and serum cortisol level.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):293-298
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_9_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Role of herpesviruses in chronic periodontitis and their association with
           clinical parameters and in increasing severity of the disease

    • Authors: Mohammad Mukhit Abdul Gaffar Kazi, Renu Bharadwaj
      Pages: 299 - 304
      Abstract: Mohammad Mukhit Abdul Gaffar Kazi, Renu Bharadwaj
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):299-304
      Objective: This study aims to assess the role of herpesviruses in chronic periodontitis and their association with clinical parameters and in increasing severity. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective case–control study. Ethical approval and prior consent were taken. A subgingival plaque sample was collected from a total of 300 patients and 300 controls and processed for DNA extraction and multiplex polymerase chain reaction for detection of herpesviruses. Results: The most predominant age group affected was 41–50 followed by 31–40 years and male patients outnumbered the female patients. Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 (46.6%) was the most common Herpesvirus followed by HSV-2 (34.6%), Epstein–Barr viruses (EBV) (30.6%), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) (19.3%) in chronic periodontitis. Herpesviruses were significantly associated with increasing severity of the disease and had shown differences in their association with clinical parameters. Multiple herpesvirus infection was seen in patients with severe chronic periodontitis. The most common combination was HSV-1 + HSV-2 and HSV-1 + HSV-2 + EBV. Conclusions: HSV-1 was the most common herpesviruses implicated in the etiology of the chronic periodontitis followed by HSV-2, EBV and CMV. A herpesvirus differs in association with clinical parameters and plays an important role in increasing severity of the disease.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):299-304
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_43_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Determination of Tweed&#39;s cephalometric norms in Bengali
           population

    • Authors: Lalima Kumari, Anuranjan Das
      Pages: 305 - 310
      Abstract: Lalima Kumari, Anuranjan Das
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):305-310
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to establish Tweed's cephalometric norms for Indian Bengali population and to compare it with Caucasian norms. Materials and Methods: The participants were of 50 adults with normal occlusion and pleasant profile. Lateral cephalograms were taken in natural head position, and cephalometric norms were established using Tweeds diagnostic triangle. Results: The study showed more proclined lower incisors in comparison with Caucasians. The result of the study also indicated that separate norms should be considered for Bengali males and females during diagnosis and treatment planning as mean Frankfort mandibular angle value for females was found to be significantly higher than that of males (t48= 2.97; P < 0.01) and the mean value of incisor mandibular plane angle for males was significantly higher than that of females. Conclusion: The findings emphasize the need for group-specific norms for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning and provide cephalometric standards for normal Bengali adults.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):305-310
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_274_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using
           cone-beam computed tomography intensity values

    • Authors: Mustafa Alkhader, Malik Hudieb, Yousef Khader
      Pages: 311 - 316
      Abstract: Mustafa Alkhader, Malik Hudieb, Yousef Khader
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):311-316
      Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) intensity values. Materials and Methods: CBCT cross-sectional images for 436 posterior mandibular implant sites were selected for the study. Using Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, California, USA), two observers classified the bone density into three categories: low, intermediate, and high, and CBCT intensity values were generated. Results: Based on the consensus of the two observers, 15.6% of sites were of low bone density, 47.9% were of intermediate density, and 36.5% were of high density. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that CBCT intensity values had a high predictive power for predicting high density sites (area under the curve [AUC] =0.94, P < 0.005) and intermediate density sites (AUC = 0.81, P < 0.005). The best cut-off value for intensity to predict intermediate density sites was 218 (sensitivity = 0.77 and specificity = 0.76) and the best cut-off value for intensity to predict high density sites was 403 (sensitivity = 0.93 and specificity = 0.77). Conclusions: CBCT intensity values are considered useful for predicting bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):311-316
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_14_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of crestal bone resorption around cylindrical and conical
           implants following 6 months of loading: A randomized clinical trial

    • Authors: Naser Sargolzaie, Hamid Reza Arab, Marzieh Mohammadi Moghaddam
      Pages: 317 - 322
      Abstract: Naser Sargolzaie, Hamid Reza Arab, Marzieh Mohammadi Moghaddam
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):317-322
      Objective: The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of implant body form (cylindrical and conical implants) on crestal bone levels during 6 months' follow-up after loading. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 SPI implants (19 conical implants/13 cylindrical implants) were randomly placed in 12 male patients using a submerged approach. None of the patients had compromising medical conditions or parafunctional habits. Periapical radiographs using the parallel technique were taken after clinical loading and 6 months later. Clinical indices including pocket depth and bleeding on probing (BOP) were recorded on 6-month follow-up. Data were analyzed by independent samples t-test and Chi-square test with a significance level of 0.05. Results: Six months after loading, crestal bone loss was 0.84 (±0.29) mm around the cylindrical implants and 0.73 (±0.62) mm around the conical types, which was not significantly different (P = 0.54). Pocket depth around the cylindrical and conical implants was 2.61 (±0.45) mm and 2.36 (±0.44) mm, respectively (P = 0.13). BOP was observed among 53.8% and 47.4% of the cylindrical implants and conical (P = 0.13). Bone loss and pocket depth in the maxilla and mandible had no significant difference (P = 0.46 and P = 0.09, respectively). Conclusion: In this study, although bone loss and clinical parameters were slightly higher in the cylindrical implants, there was no significant difference between the conical- and cylindrical-shaped implants.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):317-322
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_38_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of the Pendulum appliance and the Jones Jig: A prospective
           comparative study

    • Authors: Sushruth Shetty, Rajkumar Maurya, H V Pruthvi Raj, Anand Patil
      Pages: 323 - 329
      Abstract: Sushruth Shetty, Rajkumar Maurya, H V Pruthvi Raj, Anand Patil
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):323-329
      Objective: To compare two molar distalization devices, the Pendulum appliance (PA) and the Jones Jig (JJ) in dental Class II patients. Materials and Methods: Pretreatment and postdistalization lateral cephalograms and study models of 20 subjects (6 males, 14 females) Class II malocclusion subjects were examined. PA and JJ group both consisted of 10 patients each with a mean pretreatment age of 12 years 1 month for females and 12 years 5 months for males. The PA and the JJ appliance were activated once in a month until Class II molar relationship was corrected to a super Class I molar relationship in both groups. Initial and final measurements and treatment changes were compared by means of Paired t-test. Results: Maxillary first molar distalized an average of 3.85 mm in the PA and 2.75 mm in the JJ between T1 and T2; rate of molar distalization was 1.59 mm/month for PA, and the JJ appliance averaged 0.88 mm/month, distal molar tipping was greater in PA (6.2°) than in the JJ (3.9°). Average mesial movement of the premolars was 2.2 mm with PA and JJ both. JJ showed a greater rotation of first molars after distalization as compared to PA. The increase in vertical facial height was also greater for JJ as compared to PA. Conclusions: Both the appliances were effective in molar distalization with PA requiring less distalization time (16 days less than JJ). Some adverse effects were noted with both which one should strive to control.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):323-329
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_295_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Color stability and marginal integrity of interim crowns: An in vitro
           study

    • Authors: Marwa I Elagra, Mohammad R Rayyan, Maisam M Alhomaidhi, Areej A Alanaziy, Mona O Alnefaie
      Pages: 330 - 334
      Abstract: Marwa I Elagra, Mohammad R Rayyan, Maisam M Alhomaidhi, Areej A Alanaziy, Mona O Alnefaie
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):330-334
      Objective: Many commercial dental materials are used to fabricate interim restorations. This study aimed to compare the color stability and the marginal integrity of four different interim crown materials. Materials and Methods: An ivorine right maxillary central incisor was prepared for a full coverage all-ceramic restoration. A total of 36 specimens in the form of crowns were fabricated on the master die using four different materials (n = 9); Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin (TrimPLUS), PMMA computer-aided design, and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) blocks (Ceramill TEMP), cold cure bis-acryl resin (Success CD), and bis-acryl resin dual-cure composite (TempSpan). Color change ΔE for each sample was calculated by measuring its color as Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L* a* b* with a spectrophotometer before and after immersing in a concentrated tea solution for 7 days. Marginal gap was measured at four reference points using stereomicroscope at ×40. One-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple comparisons test were used to determine any statistically significant difference between the four groups, (α = 0.05). Results: Success CD showed significantly the greatest color change (7.7) among all the tested materials, while no significant difference was found between the other three materials. TempSpan showed significantly the highest marginal gap formation (430.15 μm), while no significant difference was found between the three other materials. Conclusions: Bis-acryl resin composite materials demonstrated clinically noticeable change in color while PMMA materials demonstrated superior color stability. Dual cure interim materials exhibited significantly higher marginal discrepancy in comparison to PMMA and cold cure bis-acrylic resin materials. CAD-CAM PMMA material exhibited the best color stability and marginal integrity.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):330-334
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_66_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Tooth extraction: Pattern and etiology from extreme Northwestern Nigeria

    • Authors: Abdurrazaq Olanrewaju Taiwo, Adebayo Aremu Ibikunle, Ramat Oyebunmi Braimah, Omotayo Amidu Sulaiman, Olalekan Micah Gbotolorun
      Pages: 335 - 339
      Abstract: Abdurrazaq Olanrewaju Taiwo, Adebayo Aremu Ibikunle, Ramat Oyebunmi Braimah, Omotayo Amidu Sulaiman, Olalekan Micah Gbotolorun
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):335-339
      Objective: Tooth extraction is a commonly performed procedure in dental clinics. It has been shown that the reasons for and pattern of tooth extraction vary across geographical regions. Few reports on the pattern of extraction among a semi-urban populace exist. To the best of our knowledge, there is no study on the pattern and reasons for tooth mortality from Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria, which is a semi-urban region. Materials and Methods: A review of the records of patients that had tooth extraction at our center between January 2009 and January 2016, was done. Data such as the age, gender, type of tooth extracted, and reasons for extraction were retrieved and analyzed. Cross tabulations for age and gender were also made. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: A total of 1167 extractions were performed in 984 patients. An age range of 18–107 years with a mean (±standard deviation) of 34.8 (13.3) was observed. Most of the patients were in the 21–30 years age group accounting for 35.7% of cases. Dental caries and its sequelae (DCS) (631, 54.1%) were the most common reasons for extraction, followed by periodontal disease (192, 16.5%). The difference in proportions of reasons for tooth extraction between the gender was statistically significant (P = 0.02; df = 24). The difference in the reasons for extraction among the age groups was statistically significant (P < 0.001; df = 132). Conclusion: DCS along with periodontal disease were the major reasons for extractions. These are largely preventable causes of tooth extraction; therefore, there is a need for commencement of far-reaching preventative actions.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):335-339
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_160_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Peri-implantitis and extracellular matrix antibodies: A
           case&#8211;control study

    • Authors: Piero Papi, Stefano Di Carlo, Daniele Rosella, Francesca De Angelis, Mario Capogreco, Giorgio Pompa
      Pages: 340 - 344
      Abstract: Piero Papi, Stefano Di Carlo, Daniele Rosella, Francesca De Angelis, Mario Capogreco, Giorgio Pompa
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):340-344
      Objective: The aim of this case–control study was to compare patients with a healthy peri-implant environment and patients affected by peri-implantitis, evaluating the occurrence of antibodies to extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. The authors hypothesized the presence of ECM autoantibodies in serum of peri-implantitis patients. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided into two groups: one with dental implants with a diagnosis of peri-implantitis and one control group with implants classified as being “healthy.” Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed on patients' sera to detect human antibodies to type I, III, IV, and V collagens, laminin, and fibronectin. Fisher exact test was performed to evaluate statistical association, with a significant P < 0.05. Results: Forty-two patients were enrolled in this study, 27 females (64.28%) and 15 males (35.72%) with a mean age of 53 ± 29.69 years (age range 32–74). The presence of antibodies to CIII was recorded in 6/21 (28.57%) patients of test group, compared to just 2/21 (9.52%) for the control group, showing a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). Other antibodies tested were found to be not statistically significant or absent. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that further studies, with larger sample and different design, are necessary to address the research purpose, evaluating possible associations between anti-ECM antibodies and peri-implantitis.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):340-344
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_28_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of using different bridge prosthetic designs for partial defect
           restoration through mathematical modeling

    • Authors: Oksana Styranivska, Nataliia Kliuchkovska, Nataliya Mykyyevych
      Pages: 345 - 351
      Abstract: Oksana Styranivska, Nataliia Kliuchkovska, Nataliya Mykyyevych
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):345-351
      Objective: To analyze the stress–strain states of bone and abutment teeth during the use of different prosthetic designs of fixed partial dentures with the use of relevant mathematical modeling principles. Materials and Methods: The use of Comsol Multiphysics 3.5 (Comsol AB, Sweden) software during the mathematical modeling of stress–strain states provided numerical data for analytical interpretation in three different clinical scenarios with fixed dentures and different abutment teeth and demountable prosthetic denture with the saddle-shaped intermediate part. Statistical Analysis Used: Microsoft Excel Software (Microsoft Office 2017) helped to evaluate absolute mistakes of stress and strain parameters of each abutment tooth during three modeled scenarios and normal condition and to summarize data into the forms of tables. Results: In comparison with the fixed prosthetic denture supported by the canine, first premolar, and third molar, stresses at the same abutment teeth with the use of demountable denture with the saddle-shaped intermediate part decreased: at the mesial abutment tooth by 2.8 times, at distal crown by 6.1 times, and at the intermediate part by 11.1 times, respectively, the deformation level decreased by 3.1, 1.9, and 1.4 times at each area. Conclusions: The methods of mathematical modeling proved that complications during the use of fixed partial dentures based on the overload effect of the abutment teeth and caused by the deformation process inside the intermediate section of prosthetic construction.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):345-351
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_72_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The effect of environment (Dry and Natural Saliva) on clasp retention: In
           vitro study - Part I

    • Authors: Bilal Mourshed, Nashwan Mohammed Qaed, Hashem Motahir Al-Shamiri, Nader Alaizari, Saleh Sulaiman Alhamdah, Amal Alfaqih
      Pages: 352 - 356
      Abstract: Bilal Mourshed, Nashwan Mohammed Qaed, Hashem Motahir Al-Shamiri, Nader Alaizari, Saleh Sulaiman Alhamdah, Amal Alfaqih
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):352-356
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of environments (dry and wet) to dislodge the clasp. Materials and Methods: Mandibular test models with natural premolar and molar teeth were used to test four types of clasp (each 12) (Akers, rest plate Akers [RPA], half and half [H-H], and ring clasp) in dry and natural fresh saliva environments. Each clasp was pulled out 10 times with a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min and the force required to withdraw each was measured. Statistical Analysis Used: A paired sample t-test and Wilcoxon test were used. Results: There were significant differences between the dry and wet (natural fresh saliva) environment. However, while the mean of the environment for RPA and ring clasp type was significantly different, the H-H and Akers clasp type was not. Conclusion: The environment has an effect on dislodging the clasp but differs according to the type of clasp.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):352-356
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_158_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Assessment of the oral health status of asthmatic children

    • Authors: Abla Arafa, Salwa Aldahlawi, Adel Fathi
      Pages: 357 - 363
      Abstract: Abla Arafa, Salwa Aldahlawi, Adel Fathi
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):357-363
      Objectives: To assess the oral health status and salivary composition in a group of children suffering from bronchial asthma. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of sixty asthmatic children, sixty healthy negative controls, and sixty healthy positive controls of both sexes with age ranging from 4 to 12 years old. The asthmatics were grouped according to disease severity into mild, moderate, or severe asthmatic. All the children were clinically examined to assess their dental caries experience (decayed, indicated for extraction, and filled primary tooth [def] and decayed-missing-filled permanent tooth [DMF]), dental erosion condition (tooth wear index), and gingival health condition (gingival index [GI]). Salivary samples were collected and assessed for salivary flow rate, salivary pH, and the level of calcium, sodium, and potassium. Results: The results of this study revealed that asthmatic children presented significantly higher def, DMF score, and GI mean values compared to the control groups. Severe asthmatics significantly presented the highest def and GI score. Salivary analysis revealed reduced stimulated salivary flow rate and altered salivary pH. In addition, significantly elevated mean salivary calcium level found to be associated with higher GI mean score. Conclusions: Children suffering from bronchial asthma should receive special dental preventive attention as presented with greater risk for oral and dental diseases as compared to the healthy controls.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):357-363
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_65_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Correlation of environmental tobacco smoke to gingival pigmentation and
           salivary alpha amylase in young adults

    • Authors: Deepa Ponnaiyan, Priyanka Chillara, Yuvasri Palani
      Pages: 364 - 369
      Abstract: Deepa Ponnaiyan, Priyanka Chillara, Yuvasri Palani
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):364-369
      Objective: Passive smoking leads to melanin pigmentation on gingiva. However, documentation of gingival pigmentation and salivary amylase activity in passive smokers relative to the duration of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), is incomplete and requires further investigation. Thus, this study aimed to assess effects of ETS exposure on gingival pigmentation in young adults. In addition, to correlate a number of years of exposure to an extent, the intensity of gingival pigmentation and salivary amylase activity. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 nonsmokers aged 18–35 years with a positive history of ETS exposure were recruited for the study. Duration and source of ETS were assessed using a questionnaire. Gingival pigmentation was assessed using gingival pigmentation index for the extent and Dummett oral pigmentation index for intensity. The skin color of all patients was also assessed. Pearson Chi-square test and one-way ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the data. Results: Number of years of exposure to passive smoking was highly significant to the extent and intensity of gingival pigmentation (P < 0.001). ETS from home environment was highly significant to the intensity of pigmentation. Environmental sources of ETS contributed to pigmentation as the majority of patients reported exposure from vehicles and workplace. The salivary amylase levels were inversely proportional to the duration of exposure to ETS. Conclusion: Within limitations of this cross-sectional observational study, it was concluded that there was a strong correlation between ETS exposure and gingival pigmentation. Duration of exposure was significant to an extent, the intensity of pigmentation and salivary amylase activity.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):364-369
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_99_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Clinical comparison of the stain removal efficacy of two air polishing
           powders

    • Authors: Rosalin Hongsathavij, Yosvimol Kuphasuk, Kanyawat Rattanasuwan
      Pages: 370 - 375
      Abstract: Rosalin Hongsathavij, Yosvimol Kuphasuk, Kanyawat Rattanasuwan
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):370-375
      Objectives: Air polishing with sodium bicarbonate powders with a grain size of 40 μm is recommended for patient comfort. However, the efficacy of small grain size on stain removal has not been adequately studied. This study aimed to compare the stain removal efficacy of sodium bicarbonate powders with grain sizes of 65 and 40 μm and to evaluate patient acceptance and operator opinion after using both air polishing powders. Materials and Methods: A double-blind, randomized, split-mouth study was conducted with 35 participants with moderate to heavy dental staining on both sides of the upper teeth. Removal of dental stains on the index teeth was performed using sodium bicarbonate powders with a grain size of either 65 or 40 μm. The time taken to completely remove all dental stains was recorded. After treatment, a questionnaire was used to evaluate patient acceptance and the operator's opinion. Results: The average time for the removal of all stains by powder was 4.5 ± 3.6 min with a grain size of 65 μm and 4.4 ± 3.8 min with a grain size of 40 μm. The difference in the average time between the two groups was not significant (P = 0.461). The operator's opinions of the two powders were identical, and patient acceptance did not differ significantly between the two types of powders. Conclusions: The 40 μm sodium bicarbonate powder removed dental stains as efficiently as the 65-μm powder. Powder handling and patient acceptance were comparable between grain sizes of 65 and 40 μm.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):370-375
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_152_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of quality of obturation and instrumentation time using hand
           files and two rotary file systems in primary molars: A single-blinded
           randomized controlled trial

    • Authors: Lavanya Govindaraju, Ganesh Jeevanandan, E M. G Subramanian
      Pages: 376 - 379
      Abstract: Lavanya Govindaraju, Ganesh Jeevanandan, E M. G Subramanian
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):376-379
      Objective: In permanent dentition, different rotary systems are used for canal cleaning and shaping. Rotary instrumentation in pediatric dentistry is an emerging concept. A very few studies have compared the efficiency of rotary instrumentation for canal preparation in primary teeth. Hence, this study was performed to compare the obturation quality and instrumentation time of two rotary files systems – Protaper, Mtwo with hand files in primary molars. Materials and Methods: Forty-five primary mandibular molars were randomly allotted to one of the three groups. Instrumentation was done using K-files in Group 1; Protaper in Group 2; and Mtwo in Group 3. Instrumentation time was recorded. The canal filling quality was assessed as underfill, optimal fill, and overfill. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square, ANOVA, and post hoc Tukey test. Results: No significant difference was observed in the quality of obturation among three groups. Intergroup comparison of the instrumentation time showed a statistically significant difference between the three groups. Conclusion: The use of rotary instrumentation in primary teeth results in marked reduction in the instrumentation time and improves the quality of obturation.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):376-379
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_345_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Influence of irrigating agents on fiber postpush-out bond strength to
           radicular dentin sections with the different adhesive system

    • Authors: Satheesh B Haralur, Asim Nasser A Alasabi, Sultan A. Abohathrah Al Qahtani, Saeed Musleh S Alqahtani
      Pages: 380 - 384
      Abstract: Satheesh B Haralur, Asim Nasser A Alasabi, Sultan A. Abohathrah Al Qahtani, Saeed Musleh S Alqahtani
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):380-384
      Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of irrigating agents on push-out bond strength of resin postcemented with various adhesive systems at different radicular dentin sections. Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted premolar teeth were root canal treated, subsequently decorated at cementoenamel junction. The endodontic postspace was irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for Group A (n = 30) and Group B (n = 30), respectively. The sample from each group was subdivided into three groups (10) according to luting protocol of etch-wash, self-etch, and self-adhesive. Individual teeth with cemented resin postsamples were sectioned into coronal, middle, and apical segments. Subsequently, subjected for pushout bond strength test by applying a load at 0.5 mm/min speed. The data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and Tukey comparison test at a significant difference level of 0.05. Results: The coronal section with 5.25% NaOCl irrigation and self-etch luting protocol provided the highest push out strength at 16.282 Mpa. The etch-wash luting protocol in both irrigations showed the lesser bond strength at 8.273 and 8.493 MPa, respectively, in coronal section. Conclusions: The self-etch adhesive system showed better push out bond strength and 17% EDTA had a negative influence on self-etch bond strength. The coronal sections had highest bond strength in comparison with apical radicular dentin sections.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):380-384
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_280_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Human salivary protein extraction from RNAPro·SAL™,
           Pure·SAL™, and passive drooling method

    • Authors: Zohaib Khurshid, Syed Faraz Moin, Rabia Sannam Khan, Muhammad Atif Saleem Agwan, Abdullah Hamed Alwadaani, Muhammad Sohail Zafar
      Pages: 385 - 389
      Abstract: Zohaib Khurshid, Syed Faraz Moin, Rabia Sannam Khan, Muhammad Atif Saleem Agwan, Abdullah Hamed Alwadaani, Muhammad Sohail Zafar
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):385-389
      Objective: The aim of the current study was to carry out a preliminary validation of devices for standardized collection of whole mouth fluid (WMF) in comparison to the passive drooling method for protein analysis in healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: A carefully designed sample collection/pretreatment protocol is crucial to the success of any saliva proteomics project. In this study, WMF was collected from healthy volunteers (n = 10, ages: 18–26 years). Individuals with any oral disease were excluded from the study group. In our study, we evaluated the following collection methods; the classical passive drooling method (unstimulated whole saliva) and standardized tools for saliva collection (Pure·SAL™, and RNAPro·SAL™) from Oasis Diagnostics® Corporation (Vancouver WA, USA). For estimation of protein levels, we used the bicinchoninic acid assay and protein assay kit (Thermo Fisher). The two-dimensional gel electrophoresis sample analysis was carried out for the estimation of proteins in one of the samples. Results: When gels were compared, the difference was seen in the resolution of spots. Protein spots were fading from high- to low-molecular weight masses. Hence, advanced devices in comparison to spitting method resulted in much clearer protein spots which in turn prove the validation of devices. Conclusions: In this study, we concluded that protein extraction could be possible by both methods such as passive drooling method and through advanced saliva collection devices (Pure·SAL™ and RNAPro·SAL™).
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):385-389
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_183_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Oral squamous cell carcinoma masquerading as gingival overgrowth

    • Authors: Roshni Ramesh, Arun Sadasivan
      Pages: 390 - 394
      Abstract: Roshni Ramesh, Arun Sadasivan
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):390-394
      Gingival enlargements are frequently encountered in dental practice. There are different types of gingival enlargements and they vary according to the etiologic factors and pathologic processes that produce them. The exact diagnosis of the enlargement is important as some gingival enlargements can cause extensive morbidity or even mortality. Oral cancers especially squamous cell carcinomas present with variations in clinical presentation and the sites affected. A detailed medical history, clinical examination and radiographic evaluation will help identify the lesion. A biopsy will help provide a definitive diagnosis. An early diagnosis and treatment of squamous cell carcinomas is important as these tumours have a propensity for invasion of adjacent tissues and distant lymphatic metastasis which leads to a worsened prognosis. In this case report, the diagnosis and management of squamous cell carcinoma masquerading as a gingival overgrowth in the mandibular anterior region in a renal patient is reported. Dentists need to be aware and alert of the possibility of squamous cell carcinoma presenting on sites such as gingiva thereby preventing extensive morbidity and even mortality in these patients.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):390-394
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_261_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Malpositioned canine treatment with autotransplantation and laser

    • Authors: Serap Keskin Tunc, Mehmet Savas Kayasan, Esma Ozeroglu, Cennet Neslihan Eroglu
      Pages: 395 - 397
      Abstract: Serap Keskin Tunc, Mehmet Savas Kayasan, Esma Ozeroglu, Cennet Neslihan Eroglu
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):395-397
      Children and young adults often have tooth loss due to congenital tooth deficiency, trauma, or caries. Autotransplantation has many benefits. The transplanted tooth can be moved orthodontically, maintains alveolar bone growth potential during eruption, and functional periodontal ligament function also permits tooth eruption, allows the defected areas to be filled with the bones; gingival contour is much more successful than the one obtained with prosthesis. In this paper, treatment steps and follow-up results of autotransplantation case supported with biostimulation are mentioned. A 14-year-old female patient was admitted to the clinic with a complaint of decayed tooth 53 and malposed tooth 13. Mobile primary tooth was pulled out, and the socket was shaped with surgical drills. By performing transplantation of ectopic canine, splint was applied with steel wire and composite. Diode laser was used to provide deep disinfection of canals. The patient underwent low-dose laser therapy for biostimulation immediately after these procedures. We did not encounter any ankylosis, root resorption, periodontal, or functional problems in our evaluation with computed tomography after 3 years follow-up of the patient.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):395-397
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_355_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Participation of endotoxin in root canal infections: A systematic review
           and meta-analysis

    • Authors: Frederico Canato Martinho, Diego Guilherme Dias de Rabello, Luciana Louzada Ferreira, Gustavo Giacomelli Nascimento
      Pages: 398 - 406
      Abstract: Frederico Canato Martinho, Diego Guilherme Dias de Rabello, Luciana Louzada Ferreira, Gustavo Giacomelli Nascimento
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):398-406
      This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the relationship between endotoxin levels and presence of clinical signs/symptoms and radiographic features in patients with endodontic infection. Electronic searches were performed on Medline/PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scielo, Science Direct, Web of Knowledge and Scopus databases for identification of relevant studies published up to December 2016. Grey literature was searched in Google Scholar. The selected literature was reviewed independently by two authors. Clinical studies evaluating the levels of endotoxin and the presence of clinical and radiographic features were included in this review. In order to determine the relationship between endotoxin levels and presence of clinical signs/symptoms and radiographic features meta-analyses were performed. Among the 385 articles identified in the initial search, 30 were included for full-text appraisal and only eight studies met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Meta-analysis revealed that individuals having teeth with tenderness to percussion (TTP) (P = 0.04; I2 57%) and previous episode of pain (PEP) (P = 0.001; I2 81%) had higher levels of endotoxin than their counterparts. Size of radiographic lesion >2 mm (P = 0.02; I2 68%) and presence of root canal exudation (EX) (P = 0.0007; I2 0%) were associated with higher levels of endotoxin. This systematic review and meta-analyses provided a strong evidence that endotoxin are related with the presence of clinical signs/symptoms and radiographic features in patients with endodontic infection.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):398-406
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_84_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Possible interaction between visfatin, periodontal infection, and other
           systemic diseases: A brief review of literature

    • Authors: Mojtaba Bayani, Mohammad Pourali, Mohammad Keivan
      Pages: 407 - 410
      Abstract: Mojtaba Bayani, Mohammad Pourali, Mohammad Keivan
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):407-410
      Gingivitis and periodontitis are common bacterial infections caused by a variety of microorganisms. Despite the microorganisms' roles as etiologic agents, inflammation-induced substances also have crucial parts in the loss of connective tissue and the supporting alveolar bone. Visfatin is a pleiotropic mediator, which acts as growth factor, cytokine, and pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor. A positive correlation was detected between the serum/plasma levels of visfatin and inflammatory disorders such as diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In addition, the visfatin level was higher in saliva and the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of subjects with periodontal disease. This review defined current, predictable patterns of possible interaction of visfatin with periodontal infection and other systemic diseases, using PubMed and Medline databases searching for articles written in English. Peer-reviewed articles were targeted using the following keywords: “visfatin,” “periodontal disease,” “inflammatory mediator,” and “biomarker.” Available full-text articles were read, and related articles were also scrutinized, while a hand search was also performed. Search was confined to human studies, and articles written in English and published between 1985 and 2016 were selected. It was concluded that periodontal infection and other systemic diseases could be related to the levels of visfatin in GCF, saliva, and serum as a biomarker of these diseases.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):407-410
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_284_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • How to develop and validate a questionnaire for orthodontic research

    • Authors: Elbe Peter, RM Baiju, NO Varghese, Remadevi Sivaraman, David L Streiner
      Pages: 411 - 416
      Abstract: Elbe Peter, RM Baiju, NO Varghese, Remadevi Sivaraman, David L Streiner
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):411-416
      The use of psychometric tools to assess various psychological aspects of malocclusion and treatment is increasing in orthodontics. Mere evaluation of an orthodontic patient with normative criteria is not enough; instead, the psychological status should be assessed using a questionnaire. Many generic and few condition-specific tools are available for assessing quality of life (QoL) in orthodontics. The steps involved in the development of such tools are complex and unknown to many. This article outlines the methodology involved in the development and validation of a psychometric tool for dental and orthodontic use. It also helps the clinician to translate and cross-culturally adapt an existing QoL tool to a different setting.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(3):411-416
      PubDate: Fri,18 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_322_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2017)
       
 
 
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