for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 354 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover European Journal of Dentistry
  [SJR: 0.496]   [H-I: 11]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1305-7456 - ISSN (Online) 1305-7464
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [354 journals]
  • Evaluation of intracanal acetazolamide in late reimplanted rat teeth

    • Authors: Camila Paiva Perin, Vula Papalexiou, Aline Cristina Batista Rodrigues Johann, Natanael Henrique Ribeiro Mattos, Fernando Henrique Westphalen, Vânia Portela Ditzel Westphalen
      Pages: 417 - 421
      Abstract: Camila Paiva Perin, Vula Papalexiou, Aline Cristina Batista Rodrigues Johann, Natanael Henrique Ribeiro Mattos, Fernando Henrique Westphalen, Vânia Portela Ditzel Westphalen
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):417-421
      Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of acetazolamide combined with different agents as intracanal medication in late reimplanted rat teeth. Materials and Methods: In 100 Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups of 20, one of the following medications was used: Acetazolamide liquid (AL); AL with calcium hydroxide powder (ALHC); acetazolamide powder with AL; acetazolamide powder with physiological solution; and calcium hydroxide with physiological solution (control). At 30 and 60 days after reimplantation, the animals were sacrificed, tissues were processed, and cuts were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. An optical microscope was used to determine the following: percentage of inflammatory root resorption (RRI); percentage of substitute root resorption (RRS); and presence of ankylosis. The data obtained was submitted for statistical analysis. Results: Group ALHC had a significantly higher RRS than the control group at 60 days (P = 0.01). Group AL showed significantly less ankylosis than the other groups, including the control, at 30 days. AL showed results similar to those of the control group with respect to RRS. Conclusion: Acetazolamide has the potential to be an effective intracanal medication.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):417-421
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_191_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Modulating toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses following
           exposure of whole cell and lipopolysaccharide component from Porphyromonas
           gingivalis in wistar rat models

    • Authors: Sindy Cornelia Nelwan, Ricardo Adrian Nugraha, Anang Endaryanto, Indrawati Retno
      Pages: 422 - 426
      Abstract: Sindy Cornelia Nelwan, Ricardo Adrian Nugraha, Anang Endaryanto, Indrawati Retno
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):422-426
      Objective: To explore host innate inflammatory response and the signal pathway induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis by measuring level of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 activity. Materials and Methods: Animal experimental study with pretest-posttest controlled group design were done between January 1 and December 10, 2016. . Total of 28 wistar rats had been used, randomized into 7 groups, each were given various dose of intra-sulcural injection of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide. Statistical Analysis: Normality were measured by Shapiro–Wilk test, while statistical analysis made by ANOVA, t test, Pearson, and linear regression model.. Results: At day 0, no significant difference TLR2 and TLR4 level were measured. At day 4, there is a slight difference between TLR2 and TLR4 level in each group. At day 11, there is a significant difference between TLR2 and TLR4 level in each group. Group with exposure of whole cell will develop greater TLR2 but lower TLR4 level. In the contrary, group with exposure of LPS will develop greater TLR4 but lower TLR2 level. Conclusion: Our data supported that P. gingivalis played a vital role in the pathogenesis of pathogen-induced inflammatory responses in which TLR2 and TLR4 have different molecular mechanisms following recognition of pathogens and inflammatory response.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):422-426
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_147_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • The effect of toothpastes with bleaching agents on the force decay of
           elastomeric orthodontic chains

    • Authors: Mohammad Behnaz, Kazem Dalaie, Sepanta Hosseinpour, Fatemeh Namvar, Leila Kazemi
      Pages: 427 - 431
      Abstract: Mohammad Behnaz, Kazem Dalaie, Sepanta Hosseinpour, Fatemeh Namvar, Leila Kazemi
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):427-431
      Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of agents available in whitening toothpastes (Crest® and Sensodyne®) in vitro on the force decay of elastomeric chains used in orthodontics. Materials and Methods: A total of 300 specimens of elastomeric chains were divided into five groups (n = 60) and were evaluated. These groups included (1) the regular Crest® toothpaste and distilled water solution, (2) whitening Crest® toothpaste and distilled water solution, (3) regular Sensodyne® toothpaste and distilled water solution, (4) whitening Sensodyne® toothpaste and distilled water solution, and (5) distilled water as a control group. The samples' force was measured using Instron at intervals of 0, 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: At the initial time point, the difference in the force values of elastomeric chain between any of the groups was not significant (P > 0.05). On the 1st day, there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) between all groups except the groups of whitening Crest®, regular, and whitening Sensodyne® (P > 0.05). On days 7, 14, and 28, the rate of decline for all groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: According to the results obtained in the present study, it seems that toothpastes without whitening agents have less effect on force decay of elastomeric chain over time.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):427-431
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_83_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Shade changing effectiveness of plasdone and blue covarine-based whitening
           toothpaste on teeth stained with chlorhexidine and black tea

    • Authors: Vania Bergesch, Fl&#225;vio Henrique Baggio Aguiar, Cecilia Pedroso Turssi, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes Fran&#231;a, Roberta Tarkany Basting, Fl&#225;via Lucisano Botelho Amaral
      Pages: 432 - 437
      Abstract: Vania Bergesch, Flávio Henrique Baggio Aguiar, Cecilia Pedroso Turssi, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes França, Roberta Tarkany Basting, Flávia Lucisano Botelho Amaral
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):432-437
      Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of toothbrushing with whitening toothpaste in altering the shade of stained human enamel. Materials and Methods: Thirty fragments of human enamel, stained with chlorhexidine/black tea underwent 1000 and 5000 brushing cycles (BC) with (n = 10): PLS (Gel Dental Day, Bitufo), Close Up White Now, Unilever (COVB) and regular (Gel Dental Night, Bitufo) toothpaste. Images were taken before staining (baseline), after staining (STN) and following 1000 and 5000 BC and were analyzed using the CIELAB parameters (ΔE, Δb and ΔL). Statistical Analysis Used: Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Results: ΔE was higher from STN to baseline; 1000 BC to STN and 5000 BC to STN (P < 0.001). Significant differences in Δb values were found from 1000 BC to STN and 5000 BC to STN. For COVB, greater ΔL was observed from 1000 BC to STN, what differed statistically from the regular toothpaste (P < 0.05). There was no difference between toothpaste when ΔL was calculated from 5000 CB to STN. Conclusions: Toothpaste containing COVB or PLS in association with 5000 BCs showed similar effectiveness in changing enamel shade; but after the first 1000 toothbrushing cycles, the use of COVB toothpaste promoted higher lightness in stained enamel.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):432-437
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_97_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • X-ray diffraction analysis of hydroxyapatite-coated in different plasma
           gas atmosphere on Ti and Ti-6Al-4V

    • Authors: Ravindra Kotian, P Prasad Rao, Prashanthi Madhyastha
      Pages: 438 - 446
      Abstract: Ravindra Kotian, P Prasad Rao, Prashanthi Madhyastha
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):438-446
      Objective: The aim is to study the effect of plasma working gas on composition, crystallinity, and microstructure of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated on Ti and Ti-6Al-4V metal substrates. Materials and Methods: Ti and Ti-6Al-4V metal substrates were coated with HA by plasma spray using four plasma gas atmospheres of argon, argon/hydrogen, nitrogen, and nitrogen/hydrogen. The degree of crystallinity, the phases present, and microstructure of HA coating were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Results: Variation in crystallinity and the microstructure of HA coating on plasma gas atmosphere was observed. Micro-cracks due to thermal stresses and shift in the 2θ angle of HA compared to feedstock was seen. Conclusion: Plasma gas atmosphere has a significant influence on composition, crystallinity, and micro-cracks of HA-coated dental implants.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):438-446
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_100_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • The clinical evaluation of platelet-rich plasma on free gingival
           graft's donor site wound healing

    • Authors: Mahmoud Khosravi Samani, Bardia Vadiati Saberi, SM Ali Tabatabaei, Mahdjoube Goldani Moghadam
      Pages: 447 - 454
      Abstract: Mahmoud Khosravi Samani, Bardia Vadiati Saberi, SM Ali Tabatabaei, Mahdjoube Goldani Moghadam
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):447-454
      Objective: It has been proved that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) can promote wound healing. In this way, PRP can be advantageous in periodontal plastic surgeries, free gingival graft (FGG) being one such surgery. Materials and Methods: In this randomized split-mouth controlled trial, 10 patients who needed bilateral FGG were selected, and two donor sites were randomly assigned to experience either natural healing or healing-assisted with PRP. The outcome was assessed based on the comparison of the extent of wound closure, Manchester scale, Landry healing scale, visual analog scale, and tissue thickness between the study groups at different time intervals. Statistical Analysis Used: Repeated measurements of analysis of variance and paired t-test were used. Statistical significance was P ≤ 0.05. Results: Significant differences between the study groups and also across different time intervals were seen in all parameters except for the changes in tissue thickness. Conclusion: PRP accelerates the healing process of wounds and reduces the healing time.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):447-454
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_76_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • A survey of fissure sealants and dental caries prevalence in the first
           permanent molars among primary school girls in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    • Authors: Hessa M Alwayli, Sattam A Alshiha, Yazeed K Alfraih, Mohammed A Hattan, Abdullah A Alamri, Mohammed S Aldossary
      Pages: 455 - 460
      Abstract: Hessa M Alwayli, Sattam A Alshiha, Yazeed K Alfraih, Mohammed A Hattan, Abdullah A Alamri, Mohammed S Aldossary
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):455-460
      Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of caries and fissure sealants on the first permanent molars (FPMs) among 6–9-year-old girls in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: The FPMs of 17,891 school girls from 120 randomly selected public primary schools were evaluated by visual and tactile examination for the carious status and the presence of fissure sealants. Chi-square test was used to analyze the data at level of 5%. Results: A total of 58,140 FPMs were assessed in the 17,891 children. Nearly 64.6% of the children were caries free. Only 1.3% of the children had at least one fissure sealant applied. At tooth level, the decayed FPMs counted for 24.6%. There was obvious underutilization of fissure sealants on the FPMs; 0.8% (n = 478). The caries prevalence in the mandibular FPMs (33%) was significantly higher than in the maxillary FPMs, 18.2% (P < 0.01). The proportion of carious FPMs increased with age of the children significantly (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the proportion of the presence of fissure sealants among the three different grade/age groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Caries prevalence in the FPMs was high and serious among this cohort of young students. This was contrasting the very low prevalence of fissure sealants.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):455-460
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_189_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Dental students&#39; knowledge of medication-related osteonecrosis
           of the jaw

    • Authors: Daniele Rosella, Piero Papi, Giorgio Pompa, Mario Capogreco, Francesca De Angelis, Stefano Di Carlo
      Pages: 461 - 468
      Abstract: Daniele Rosella, Piero Papi, Giorgio Pompa, Mario Capogreco, Francesca De Angelis, Stefano Di Carlo
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):461-468
      Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and assess knowledge and attitude of dental students about medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ), to optimize future training programs in this field. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was administrated. Ninety-eight participants agreed to complete an anonymous questionnaire. It was divided into two sections: the first section was about general information such as interviewer's gender and date of birth; the second section included questions about bisphosphonates (BPs), others medication associated to osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), risk factors, and prevention of osteonecrosis. Descriptive statistics were computed and the odds ratio was used to compare the odds for the groups. Results: Ninety-nine percent of participants declared to know BPs, but only 26.9% of 4th year and 34.8% of 6th year students knew the correct definition of MRONJ. Almost all of students identified the importance to report, in anamnesis, the use of BPs, as well as to check-up patients before the beginning of treatment; on the other hand, the knowledge about how invasive dental treatment might be carried out in patients under therapy was not adequate. In addition, half of the students did not recognize any active principle or commercial name of BPs. The situation was even worse regarding alternative drugs involved in ONJ. Conclusions: These findings are alarming and the lack of knowledge about MRONJ suggests that greater educational efforts should be performed about this pathology at undergraduate level.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):461-468
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_27_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Smartphone application as an aid in determination of caries risk and
           prevention: A pilot study

    • Authors: Veerale Panchal, Deepa Gurunathan, AK Shanmugaavel
      Pages: 469 - 474
      Abstract: Veerale Panchal, Deepa Gurunathan, AK Shanmugaavel
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):469-474
      Objective: To assess the dietary and oral hygiene pattern before and after the usage of cariometer app. Materials and Methods: Dietary score recorded by cariometer was assessed for 7 days for preschool children in the age group of 2–6 years. The frequency of brushing and mouth rinsing was assessed before and after the usage of app. Paired t-test was conducted to compare the dietary score, brushing frequency, and rinsing frequency pre and post the use of the app. Results: There was a significant improvement in the dietary pattern followed by the patients at the day 7 as compared to day 1. About 90% of children brushed twice at day 7 of the use of cariometer. There was a significant increase in the frequency of rinsing after meals at day 7 as compared to day 1 of the use of cariometer. Conclusion: There was a significant improvement in the dietary pattern and the oral hygiene habit after the use of app.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):469-474
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_190_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Impact of preventive care orientation on caries status among preschool
           children

    • Authors: Hisham Yehia El Batawi, Kausar Sadia Fakhruddin
      Pages: 475 - 479
      Abstract: Hisham Yehia El Batawi, Kausar Sadia Fakhruddin
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):475-479
      Objective: This study aims to study the impact of preventive care orientation given to caregivers of child daycare centers on their knowledge and on the prevalence of early childhood caries (ECC) among preschool children. Materials and Methods: Caregivers of twenty child daycare centers in Emirate of Sharjah were interviewed and 435 children attending these centers were surveyed for decayed missing filled teeth (dmft). The sample data were analyzed using t-tests and one-way ANOVA to assess the statistical significance of the differences in dmft score found between groups. Results: No significant correlation was found between dmft scores and family income of urban or rural centers, mothers' level of education, mothers' employment status in public centers, and frequency of dental visits. There was a significant correlation between dmft scores and mothers' employment status in private centers with the lowest scores among children of working mothers. High caries rates were observed in children attending private daycare centers where sweetened milk, juices, and snacks were served more frequently. There was a significant difference between private and public centers in caregivers' level of knowledge regarding oral health in favor of the latter. Low dmft scores were found to be associated with high level of knowledge of caregivers in public centers. Conclusions: Children are more likely to develop ECC if their caregivers are lacking knowledge or regular provision of preventive care orientation. This makes caregivers and school teachers better candidates for oral health education programs than parents.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):475-479
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_170_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • The prevalence of halitosis (oral malodor) and associated factors among
           dental students and interns, Lahore, Pakistan

    • Authors: Muhammad Ashraf Nazir, Khalid Almas, Muhammad Irfan Majeed
      Pages: 480 - 485
      Abstract: Muhammad Ashraf Nazir, Khalid Almas, Muhammad Irfan Majeed
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):480-485
      Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of halitosis and the factors associated with it among dental students and interns in Lahore, Pakistan. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was chosen, and a sample of dental students and interns was collected from seven dental colleges in Lahore, Pakistan. A total of 833 participants were approached in person as convenient sample population. A self-reported questionnaire was administered and informed consent was obtained. The associations between oral malodor and different variables of the study were explored using analytical statistics (Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis). Statistical significance was determined using a 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: Six hundred and fifteen participants (aged 19–27 years) completed the survey with a response rate of 73.8%. The prevalence of self-reported halitosis was 75.1%. More female (51.4%) than male students (23.7%) reported oral malodor, and most participants (61%) reported early morning halitosis. Thirteen percent of respondents had examination for oral malodor by a dentist and 37.6% treated the condition with self-medication. Binary logistic regression model showed that male gender (odds ratio [OR] =0.44, CI = 0.22–0.87), daily use of dental floss (OR = 0.28, CI = 0.13-0.58), and drinking tea with mint (OR = 0.44, CI = 0.22–0.89) were significantly associated with oral malodor. The participants with tongue coating had higher odds (OR = 2.75, CI = 1.13–6.69) of having oral malodor than those without tongue coating, and the association was statistically significant. Conclusions: The study identified high prevalence of oral malodor among dental students and interns. They should receive appropriate diagnosis and management of the condition from dentist. The regular use of dental floss and removal of tongue coating can significantly reduce halitosis.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):480-485
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_142_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • The effect of two cross-linking agents on dentin bond strength of
           resin-modified glass ionomer

    • Authors: Fereshteh Shafiei, Maryam Firouzmandi, Moona Zamanpour
      Pages: 486 - 490
      Abstract: Fereshteh Shafiei, Maryam Firouzmandi, Moona Zamanpour
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):486-490
      Objectives: The hybrid layer at the interface of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and dentin is prone to degradation by endogenous matrix metalloproteinases. We aimed to investigate the effect of two types of collagen crosslinkers, carbodiimide and proanthocyanidin (PA), on immediate and medium-term bond strength of a resin-modified glass ionomer to dentin. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two molars were flattened on the occlusal surface to expose dentin. The specimens were divided into control, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropy) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC), and PA groups (n = 24). In the EDC and PA groups, carbodiimide and PA solutions were applied for 1 min, respectively. Resin-modified glass ionomer was bonded. Half of the specimens in each group were tested for shear bond strength after 24 h and the other half were tested after 6 months. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed with SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA), using two-way ANOVA, and subgroup analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, and t-test. Results: Two-way ANOVA showed that treatment and time affected the bond strength. Carbodiimide and PA did not affect the immediate bond strength (P = 0.51). After 6 months, the bond strength of the EDC group was significantly lower than that of the control and PA groups. Bond strength of the control and PA groups increased after 6 months (P ≤ 0.002). Conclusion: PA did not interfere with maturation of RMGIC unlike carbodiimide. Therefore, it can be suggested as an matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor before bonding of resin-modified glass ionomer to dentin.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):486-490
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_258_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Comparative evaluation of calcium phosphate-based varnish and
           resin-modified glass ionomer-based varnish in reducing dentinal
           hypersensitivity: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    • Authors: Harshul Sharma, Charu Gupta, Sophia Thakur, Sanjeev Srivastava
      Pages: 491 - 495
      Abstract: Harshul Sharma, Charu Gupta, Sophia Thakur, Sanjeev Srivastava
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):491-495
      Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of MI varnish and Clinpro XT varnish in reducing dentinal hypersensitivity. Materials and Methods: Patients with cervical dentinal hypersensitivity were selected for the study. The teeth to be tested were isolated. Then, a blast of air and ice cold water was applied on the tooth surface, and the score was measured by visual analog scale. The patients were randomly assigned to one of the treatment groups (Group 1: MI varnish; Group 2; Clinpro XT varnish). The manufacturer's instructions were followed. The sensitivity scores were recorded immediately and after 1 week of therapy. Statistical Analysis: Mann–Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon-matched pairs test were used for the analysis. Results and Conclusion: Although both varnishes were shown to reduce the dentinal hypersensitivity in patients, according to statistics, MI Varnish was a better agent to reduce dentinal hypersensitivity than Clinpro XT varnish.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):491-495
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_127_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • On the synthesis and characterization of β-tricalcium phosphate
           scaffolds coated with collagen or poly (D, L-lactic acid) for alveolar
           bone augmentation

    • Authors: Isadora S Deschamps, Gabriel L Magrin, Ricardo S Magini, M&#225;rcio C Fredel, Cesar A. M Benfatti, J&#250;lio C M. Souza
      Pages: 496 - 502
      Abstract: Isadora S Deschamps, Gabriel L Magrin, Ricardo S Magini, Márcio C Fredel, Cesar A. M Benfatti, Júlio C M. Souza
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):496-502
      Objectives: After tooth loss, dimensional alterations on the alveolar bone ridge can occur that can negatively affect the placement of dental implants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the synthesis, and mechanical properties of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds coated with bioabsorbable polymers, namely, collagen and poly (D, L-lactic acid) (PDLLA). Materials and Methods: β-TCP powder was obtained by reactive milling and then characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). β-TCP scaffolds were obtained by replica method, in which polyurethane foams are immersed in β-TCP suspension and thereafter submitted to a thermal treatment to remove the polyurethane and sinter the ceramic. Type-I collagen or PDLLA were used to coat the β-TCP scaffolds by dip-coating method. Scaffolds were separated in four groups depending on the coating material: noncoated (Group A), double immersion in collagen (Group B), double immersion in PDLLA (Group C), and ten immersions in PDLLA (Group D). Samples were characterized by compressive tests and SEM/EDS. Data were statistically analyzed through two-way ANOVA (p = 0.05). Results: Chemical and microscopic analyses revealed proper morphology and chemical composition of powder particles and scaffolds with or without polymeric coatings. Scaffolds coated with PDLLA showed higher compressive strength (0.11 ± 0.054 MPa) than those of collagen (0.022 ± 0.012 MPa) or noncoated groups (0.024 ± 0.012 MPa). Conclusions: The coating method of β-TCP with PDLLA revealed a potential strategy to increase the mechanical strength of porous ceramic materials while collagen can enhance cell migration.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):496-502
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_4_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Cytotoxic and the proliferative effect of cuttlefish bone on MC3T3-E1
           osteoblast cell line

    • Authors: La-ongthong Vajrabhaya, Suwanna Korsuwannawong, Rudee Surarit
      Pages: 503 - 507
      Abstract: La-ongthong Vajrabhaya, Suwanna Korsuwannawong, Rudee Surarit
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):503-507
      Objective: To evaluate the cytotoxic and the proliferative effect of cuttlefish bone on MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cell line. Materials and Methods: MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with 0.5, 1, 5, 25, 50, 100, or 200 μg/ml cuttlefish bone powder (CBP). Cytotoxicity was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. This assay was also used to determine cell proliferation over 16 days of treatment with 0.5, 25, or 100 μg/ml CBP. Results: CBP was not cytotoxic to MC3T3-E1 cells at any concentration. The percentage of cell viability in the 0.5–200 μg/ml CBP groups dose dependently decreased from 107.52 ± 11.03 to 92.48 ± 5.60%; however, the differences between the groups or the negative control group were not significant. At 16 days, 0.5, 25, and 100 μg/ml CBP groups showed 123.19 ± 10.07%, 126.02 ± 15.69%, and 133.33 ± 11.74% proliferation, respectively, that were significantly higher than that of the control group. Conclusion: These results indicate that CBP promotes osteoblast proliferation and may be a potential material to increase the number of osteoblasts in a bone defect in the oral cavity.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):503-507
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_159_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Effectiveness of platelet-rich fibrin in the management of pain and
           delayed wound healing associated with established alveolar osteitis (dry
           socket)

    • Authors: Ashish Sharma, Nimish Aggarwal, Sanjay Rastogi, Rupshikha Choudhury, Siddhi Tripathi
      Pages: 508 - 513
      Abstract: Ashish Sharma, Nimish Aggarwal, Sanjay Rastogi, Rupshikha Choudhury, Siddhi Tripathi
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):508-513
      Objective: To assess the efficacy of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) on the pain and healing of the extraction socket related with established alveolar osteitis (dry socket, AO) after the removal of maxillary and mandibular molars. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive adult patients with age group ranging from 18 to 40 years along with established dry socket after maxillary and mandibular molar extractions who have not received any treatment for the same were included in this single-arm clinical trial. PRF was placed in the maxillary and mandibular molar extraction sockets after adequate irrigation of the socket. All the patients evaluated for the various study variables which include pain, degree of inflammation, and healthy granulation tissue formation (wound healing) at the 1st, 3rd, 7th, and 14th post-PRF placement day in the alveolar socket. Data were analyzed using Shapiro-Wilk's test, Chi-square test and/or Student's t-test, Friedman's test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and Bonferroni test, with the significance level set at P < 0.05. Results: There was significant reduction in pain associated with AO at the 3rd and 7th post-PRF placement day in the extraction socket along with mark decrease in the degree of inflammation at the 3rd post-PRF placement day, and there was better wound healing by the end of the 2nd week. Conclusion: The use of PRF in this clinical trial illustrates the promising results in terms of reduced pain and better healing in the patients with sustained AO.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):508-513
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_346_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Smile esthetics: Impact of variations in the vertical and horizontal
           dimensions of the maxillary lateral incisors

    • Authors: Amjad Al Taki, Ahmad Mohammad Hamdan, Ziad Mustafa, Mawada Hassan, Sami Abu-Alhuda
      Pages: 514 - 520
      Abstract: Amjad Al Taki, Ahmad Mohammad Hamdan, Ziad Mustafa, Mawada Hassan, Sami Abu-Alhuda
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):514-520
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of trained dental professionals and laypersons toward the esthetic impact of variations in the vertical position, width, and gingival height of the maxillary lateral incisor. Materials and Methods: The present study analyzed the perspective of smile photographs by dental professionals such as “fifty orthodontics and fifty general dental practitioners (GDPs)” as well as fifty laypersons, consisting of an equal number of male and female participants. Photographs edited to depict alteration of golden proportion, incisal length, and gingival height of lateral incisor. SPSS software was used to analyze the data and determine the significant difference within all the participants, at 0.05% level (95% confidence interval). Results: There was no significant difference in ranking between the genders. Golden proportion of 62%–67% were ranked the highest by orthodontists, whereas GDPs and laypersons preferred 67%. Regarding gingival display, corrected height of −0.5 and −1 mm received highest ranking from all the three groups. In case of lateral incisal length, −0.5 mm was ranked highest by laypersons, in contrast to −1 mm by orthodontists and GDPs. Conclusion: Specific differences were observed in the ranking of smile esthetics by health-care professionals and laypersons. Golden proportion of 62% and 67% were ranked the highest by orthodontists, whereas GDPs and laypersons preferred 67%. Corrected gingival height of −0.5 and −1 mm received highest ranking from all the three groups. In case of lateral incisal length, −0.5 mm was ranked highest by laypersons, in contrast to −1 mm by orthodontists and GDPs.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):514-520
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_351_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Awareness of basic life support among Saudi dental students and interns

    • Authors: Hashem Motahir Al-Shamiri, Sadeq Ali Al-Maweri, Bassam Shugaa-Addin, Nader Ahmed Alaizari, Abdulrahman Hunaish
      Pages: 521 - 525
      Abstract: Hashem Motahir Al-Shamiri, Sadeq Ali Al-Maweri, Bassam Shugaa-Addin, Nader Ahmed Alaizari, Abdulrahman Hunaish
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):521-525
      Objective: Fatal medical emergencies may occur at any time in the dental clinic. The present study assessed the level of awareness and attitudes toward basic life support (BLS) among Saudi dental students and interns. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire comprising 23 closed-ended questions was used in this survey. The first part of the questionnaire assessed the demographical profile of the students such as age, gender, and educational level. The second part investigated their knowledge and awareness about BLS. Data from 203 respondents were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Studies version 22.0. Results: The response rate was 81.2%. Overall, the respondents showed a low level of knowledge with significant differences between males and females (<0.001). Surprisingly, final-year dental students showed relatively better knowledge than interns though the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates poor knowledge among dental students regarding BLS and showed the urgent need for continuous refreshing courses for this critical topic.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):521-525
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_44_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Dental prosthetic status and prosthetic needs of geriatric patients
           attending the College of Dentistry, Al Jouf University, Kingdom of Saudi
           Arabia

    • Authors: Bader K AlZarea
      Pages: 526 - 530
      Abstract: Bader K AlZarea
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):526-530
      Objective: To evaluate the dental prosthetic status and prosthetic needs of geriatric patients attending the College of Dentistry, Al Jouf University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: Patients aged 60 years and above were included in this study. The World Health Organization oral health assessment pro forma was employed to record the data pertaining to the prosthetic status and prosthetic treatment needs of participants. Data obtained were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA) Version 20.0. Differences in proportions were compared using the Chi-square test. Results: Out of 286 edentulous patients, 69.06% needed some form of prosthetic treatment, 73.77% did not have any prosthesis in upper arch, and 80.06% did not have any prosthesis in lower arch. Out of 162 males, 32.09% and 26.54% had prosthesis in upper and lower arch, respectively. Among 124 females, 18.54% and 19.35% had prosthesis in upper and lower arch, respectively. In males, the need for any type of prosthesis in upper and lower arch was 68.51% and 75.92%, respectively. In females, the need for prosthesis in upper and lower arch was 57.25% and 72.58%, respectively. The need for multiunit prosthesis was more in both arches in both genders. The need for complete denture and combination of single- or multiunit prosthesis was more among the males as compared to females in maxilla and vice versa for mandible. Conclusion: The observations of this study propose that the greater part of the prosthetic needs were insufficient among the geriatric people.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):526-530
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_69_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of child preference for dentist attire and usage of camouflage
           syringe in reduction of anxiety

    • Authors: Prashant Babaji, Pavni P Chauhan, Vikram Rathod, Swapnil Mhatre, Uttam Paul, Guneet Guram
      Pages: 531 - 536
      Abstract: Prashant Babaji, Pavni P Chauhan, Vikram Rathod, Swapnil Mhatre, Uttam Paul, Guneet Guram
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):531-536
      Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the child preference for dentist attire and camouflage versus conventional syringe in reduction of anxiety. Materials and Methods: A total of 600 children aged 6–14 years were made to look at a set of six photos of an individual dressed with different colored apron of pink, green, blue, white colors, formal dress, and cartoon character along with conventional syringe and camouflage syringe with a toy-like appearance to permit injection of local anesthesia. Children's anxiety level during injections and with colored coat was assessed and recorded using the Modified Child Dental Anxiety Scale faces version. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS statistical software version 21 and using Chi-square test. Results: Among age group of 6–8 years, 65.33% selected colorful apron, while other age groups 9–10, 11–12 years, and 13–14 years selected 47.34%, 57.34%, and 50.67% white coat, respectively (P < 0.05). For syringe, 78% of younger age group (6–10 years) preferred camouflage syringe, whereas 71% of older age group (11–14 years) preferred conventional syringe. Anxiety level of all children for syringe was more compared to that of white coat. Conclusion: Younger children prefer colorful attire of dentist and camouflage syringe over conventional compared to older one.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):531-536
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_223_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Self-ligating versus conventional metallic brackets on Streptococcus
           mutans retention: A systematic review

    • Authors: Juliano N Longoni, Beatriz M. V Lopes, Irlan A Freires, Kamile L Dutra, Ademir Franco, Luiz R Paranhos
      Pages: 537 - 547
      Abstract: Juliano N Longoni, Beatriz M. V Lopes, Irlan A Freires, Kamile L Dutra, Ademir Franco, Luiz R Paranhos
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):537-547
      Objective: The present study aimed to review the literature systematically and assess comparatively whether self-ligating metallic brackets accumulate less Streptococcus mutans biofilm than conventional metallic brackets. Material and methods: The systematic search was performed following PRISMA guidelines and registration in PROSPERO. Seven electronic databases (Google Scholar, LILACS, Open Grey, PubMed, SciELO, ScienceDirect, and Scopus) were consulted until April 2016, with no restriction of language and time of publication. Only randomized clinical studies verifying S. mutans colonization in metallic brackets (self-ligating and conventional) were included. All steps were performed independently by two operators. Results: The search resulted in 546 records obtained from the electronic databases. Additionally, 216 references obtained from the manual search of eligible articles were assessed. Finally, a total of 5 studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. In 1 study, the total bacterial count was not different among self-ligating and conventional brackets, whereas in 2 studies the amount was lower for self-ligating brackets. Regarding the specific count of S. mutans, 2 studies showed less accumulation in self-ligating than in conventional brackets. Conclusion: Based on the limited evidence, self-ligating metallic brackets accumulate less S. mutans than conventional ones. However, these findings must be interpreted in conjunction with particularities individual for each patient – such as hygiene and dietary habits, which are components of the multifactorial environment that enables S. Mutans to proliferate and keep retained in the oral cavity.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):537-547
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_132_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Psychological factors in oral mucosal and orofacial pain conditions

    • Authors: Mohammad S Alrashdan, Mustafa Alkhader
      Pages: 548 - 552
      Abstract: Mohammad S Alrashdan, Mustafa Alkhader
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):548-552
      The psychological aspects of chronic pain conditions represent a key component of the pain experience, and orofacial pain conditions are not an exception. In this review, we highlight how psychological factors affect some common oral mucosal and orofacial pain conditions (namely, oral lichen planus, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, burning mouth syndrome, and temporomandibular disorders) with emphasis on the significance of supplementing classical biomedical treatment modalities with appropriate psychological counseling to improve treatment outcomes in targeted patients. A literature search restricted to reports with highest relevance to the selected mucosal and orofacial pain conditions was carried out to retrieve data.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):548-552
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_11_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Abutment misfit in implant-supported prostheses manufactured by casting
           technique: An integrative review

    • Authors: Lorena M. S Pereira, Mariane B Sordi, Ricardo S Magini, Ant&#244;nio R Calazans Duarte, J&#250;lio C M. Souza
      Pages: 553 - 558
      Abstract: Lorena M. S Pereira, Mariane B Sordi, Ricardo S Magini, Antônio R Calazans Duarte, Júlio C M. Souza
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):553-558
      The aim of this study was to perform an integrative review of the literature on the clinically usual prosthesis-abutment misfit over implant-supported structures manufactured by conventional casting technique. The present integrative review used the PRISMA methodology. A bibliographical search was conducted on the following electronic databases: MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine), Scopus (Elsevier), ScienceDirect (Elsevier), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters Scientific), Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information (BIREME), and Virtual Health Library (BVS). A total of 11 relevant studies were selected for qualitative analysis. The prosthetic-abutment vertical misfit considered clinically usual ranged from 50 to 160 μm. The vertical misfit depends on several steps during technical manufacturing techniques, which includes the materials and technical procedures. Lower values in misfit are recorded when precious metal or titanium alloys are utilized. Although a vertical misfit mean value of 100 μm has been considered clinically usual, most of the previous studies included in this revision showed lower mean values.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):553-558
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_162_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Prosthodontic maintenance and peri-implant tissue conditions for
           telescopic attachment-retained mandibular implant overdenture: Systematic
           review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    • Authors: Ahmed Mohamed Keshk, Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi, Radhwan S Algabri, Mostafa S Swedan, Amal Kaddah
      Pages: 559 - 568
      Abstract: Ahmed Mohamed Keshk, Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi, Radhwan S Algabri, Mostafa S Swedan, Amal Kaddah
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):559-568
      The mandibular implant-retained overdentures (MIRO) are a highly successful prosthetic treatment option. However, an argument still present regarding its design and type of attachment system. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to perform a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the scientific literature regarding the telescopic attachments versus other attachment systems retaining mandibular implant overdentures. Manual and electronic database (PubMed and Cochrane) searches were performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing telescopic versus other attachment systems. Independently, two investigators extracted the trials' data. The Cochrane tool was used for assessing the quality of included studies. Meta-analyses were performed for the included RCTs and reported the same outcome measures. Nine RCTs were identified. Three RCTs (corresponding to four publications) were included in the study. The other five trials were excluded from the study. The meta-analysis revealed no difference between telescopic crowns and ball attachment retaining mandibular implant overdenture as regards prosthodontic maintenance. Regarding peri-implant conditions, ball-retained mandibular overdenture showed statistically significant more probing depth around implants records in ball-retained overdenture when compared to the telescopic group. However, there are no statistically significant differences between two interventions in regard to marginal bone loss, bleeding index, gingival index, and plaque index. In conclusions, no significant differences in prosthodontic maintenance and peri-implant condition between telescopic attachments and ball attachments retaining MIRO. However, this should be considered with caution because of a limited number of included studies.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):559-568
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_23_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Dental amalgam fillings and the use of technological devices as an
           environmental factor: Updating the cumulative mercury exposure-based
           hypothesis of autism

    • Authors: Isadora Argou-Cardozo, Jos&#233; Antonio Cano Mart&#237;n, Fares Zeid&#225;n-Chuli&#225;
      Pages: 569 - 570
      Abstract: Isadora Argou-Cardozo, José Antonio Cano Martín, Fares Zeidán-Chuliá
      European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):569-570

      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2017 11(4):569-570
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_222_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 4 (2017)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016