for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover European Journal of Dentistry
  [SJR: 0.496]   [H-I: 11]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1305-7456 - ISSN (Online) 1305-7464
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Salivary point-of-care technology

    • Authors: Zohaib Khurshid
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Zohaib Khurshid
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):1-2

      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):1-2
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_376_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Influence of light activation of simplified adhesives on the shear bond
           strength of resin cements to a leucite-reinforced ceramic

    • Authors: Adilson Yoshio Furuse, Cassiana Koch Scotti, Alfredo Llerena-Icochea, Juliana Fraga Soares Bombonatti, Gisele Aihara Haragushiku, Carla Castiglia Gonzaga
      Pages: 3 - 6
      Abstract: Adilson Yoshio Furuse, Cassiana Koch Scotti, Alfredo Llerena-Icochea, Juliana Fraga Soares Bombonatti, Gisele Aihara Haragushiku, Carla Castiglia Gonzaga
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):3-6
      Objective: This study aims to evaluate the influence of the light activation of simplified adhesives on the shear bond strength of resin cements to a glass-ceramic. Three factors were evaluated: (1) cement in two levels (light cured and dual cured); (2) adhesive in two levels (Single Bond 2 and Single Bond Universal), and (3) light activation in two levels (yes or no). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two 1-mm thick slices of a leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (IPS Empress CAD) were divided into eight groups according to adhesive (Single Bond 2 or Single Bond Universal), cement (AllCem Veneer or AllCem), and light activation of the adhesive before application of the cement (yes or no). Ceramic surfaces were etched for 60 s with 5% hydrofluoric acid, and adhesives were applied. Four cement cylinders were made over each ceramic slice (n = 16) and then submitted to shear bond strength tests. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and Tukey (α = 0.05). Results: There were significant differences between adhesives (P < 0.0001) and no differences between cements (P = 0.0763) and light activation (P = 0.4385). No interaction effect occurred (P = 0.05). Single Bond 2 showed higher bond strength than Single Bond Universal. Conclusions: The light activation of the adhesive before the application of the resin cement did not influence the bond strength.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):3-6
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_307_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Antibacterial effectiveness of probiotic-based experimental mouthwash
           against cariogenic pathogen: An in vitro study

    • Authors: Hanaa Elgamily, Osama Mosallam, Hoda El-Sayed, Rania Mosallam
      Pages: 7 - 14
      Abstract: Hanaa Elgamily, Osama Mosallam, Hoda El-Sayed, Rania Mosallam
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):7-14
      Objectives: The aim of this study is to assess the antibacterial effectiveness of probiotic-experimental-based mouthwash (MW) against Streptococcus mutans in vitro. Materials and Methods: Antimicrobial screening of two active additives (probiotic-zamzam) was tested against S. mutans using disc diffusion method. A total of three MWs ; (1) an experimental MW base formula, (2) an experimental MW base formula with the two active additives, and (3) commercial MW (hexitol), were evaluated against S. mutans by well diffusion method after 24 h and 72 h storage period. The survival profile of probiotic strain in the experimental MW was determined using colony counting method as well as the pH changes at three intervals. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and t-test to compare the inhibition zone diameter. Results: For active additives, probiotic strain exhibited higher mean inhibition zones values than zamzam water against S. mutans. Regarding the inhibition zones for the three tested MWs, the experimental MW showed significant increase in the inhibition zone after 72 h, while there was insignificant change with commercial MW. For probiotic count in MW, there was insignificant change in bacterial count after 24 h, and significant decrease after 15 days, followed by insignificant change after 30 days. For the pH values of the experimental MW, a statistically insignificant change was found after 24 h, significant decrease after 15 days and insignificant change after 30 days. Conclusions: The probiotic-zamzam experimental MW was effective in reducing S. mutans. Zamzam water could be considered as prebiotic ingredient. Therefore, the probiotic-zamzam MW has a potential therapeutic value.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):7-14
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_253_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Dental caries prevalence and its association with fluoride level in
           drinking water in Sana'a, Yemen

    • Authors: Ameen Abdullah Al-Akwa, Sadeq Ali Al-Maweri
      Pages: 15 - 20
      Abstract: Ameen Abdullah Al-Akwa, Sadeq Ali Al-Maweri
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):15-20
      Objectives: Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic condition affecting schoolchildren worldwide. This study is aimed to assess the prevalence of dental caries among schoolchildren in urban and rural districts of Sana'a governorate, Yemen, and to investigate the correlation between caries experience and level of fluoride in drinking water, age, gender, and residence. Materials and Methods: This school-based survey involved 17,599 schoolchildren (aged 6–12 years), of whom 9623 were boys and 7976 were girls. We used decay-missing-filled teeth/decay-filled teeth (DMFT/dft) indices to evaluate dental caries experience. In addition, fluoride concentration in drinking water was investigated. Results: Around 67.6% of children had dental caries. Children residing in urban districts had significantly higher mean scores of DMFT/dft than those in rural areas (P < 0.05). A significant negative correlation between caries experience and fluoride level was found (P < 0.05), with the lowest dft/DMFT scores at the optimum fluoride level of 0.61–2 ppm and the highest at two extremes, 0.0–0.4 ppm and >2 ppm. Conclusion: This survey found a very high prevalence of caries among schoolchildren in Yemen. There was also an inverse relation between dental caries experience and fluoride levels.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):15-20
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_187_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Volumetric analysis of hand, reciprocating and rotary instrumentation
           techniques in primary molars using spiral computed tomography: An in vitro
           comparative study

    • Authors: Ganesh Jeevanandan, Eapen Thomas
      Pages: 21 - 26
      Abstract: Ganesh Jeevanandan, Eapen Thomas
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):21-26
      Objective: This present study was conducted to analyze the volumetric change in the root canal space and instrumentation time between hand files, hand files in reciprocating motion, and three rotary files in primary molars. Materials and Methods: One hundred primary mandibular molars were randomly allotted to one of the five groups. Instrumentation was done using Group I; nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) hand file, Group II; Ni-Ti hand files in reciprocating motion, Group III; Race rotary files, Group IV; prodesign pediatric rotary files, and Group V; ProTaper rotary files. The mean volumetric changes were assessed using pre- and post-operative spiral computed tomography scans. Instrumentation time was recorded. Statistical analysis to access intergroup comparison for mean canal volume and instrumentation time was done using Bonferroni-adjusted Mann–Whitney test and Mann–Whitney test, respectively. Results: Intergroup comparison of mean canal volume showed statistically significant difference between Groups II versus IV, Groups III versus V, and Groups IV versus V. Intergroup comparison of mean instrumentation time showed statistically significant difference among all the groups except Groups IV versus V. Conclusion: Among the various instrumentation techniques available, rotary instrumentation is the considered to be the better instrumentation technique for canal preparation in primary teeth.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):21-26
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_247_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Cariogenicity induced by commercial carbonated beverages in an
           experimental biofilm-caries model

    • Authors: Rodrigo A Giacaman, Vanesa Pailahual, Natalia D&#237;az-Garrido
      Pages: 27 - 35
      Abstract: Rodrigo A Giacaman, Vanesa Pailahual, Natalia Díaz-Garrido
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):27-35
      Objectives: Frequent consumption of sugars-containing carbonated beverages has been associated with caries, but the consequences on the dental biofilm remain unclear. The aim was to evaluate the effect of commercial carbonated beverages and their sugar-free version on enamel and dentine demineralization and on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans biofilms. Materials and Methods: Biofilms of S. mutans UA159 were grown on enamel and dentin slabs and exposed 3 times/day for 5 min, to a commercial cola or orange-flavored carbonated beverage or to their sugar-free version. Biofilms/slabs were recovered to assess biomass, viable microorganisms, protein content and polysaccharides. Demineralization was estimated by the variation of Knoop surface microhardness. Results: Exposures to the biofilm with sugars-containing carbonated beverages resulted in similar biomass, viable microorganisms, proteins, and polysaccharides than sucrose (P < 0.05). The sugar-free cola and orange-flavored drink showed lower effect on the biofilm, as compared with sucrose or their sugared version (P < 0.05). All of the products tested, included the sugar-free, showed higher demineralization than the negative control (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Sugars-containing carbonated beverages enhance cariogenic activity of S. mutans biofilms, comparable with sucrose. Sugar-free carbonated beverages also have a high demineralizing potential, without affecting biofilm properties.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):27-35
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_188_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Comparison of osteoclastogenesis and local invasiveness of ameloblastoma
           and keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    • Authors: Natheer H Al-Rawi, Ammar K Al-Siraj, Ahlam H Majeed
      Pages: 36 - 42
      Abstract: Natheer H Al-Rawi, Ammar K Al-Siraj, Ahlam H Majeed
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):36-42
      Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the expression of receptor-activated nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) with its ligand (RANKL) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) in solid/multicystic ameloblastomas (ABs) and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs). Materials and Methods: The expression of MMP2, RANK, and RANKL molecules was evaluated in 13 ABs and 14 KOTs by immunohistochemistry. The expressions were calculated in the odontogenic epithelial cells as well as the stromal cells. Results: Odontogenic epithelia of AB expressed MMP2, RANK, and RANKL significantly higher than that of KOTs (P < 0.05). The expression of MMP2, RANK, and RANKL was highest in plexiform subtype (79.9%, 81.08%, and 65.1%, respectively). KOTs without daughter epithelia nests expressed both MMP2 and RANK the least (56.06% and 47.5%, respectively). Stromal cells, on the other hand, expressed similar MMP2 pattern in odontogenic epithelia of both AB and KOT. RANKL was expressed weaker in the stromal cells of both lesions. Conclusion: Invasive biological and osteolytic behaviors of both lesions were evaluated in this study. It was found to be more in AB than keratocystic odontogenic. A significant expression of MMP2, RANK, and RANKL in both KOTs associated with microcyst and plexiform type AB as well.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):36-42
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_54_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Conceptual knowledge of oral health among school teachers in South India,
           India

    • Authors: P Jagan, Nusrath Fareed, Hemanth Battur, Sanjeev Khanagar, Manohar Bhat
      Pages: 43 - 48
      Abstract: P Jagan, Nusrath Fareed, Hemanth Battur, Sanjeev Khanagar, Manohar Bhat
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):43-48
      Objective: To measure conceptual oral health knowledge among school teachers using comprehensive measure of oral health knowledge (CMOHK) instrument. Materials and Methods: A total of 240 school teachers drawn through cluster random sampling from across Sullia taluk. Conceptual knowledge was assessed using Comprehensive measure of oral health knowledge questionnaire. Oral health status was recorded on a World Health Organization oral health assessment Proforma. Results: Overall distribution of CMOHK scores revealed that 106(44%) subjects had good conceptual oral health knowledge, 81(33.7%) subjects had fair and 53(22%) subjects were categorized under poor conceptual knowledge respectively. Statistically significant difference was observed for mean scores for conceptual knowledge in relation to gender (12.8v/s 15.3), in terms of type of school teachers (14.4 v/s 11.2) and in relation to age of the subjects. Primary school teachers exhibited a consistently better CMOHK scores 0.003(0.001-0.011) compared to their high school counterparts 0.003(0.001-0.012). Conclusion: The mean CMOHK score of this group was 12.5±1.3 and is considered to be fair. There is an inverse association between age, educational levels and income in relation to CMOHK scores.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):43-48
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_93_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Effect of different surface finishing/polishing procedures on color
           stability of esthetic restorative materials: A spectrophotometric
           evaluation

    • Authors: Riccardo Beltrami, Matteo Ceci, Gabriele De Pani, Lodovico Vialba, Ricaldone Federico, Claudio Poggio, Marco Colombo
      Pages: 49 - 56
      Abstract: Riccardo Beltrami, Matteo Ceci, Gabriele De Pani, Lodovico Vialba, Ricaldone Federico, Claudio Poggio, Marco Colombo
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):49-56
      Objective: To evaluate the color stability of different esthetic restorative materials after surface finishing/polishing with different procedures. Materials and Methods: All materials were polymerized into silicone rubber rings to obtain specimens identical in size. Samples were randomly assigned into four groups (10 specimens of each composite for each group), and they were finished with different procedures: Control group (Group 1), three or two polishers interspersed with diamond grit (Groups 3 and 2, respectively), and one tungsten carbide bur + one polisher interspersed with diamond grit (Group 4). After staining process in coffee, a colorimetric evaluation according to the CIE L*a*b* system was performed by a blind trained operator at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Shapiro–Wilk test and Kruskal–Wallis analysis of variance were applied to assess significant differences among restorative materials. Means of the different polishing/finishing groups were compared with Scheffe's multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. Results: In control group, significant lower discolorations were recorded for Essentia, Admira Fusion, and Estelite. After finishing, Filtek Supreme XTE and Ceram.X Universal showed a significantly lower degree of staining. The finishing technique used for Group 4 produced higher color changes. Conclusions: Tungsten carbide burs produced the higher color variations; after finishing, the nanofilled composites showed lower discoloration than nanohybrid ones, and the time of exposure to the staining agent and the polishing/finishing technique influenced the color change.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):49-56
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_185_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Comparative abrasive wear resistance and surface analysis of dental
           resin-based materials

    • Authors: Maleeha Nayyer, Shahreen Zahid, Syed Hammad Hassan, Salman Aziz Mian, Sana Mehmood, Haroon Ahmed Khan, Muhammad Kaleem, Muhammad Sohail Zafar, Abdul Samad Khan
      Pages: 57 - 66
      Abstract: Maleeha Nayyer, Shahreen Zahid, Syed Hammad Hassan, Salman Aziz Mian, Sana Mehmood, Haroon Ahmed Khan, Muhammad Kaleem, Muhammad Sohail Zafar, Abdul Samad Khan
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):57-66
      Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the surface properties (microhardness and wear resistance) of various composites and compomer materials. In addition, the methodologies used for assessing wear resistance were compared. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using restorative material (Filtek Z250, Filtek Z350, QuiXfil, SureFil SDR, and Dyract XP) to assess wear resistance. A custom-made toothbrush simulator was employed for wear testing. Before and after wear resistance, structural, surface, and physical properties were assessed using various techniques. Results: Structural changes and mass loss were observed after treatment, whereas no significant difference in terms of microhardness was observed. The correlation between atomic force microscopy (AFM) and profilometer and between wear resistance and filler volume was highly significant. The correlation between wear resistance and microhardness were insignificant. Conclusions: The AFM presented higher precision compared to optical profilometers at a nanoscale level, but both methods can be used in tandem for a more detailed and precise roughness analysis.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):57-66
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_380_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Comparative evaluation of salivary malondialdehyde levels as a marker of
           lipid peroxidation in early childhood caries

    • Authors: Divya Subramanyam, Deepa Gurunathan, R Gaayathri, V Vishnu Priya
      Pages: 67 - 70
      Abstract: Divya Subramanyam, Deepa Gurunathan, R Gaayathri, V Vishnu Priya
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):67-70
      Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between lipid peroxidation and dental caries in children with ECC by estimating the levels of MDA in saliva of children. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 children were selected; 75 children with ECC and 75 children without caries (non-ECC). Saliva samples were collected and centrifuged at 12,000 rpm for 24 min at 4°C to obtain a supernatant. MDA levels were estimated by Buege and Aust method by using thiobarbituric acid. The data obtained were analyzed by Student's t-test to compare MDA levels between the groups. Results: MDA levels were higher in children with ECC. There was no statistically significant difference between children with ECC and without ECC (non-ECC). Conclusion: MDA levels were slightly higher in children with ECC, indicating the role of lipid peroxidation in the carious process.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):67-70
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_266_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Digital versus conventional techniques for pattern fabrication of
           implant-supported frameworks

    • Authors: Marzieh Alikhasi, Ahmad Rohanian, Safoura Ghodsi, Amin Mohammadpour Kolde
      Pages: 71 - 76
      Abstract: Marzieh Alikhasi, Ahmad Rohanian, Safoura Ghodsi, Amin Mohammadpour Kolde
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):71-76
      Objective: The aim of this experimental study was to compare retention of frameworks cast from wax patterns fabricated by three different methods. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six implant analogs connected to one-piece abutments were divided randomly into three groups according to the wax pattern fabrication method (n = 12). Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) milling machine, three-dimensional printer, and conventional technique were used for fabrication of waxing patterns. All laboratory procedures were performed by an expert-reliable technician to eliminate intra-operator bias. The wax patterns were cast, finished, and seated on related abutment analogs. The number of adjustment times was recorded and analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis test. Frameworks were cemented on the corresponding analogs with zinc phosphate cement and tensile resistance test was used to measure retention value. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis. Level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean retentive values of 680.36 ± 21.93 N, 440.48 ± 85.98 N, and 407.23 ± 67.48 N were recorded for CAD/CAM, rapid prototyping, and conventional group, respectively. One-way ANOVA test revealed significant differences among the three groups (P < 0.001). The post hoc Tukey test showed significantly higher retention for CAD/CAM group (P < 0.001), while there was no significant difference between the two other groups (P = 0.54). CAD/CAM group required significantly more adjustments (P < 0.001). Conclusions: CAD/CAM-fabricated wax patterns showed significantly higher retention for implant-supported cement-retained frameworks; this could be a valuable help when there are limitations in the retention of single-unit implant restorations.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):71-76
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_314_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Impact of electro-neuro-feedback on postoperative outcome of impacted
           lower third molar surgery

    • Authors: Giacomo Oteri, Michele Pisano, Antonia Marcian&#242;, Gabriele Cervino, Matteo Peditto
      Pages: 77 - 88
      Abstract: Giacomo Oteri, Michele Pisano, Antonia Marcianò, Gabriele Cervino, Matteo Peditto
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):77-88
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a treatment with electro-neuro-feedback (ENF), a portable transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) device, on the clinical outcome and inflammatory biochemical parameters related to the impacted lower third molar surgery. Materials and Methods: A randomized, split-mouth, and single-blind study was conducted on 32 patients requiring lower third molars extractions and referred to the Oral Surgery Unit of the School of Dentistry of the University of Messina. Every patient underwent surgical removal of both lower third molars. The first extraction included a placebo (electrodes placement with turned-off device) treatment following the surgery, while the second had the ENF used next to the avulsion and the following days. Clinical parameters were collected 4 days before, immediately after, 2, 4, and 7 days after the surgical procedure. Biochemical parameters were obtained 1 day before the surgical removal and 7 days after. Data were processed using Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney test, with significance being set at P < 0.05. Results: Clinical outcome parameters showed a significant improvement after the ENF treatment, while considered inflammatory markers expressed different patterns. Conclusions: ENF, a reliable portable TENS device, has demonstrated to be a useful tool in the managing of the postsurgical phases, reducing edema, pain, and consequent pain-killers consumption.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):77-88
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_296_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Increase the glyde path diameter improves the centering ability of F6
           Skytaper

    • Authors: Giuseppe Troiano, Mario Dioguardi, Armando Cocco, Khrystyna Zhurakivska, Domenico Ciavarella, Lorenzo Lo Muzio
      Pages: 89 - 93
      Abstract: Giuseppe Troiano, Mario Dioguardi, Armando Cocco, Khrystyna Zhurakivska, Domenico Ciavarella, Lorenzo Lo Muzio
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):89-93
      Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of glide path preparation, performed with PathGlider 0.15 (Komet Brasseler GmbH & Co., Lemgo, Germany) and PathGlider 0.20 (Komet Brasseler GmbH & Co., Lemgo, Germany), on the centering ability of 25-size F6 Skytaper in J-shape simulated root canals, compared with no glide path executed. Materials and Methods: Sixty J-shaped ISO 15 0.02 taper endo training blocks (Dentsply Maillefer) were assigned to three groups (n = 20 for each group). Photographic images were taken on endoblocks before and after shaping procedures. After superimposition, the software AutoCAD 2013 (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, USA) was used for record the centering and shaping ability at 9 different levels from the apex. Results: Shaping procedures including the using of PathGlider 0.20 resulted in a lower amount of resin removed and in a clear improvement of centering ability of the Skytaper 0.25 at almost all reference point levels. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it could be concluded that the glide path procedure, performed with the PathGlider 0.20 before the shaping with 25-size F6 Skytaper, might determine a lower amount of resin removed and a better centering ability compared with the groups without glide path procedure and those treated with PathGlider 0.15.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):89-93
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_231_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Antimicrobial efficacy of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite, 2%
           chlorhexidine, and ozonated water as irrigants in mesiobuccal root canals
           with severe curvature of mandibular molars

    • Authors: Sergio Luiz Pinheiro, Caio Cesar da Silva, Lucas Augusto da Silva, Marina P Cicotti, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira Bueno, Carlos Eduardo Fontana, Let&#237;cia R Pagrion, Nat&#225;lia P Dalmora, Tha&#237;s T Daque, Francisco UF de Campos
      Pages: 94 - 99
      Abstract: Sergio Luiz Pinheiro, Caio Cesar da Silva, Lucas Augusto da Silva, Marina P Cicotti, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira Bueno, Carlos Eduardo Fontana, Letícia R Pagrion, Natália P Dalmora, Thaís T Daque, Francisco UF de Campos
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):94-99
      Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine, and ozonated water on biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans in mesiobuccal root canals with severe curvature of mandibular molars. Materials and Methods: This was an experimental ex vivo study in microbiologic laboratory. Sixty mesiobuccal root canals with severe curvature of mandibular molars were contaminated with standard strains of E. faecalis, S. mutans, and C. albicans. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n = 15) according to irrigating solution: SH: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite; CH: 2% chlorhexidine; O3: ozonated water; and control: double-distilled water. The mesiobuccal root canals of all groups were instrumented with the WaveOne Gold Primary reciprocating system. Three cycles of instrumentation with three short in-and-out brushing motions were performed: (1) in the coronal third, (2) in the middle third, and (3) in the apical third of the canal. A ProGlider file was used before the first cycle. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test. Samples were collected for viable bacterial counts before and after instrumentation. Results: All groups showed significant biofilm reduction after irrigation (P < 0.01). After instrumentation, sodium hypochlorite (98.07%), chlorhexidine (98.31%), and ozonated water (98.02%) produced a significantly reduction in bacterial counts compared with double-distilled water (control, 72.98%) (P < 0.01). Conclusion: All irrigants tested in this study showed similar antimicrobial activity. Thus, ozonated water may be an option for microbial reduction in the root canal system.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):94-99
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_324_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Physicochemical and microscopic characterization of
           implant&#8211;abutment joints

    • Authors: Patricia A Lopes, Adriana F P. Carreiro, Rubens M Nascimento, Brendan R Vahey, Bruno Henriques, J&#250;lio C M. Souza
      Pages: 100 - 104
      Abstract: Patricia A Lopes, Adriana F P. Carreiro, Rubens M Nascimento, Brendan R Vahey, Bruno Henriques, Júlio C M. Souza
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):100-104
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate Morse taper implant–abutment joints by chemical, mechanical, and microscopic analysis. Materials and Methods: Surfaces of 10 Morse taper implants and the correlated abutments were inspected by field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) before connection. The implant–abutment connections were tightened at 32 Ncm. For microgap evaluation by FEG-SEM, the systems were embedded in epoxy resin and cross-sectioned at a perpendicular plane of the implant–abutment joint. Furthermore, nanoindentation tests and chemical analysis were performed at the implant–abutment joints. Statistics: Results were statistically analyzed via one-way analysis of variance, with a significance level of P < 0.05. Results: Defects were noticed on different areas of the abutment surfaces. The minimum and maximum size of microgaps ranged from 0.5 μm up to 5.6 μm. Furthermore, defects were detected throughout the implant–abutment joint that can, ultimately, affect the microgap size after connection. Nanoindentation tests revealed a higher hardness (4.2 ± 0.4 GPa) for abutment composed of Ti6Al4V alloy when compared to implant composed of commercially pure Grade 4 titanium (3.2 ± 0.4 GPa). Conclusions: Surface defects produced during the machining of both implants and abutments can increase the size of microgaps and promote a misfit of implant–abutment joints. In addition, the mismatch in mechanical properties between abutment and implant can promote the wear of surfaces, affecting the size of microgaps and consequently the performance of the joints during mastication.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):100-104
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_3_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Effect of 0.12% chlorhexidine and zinc nanoparticles on the microshear
           bond strength of dentin with a fifth-generation adhesive

    • Authors: Homayoon Alaghehmad, Elham Mansouri, Behnaz Esmaili, Ali Bijani, Sogol Nejadkarimi, Mohsen Rahchamani
      Pages: 105 - 110
      Abstract: Homayoon Alaghehmad, Elham Mansouri, Behnaz Esmaili, Ali Bijani, Sogol Nejadkarimi, Mohsen Rahchamani
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):105-110
      Objective: In this study, we compared the effects of 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX) and nano zinc oxide (NZO) on the microshear bond strength of dentin with a fifth-generation adhesive after acid etching. Materials and Methods: Forty molar teeth were randomly divided into four main groups based on dentin surface treatment technique (a) control (single bond 2); (b) NZO; (c) CHX; and (d) NZO + CHX. In each group, half of the samples underwent thermocycling, with no thermocycling in the other half. Then, failure mode was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was performed using t-test, two-way ANOVA, and Chi-squared test. Results: The mean microshear bond strength of the groups without thermocycling was more than that of the groups with thermocycling, but there were no statistically significant differences between the groups with and without thermocycling in pair-wise comparisons. Conclusion: Pretreatment with NZO and CHX separately and simultaneously had no effect on the microshear bond strength of a fifth-generation adhesive.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):105-110
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_172_16
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Quality of life of dentists

    • Authors: Sheela B Abraham, Aline Mazen Alsakka Amini, Noha Ehab Khorshed, Manal Awad
      Pages: 111 - 115
      Abstract: Sheela B Abraham, Aline Mazen Alsakka Amini, Noha Ehab Khorshed, Manal Awad
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):111-115
      Objective: An important determinant of job satisfaction and life fulfillment is the quality of life (QOL) of the individuals working in a particular field. Currently, in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), there is limited research pertaining to the QOL of dentists. The main objective of this study was to assess QOL of dentists in the UAE. Materials and Methods: The World Health Organization (WHO) QOL-BREF questionnaire (the World Health Organization abbreviated instrument for QOL assessment), which assesses QOL in physical, psychological, social, and environmental domains, was found to be a suitable instrument for use. A total of 290 questionnaires were distributed to general dental practitioners and specialists working in the private sector. The response rate was 46%. The completed questionnaires were coded and analyzed using the SPSS IBM software version 21. Results: QOL of specialists was significantly better than general practitioners (GPs) on all domains of the WHOQOL-BREF (P < 0.05). Married dentists had better QOL than singles on the social and environmental domains. Furthermore, specialists reported significantly better QOL compared to GPs after adjustment for sex, age, and marital status (P < 0.05) in the psychosocial and environmental domains. Conclusions: Among dentists who work in the UAE, QOL can be affected by several factors, one of them being whether dentist is a GP or a specialist.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):111-115
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_104_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Effect of heat polymerization conditions and microwave on the flexural
           strength of polymethyl methacrylate

    • Authors: Serhat Emre Ozkir, Burak Yilmaz, Server Mutluay Unal, Ahmet Culhaoglu, Isin Kurkcuoglu
      Pages: 116 - 119
      Abstract: Serhat Emre Ozkir, Burak Yilmaz, Server Mutluay Unal, Ahmet Culhaoglu, Isin Kurkcuoglu
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):116-119
      Objective: The objective of this study is the effect of different heat polymerization conditions on the strength of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin base is unknown. Distinguishing one method that provides improved mechanical properties may be beneficial to the clinical success of complete and partial dentures and overdentures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different polymerization methods on the flexural strength of a dental PMMA resin. Materials and Methods: Forty PMMA specimens (64 mm × 10 mm × 4 mm) were prepared with 4 different polymerization methods (n = 10); heat polymerization at 74°C for 9 h, at 100°C for 40 min, and with 620 kPa pressure at 100°C for 20 min. The remaining group of specimens was microwave polymerized at 180 W for 6 min. All specimens were thermocycled at 5°C and 55°C for 5000 times. Three-point flexure test was used to measure the flexural strength of specimens. One-way ANOVA and Tukey Honestly Significant Difference were applied to analyze the differences in flexural strengths (α = 0.05). Results: The flexural strength of heat-polymerized groups was similar. The flexural strength of microwave polymerized group was significantly different and lower than the other groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Polymerizing conventional heat-polymerizing PMMA resin with microwave energy resulted in a significant decrease in flexural strength. The results of this study suggest that clinicians may benefit from using heat polymerization when processing PMMA denture bases instead of microvawe polymerization when tested brand is used.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):116-119
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_199_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • The relationship between tooth loss, body mass index, and hypertension in
           postmenopausal female

    • Authors: Basma Ezzat Mustafa Al-Ahmad, Muhannad Ali Kashmoola, Nazih Shaaban Mustafa, Haszelini Hassan, Mohd Hafiz Arzmi
      Pages: 120 - 122
      Abstract: Basma Ezzat Mustafa Al-Ahmad, Muhannad Ali Kashmoola, Nazih Shaaban Mustafa, Haszelini Hassan, Mohd Hafiz Arzmi
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):120-122
      Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between tooth loss and the level of blood pressure with the hypothesis that tooth loss is associated with the increase of hypertension in postmenopausal women. Materials and Methods: Sixty postmenopausal female patients aged 51–68 years were included in the study to assess the relationship between tooth loss and the level of blood pressure. The information including sociodemographics, last menstruation period, hypertension history, and the duration of having tooth loss was recorded. Blood pressure was measured using sphygmomanometer and the number of tooth loss was determined. Results: The results showed a more significant tooth loss in hypertension (median: 23 + 4; interquartile range [IQR]: 6) compared to the normotension postmenopausal women (median: 18 + 6; IQR: 12; P < 0.05). Furthermore, obese patients had more tooth loss (median: 23 + 5; IQR: 8) than the overweight patients (median: 19 + 8; IQR: 8). Conclusion: Tooth loss is associated with the increase of hypertension in postmenopausal women which may have a role in the development of vascular diseases.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):120-122
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_322_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Analysis of vertical marginal discrepancy in feldspathic porcelain crowns
           manufactured with different CAD/CAM systems: Closed and open

    • Authors: Fabio Kricheldorf, Cleuber Rodrigo de Souza Bueno, Wilson da Silva Amaral, Joel Ferreira Santiago Junior, Hugo Nary Filho
      Pages: 123 - 128
      Abstract: Fabio Kricheldorf, Cleuber Rodrigo de Souza Bueno, Wilson da Silva Amaral, Joel Ferreira Santiago Junior, Hugo Nary Filho
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):123-128
      Objective: The objective of this study is to compare the marginal adaptation of feldspathic porcelain crowns using two computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing systems, one of them is open and the other is closed. Materials and Methods: Twenty identical titanium abutments were divided into two groups: open system (OS), where ceramic crowns were created using varied equipment and software, and closed system (CS), where ceramic crowns were created using the CEREC system. Through optical microscopy analysis, we assess the marginal adaptation of the prosthetic interfaces. The data were subjected to the distribution of normality and variance. The t-test was used for the analysis of the comparison factor between the groups, and the one-way ANOVA was used to compare the variance of crown analysis regions within the group. A significance level of 5% was considered for the analyses. Results: There was a significant difference between the systems (P = 0.007), with the CS group having the higher mean (23.75 μm ± 3.05) of marginal discrepancy when compared to the open group (17.94 μm ± 4.77). Furthermore, there were no differences in marginal discrepancy between the different points between the groups (P ≥ 0.05). Conclusions: The studied groups presented results within the requirements set out in the literature. However, the OS used presented better results in marginal adaptation.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):123-128
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_368_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Impact of malocclusion severity on oral health-related quality of life in
           an Iranian young adult population

    • Authors: Kazem Dalaie, Mohammad Behnaz, Zahra Khodabakhshi, Sepanta Hosseinpour
      Pages: 129 - 135
      Abstract: Kazem Dalaie, Mohammad Behnaz, Zahra Khodabakhshi, Sepanta Hosseinpour
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):129-135
      Objective: This study aimed to assess the relationship between malocclusion severity and oral health-related quality of life (QoL) of 18 to 25-year-old Iranians who sought orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: A total of 126 patients between 18 and 25 years attending some private orthodontic clinics answered the oral health impact profile-14 (OHIP-14) and a demographic questionnaire. Two calibrated orthodontists recorded the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need-Dental Health Component (IOTN-DHC) determining the severity of malocclusion (Kappa = 0.8). The IOTN-Aesthetic Component (IOTN-AC) was reported by patients for assessing the perception of their esthetic severity of malocclusion. Logistic regression analysis was used. Level of significance was set at α = 0.05. Results: The mean score of OHIP-14 was 20.87 ± 8.6. The frequency of patients with no/slight, borderline, and definite need for orthodontic treatment was determined as 13.4%, 23.8%, and 62.7%, respectively, by IOTN-DHC. There were significant correlations between borderline or definite need treatment and OHIP-14 overall score (P < 0.05). Patients with borderline and definite need for orthodontic treatment had 5 and 21 times lower QoL, respectively, than those with a slight need for orthodontic treatment. Based on IOTN-AC, 50.8% of the patients mentioned slight or no need based on IOTN-AC. No significant association was noted between IOTN-AC and OHIP-14 overall scores. Conclusions: The results showed negative impact of malocclusion severity on the QoL. This study highlighted the importance of individual assessment of orthodontic patients.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):129-135
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_61_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Cone-beam computed tomography in the assessment of periapical lesions in
           endodontically treated teeth

    • Authors: Gianluca Gambarini, Lucila Piasecki, Gabriele Miccoli, Gianfranco Gaimari, Dario Di Nardo, Luca Testarelli
      Pages: 136 - 143
      Abstract: Gianluca Gambarini, Lucila Piasecki, Gabriele Miccoli, Gianfranco Gaimari, Dario Di Nardo, Luca Testarelli
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):136-143
      Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the quality of the coronal restoration and the root canal filling on the periapical status of endodontically treated teeth using CBCT. Materials and Methods: CBCT data were obtained from the records of patients who deny any dental treatment in the 2 years prior to the CBCT examination. CBCT images (90 kVp and 7 mA, exposure time of 23 s, and a voxel size of 0.2 mm, with a field of view of 13 cm × 13 cm) of 1011 endodontically treated teeth were observed. A score was given to the quality of the root filling and the quality of the coronal restoration. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were statistically analyzed to correlate the periapical status with gender, dental group. and quality of endodontic treatment and restoration (Chi-square test with a significance level of P < 0.001). Results: Absence of periapical periodontitis was found in 54.9% of the cases. The periapical outcome was not related to gender or dental group (P > 0.05). A statistically significant factor (Chi-square test, P < 0.0001) resulted when different qualities of sealing were compared. Conclusions: CBCT showed that high-quality root canal treatments followed by an adequate coronal sealing restoration avoid the presence of periapical periodontitis in time.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):136-143
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_320_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Relationship between Expanded Disability Status Scale scores and the
           presence of temporomandibular disorders in patients with multiple
           sclerosis

    • Authors: Lucas Senra Corr&#234;a Carvalho, Osvaldo Jos&#233; Moreira Nascimento, Luciane Lacerda Franco Rocha Rodrigues, Andre Palma Da Cunha Matta
      Pages: 144 - 148
      Abstract: Lucas Senra Corrêa Carvalho, Osvaldo José Moreira Nascimento, Luciane Lacerda Franco Rocha Rodrigues, Andre Palma Da Cunha Matta
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):144-148
      Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and to investigate whether an association exists between the presence of TMD symptoms and the degree of MS-related disability. Materials and Methods: In all, 120 individuals were evaluated: 60 patients with a diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS and 60 age- and sex-matched controls without neurological impairments. A questionnaire recommended by the European Academy of Craniomandibular Disorders for the assessment of TMD symptoms was administered. For those who answered affirmatively to at least one of the questions, the RDC/TMD Axis I instrument was used for a possible classification of TMD subtypes. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was the measure of the degree of MS-related disability. Statistical Analysis Used: Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the data. ANOVA was used to detect significant differences between means and to assess whether the factors influenced any of the dependent variables by comparing means from the different groups. Results: The prevalence of TMD symptoms in patients with MS was 61.7% versus 18.3% in the control group (CG). A diagnosis of TMD was established for 36.7% in the MS group and 3.3% in the CG (P = 0.0001). There were statistically significant differences between degrees of MS-related disability and the prevalence of TMD (P = 0.0288). Conclusions: The prevalence of both TMD and TMD symptoms was significantly greater in the MS group. EDSS scores and TMD prevalence rates were inversely related.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):144-148
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_91_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Gingival melanin depigmentation by 810 nm diode laser

    • Authors: Eser Elemek
      Pages: 149 - 152
      Abstract: Eser Elemek
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):149-152
      The color of gingiva is determined by number and size of blood vessels, thickness of epithelium, keratinization degree, and melanin pigments present in epithelium. Melanocytes, located in basal and suprabasal layers of epithelium, are the cells that produce melanin pigments which play a main role for pigmentation of gingiva. In this case series, the use of 810 nm diode laser for depigmentation of gingiva is presented. Two female patients applied with a chief complaint of “darkened gums” due to heavy smoking. In intraoral examination, diffuse melanin pigmentation was observed in both the maxilla and mandible. Under the local anesthesia, 810 nm diode laser was applied for depigmentation at 1.3 W power in continuous mode. Patients were recalled at weeks 1, 4, and 12 to evaluate the healing and recurrence rate. Both the patients had no postoperative pain or edema, and complete healing was observed at week 12. This study revealed that depigmentation with 810 nm diode laser is successful in terms of esthetics and patient comfort.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):149-152
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_373_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Accuracy of computer-guided surgery for dental implant placement in fully
           edentulous patients: A systematic review

    • Authors: Daniel Amaral Alves Marli&#232;re, Maur&#237;cio Silva Dem&#233;trio, Leonardo Santos Picinini, Rodrigo Guerra De Oliveira, Henrique Duque De Miranda Chaves Netto
      Pages: 153 - 160
      Abstract: Daniel Amaral Alves Marlière, Maurício Silva Demétrio, Leonardo Santos Picinini, Rodrigo Guerra De Oliveira, Henrique Duque De Miranda Chaves Netto
      European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):153-160
      Assess clinical studies regarding accuracy between virtual planning of computer-guided surgery and actual outcomes of dental implant placements in total edentulous alveolar ridges. A PubMed search was performed to identify only clinical studies published between 2011 and 2016, searching the following combinations of keywords: “Accuracy AND Computer-Assisted Surgery AND Dental Implants.” Study designs were identified using the terms: Case Reports, Clinical study, Randomized Controlled Trial, Systematic Reviews, Meta-Analysis, humans. Level of agreement between the authors in the study selection process was substantial (k = 0.767), and the study eligibility was considered excellent (k = 0.863). Seven articles were included in this review. They describe the use of bone and muco-supported guides, demonstrating angular deviations cervically and apically ranging from (minimum and maximum means), respectively, 1.85–8.4 (°), 0.17–2.17 (mm), and 0.77–2.86 (mm). Angular deviations obtained most inaccuracy in maxila. For cervical and apical deviations, accuracy was preponderantly lower in maxilla. Despite the similar deviations measurement approaches described, clinical relevance of this study may be useful to warn the surgeon that safety margins in clinical situations.
      Citation: European Journal of Dentistry 2018 12(1):153-160
      PubDate: Thu,15 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ejd.ejd_249_17
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2018)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-