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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
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Journal Cover Journal of Clinical Neonatology
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   ISSN (Print) 2249-4847
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Evaluation of transcutaneous bilirubinometry in term neonates at Lagos
           State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos

    • Authors: Oyejoke Oyapero, O Fidelis Njokanma, E Aruma Disu
      Pages: 213 - 219
      Abstract: Oyejoke Oyapero, O Fidelis Njokanma, E Aruma Disu
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):213-219
      Background: Serum bilirubin can be estimated using a technique that is real-time, noninvasive, painless, fast, and relatively inexpensive technique which is transcutaneous bilirubinometry (TcB). There is a paucity of published research data in Nigeria on TcB, and the aim of this study was to determine the correlation of TcB with total serum bilirubin (TSB) and in a group of term Nigerian neonates at Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH) using the Konica Minolta JM-103. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty neonates were consecutively recruited at LASUTH, and detailed sociodemographic and clinical information was recorded with an interviewer-administered questionnaire. TcB readings were taken on the forehead, sternum, and abdomen of the calm neonate in a supine position, and blood samples for TSB estimation were drawn from a peripheral vein within 10 min of TcB measurement. Results: Eighty-nine (59.3%) neonates were male; 129 (86%) neonates were of 37–39 weeks' gestational age while 56 (37.3%) presented in the clinic after 48 h of life. Over 83% of the neonates had TcB values that were higher than TSB values, and the percentage of neonates with TSB values > 12 mg/dl was 45.2% compared with 56.8% obtained by TcB. The correlation of TcB with TSB using the Pearson's correlation was positive (r = 0.924). The mean error of TcB compared with the TSB level was independent of gender, gestational age, age at presentation, or birth weight. The measured bias by the Bland and Altman method was 0.97 mg/dl (95% confidence interval: 0.74–1.21) while imprecision was ± 2.96 mg/dl. The best correlation at the forehead was r = 0.928. Conclusion: Excellent correlation of TcB with TSB was obtained from this study, and it is envisaged that further researches will be carried out in dark skinned neonates and that the use of the JM-103 will be widely adopted as a screening tool in Nigeria.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):213-219
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_24_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Significant hyperbilirubinemia in near-term and term newborns: A
           case–control Study

    • Authors: Nishanth Rajan, Peter Prasanth Kumar Kommu, Lalitha Krishnan, Manikandan Mani
      Pages: 220 - 224
      Abstract: Nishanth Rajan, Peter Prasanth Kumar Kommu, Lalitha Krishnan, Manikandan Mani
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):220-224
      Background: Hyperbilirubinemia is a common and in most cases, benign problem in neonates. Data in term and near-term infants with respect to the pattern of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia from South India are lacking, hence this study. Aim: The aim was to compare the incidence of significant hyperbilirubinemia between near terms and term neonates. Materials and Methods: A prospective case–control study done in a Tertiary Care Hospital, in South India over a period of 18 months (October 2012–April 2014) involving two hundred and sixty-four infants (cases 132 near-term babies, and 132 terms controls). Setting: Tertiary Care Hospital, in South India over a period of 18 months (October 2012–April 2014). Participants: Two hundred and sixty-four infants, cases 132 near-term babies, and 132 terms controls. Exclusion Criteria: Babies with hemolytic jaundice, polycythemia, hypothyroidism, culture-proven sepsis, major congenital anomalies. Cord and 24 h total serum bilirubin was done on cases and controls and all babies were followed up till 72 h or till discharge for significant hyperbilirubinemia. Results: Mean cord blood bilirubin values were significantly different between the near terms and terms 1.9 ± 1.41 and 1.46 ± 0.50 mg/dl (P = 0.0001). Mean 24 h serum bilirubin was higher in near terms, but the difference was not statistically significant (6.89 ± 0.41 and 6.83 ± 0.34, P = 0.764). Incidence of significant hyperbilirubinemia was statistically higher in the near terms as compared to terms (23/109 vs 7/125, P = 0.002). Conclusion: Although cord blood bilirubin was higher in near-term infants, the 24 h bilirubin did not show any significant difference between the two groups. Clinically, however, significant hyperbilirubinemia requiring phototherapy was significantly higher in near-term infants. There is clearly a requirement for at-risk assessment for severe hyperbilirubinemia before discharge and close follow-up thereafter for near-term infants.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):220-224
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_35_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Clinical profile and short-term outcome of neonates with esophageal
           atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula at tertiary care center in a
           developing country: A 25-year experience

    • Authors: Kamal Nain Rattan, Jasbir Singh, Poonam Dalal
      Pages: 225 - 230
      Abstract: Kamal Nain Rattan, Jasbir Singh, Poonam Dalal
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):225-230
      Background: Despite the advancements in antenatal diagnostic and postnatal management in neonates with esophageal atresia (EA)/tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) resulting in better survival rates in the developed world, the outcome still remains poor in developing countries. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of medical records of neonates who were operated for EA/TEF from 1991 to 2015 at our center was done. Results: A total of 693 neonates were operated during the study period with male-to-female ratio 1.9:1. Mean birth weight was 2300 ± 840 g and mean gestational age was 36 ± 4 weeks. Prenatal diagnosis with ultrasonography screening was done in only 9% cases. Mean age of neonates at referral was 4.3 ± 1.5 days. Frothing from mouth and tachypnea were the most common presenting features seen in 94% and 78% neonates, respectively. Type III EA was the most common variety seen. Incidence of associated anomalies was 52% with congenital heart disease being most common. Overall postoperative survival rate of 57% was observed. In the past 10 years of study, survival improved to 64% in comparison to 48% during initial 15 years. Poor prenatal supervision, aspiration pneumonia, prematurity, low birth weight, delayed referral and inadequate transport facilities, associated congenital anomalies, and lack of advanced Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) facilities were the important contributing factors for high mortality. Conclusion: In developing countries, only improving the NICUs and surgical techniques will not deliver a better outcome in neonates with EA/TEF. Emphasis should be on the strengthening of peripheral health services and transport facilities to achieve good survival rates.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):225-230
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_44_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Early enteral feeding following repair of gastroschisis is associated with
           shorter length of admission and better nutritional outcomes

    • Authors: Patrick James Thompson, Karen Walker, Robert Halliday, Andrew J.A Holland, Amit Trivedi
      Pages: 231 - 235
      Abstract: Patrick James Thompson, Karen Walker, Robert Halliday, Andrew J.A Holland, Amit Trivedi
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):231-235
      Aim: The aim of the study was to review timing and substrate of initial enteral feeding in the management of infants with gastroschisis (GS) with analysis of their relationship to nutritional outcomes and length of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admission. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of consecutive admissions of infants with GS to a quaternary NICU between 2010 and 2016. Demographic, clinical data and data on nutritional status and growth were collected. Relationships between time to initiate enteral feeding and length of NICU admission, duration of parenteral nutrition (PN), and time taken to regain birth weight were assessed, as well as effect of exclusive human milk on length of NICU admission and duration of PN. Results and Conclusions: Survival in this cohort was 100%. Significant positive correlations were found between time taken to initiate enteral feeding after abdominal closure and each of the primary outcomes: length of NICU stay, duration of PN, and time taken to regain birth weight. There was no effect of exclusive human milk feeding on either duration of PN or length of NICU stay. A higher rate of exclusive human milk feeding was observed than in published literature.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):231-235
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_50_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Oxygen content and prediction of packed red blood cell transfusion in
           mechanically ventilated neonate

    • Authors: Mohammad Kamrul Hassan Shabuj, Sadeka Choudhury Moni, Ismat Jahan, Sanjoy Kumer Dey, Md. Abdul Mannan, Mohammod Shahidullah
      Pages: 236 - 239
      Abstract: Mohammad Kamrul Hassan Shabuj, Sadeka Choudhury Moni, Ismat Jahan, Sanjoy Kumer Dey, Md. Abdul Mannan, Mohammod Shahidullah
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):236-239
      Background: Packed blood cell transfusion in mechanically ventilated neonate is a prime necessity to maintain adequate tissue oxygen supply. Hemoglobin (Hb) is the gold standard for making decision of blood transfusion. Hb estimation is time-consuming in relation to arterial blood gas analysis, total oxygen content (CaO2) is one of the components of the blood gas. In this study, we wanted to predict CaO2as a predictor for blood transfusion in mechanically ventilated baby. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted to assess the performance of CaO2to detect the indication of packed red blood cell transfusion in mechanically ventilated neonates. CaO2and corresponding venous hemoglobin were measured in normally perfused baby. Test performance of CaO2with different cut-off value was validated by receiver operating curve, sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Results: Prevalence rate of packed red blood transfusion in mechanically ventilated neonate was 53%. With setting a cut-off value for Hb of 13 g/dl for blood transfusion, the best cut-off value of CaO2for blood transfusion is 18.5 ml/dl and area under curve 0.802, sensitivity is 80% and specificity is 78%, PPV 76%, and NPV 82% and cut value of CaO2off ≤20 ml/dl area under curve 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.95–1) and specificity 93% and PPV 96% and NPV 95%. Conclusion: Our study concluded that CaO2is an excellent predictor of blood transfusion in a positive-pressure ventilated baby, but actual decision should be taken according to clinical condition of the patient.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):236-239
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_52_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Incidence and predictors of acute kidney injury in birth asphyxia in a
           Tertiary Care Hospital

    • Authors: Muhammed Aslam, Sugandha Arya, Harish Chellani, Charanjeet Kaur
      Pages: 240 - 244
      Abstract: Muhammed Aslam, Sugandha Arya, Harish Chellani, Charanjeet Kaur
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):240-244
      Objective: The objective of this study is to estimate the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in birth asphyxia and to find out the predictors of AKI in birth asphyxia in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit of a tertiary care center in Northern India during November 2014– October 2015. Inborn babies admitted here with severe birth asphyxia were included in the study. The neonates were evaluated for the evidence of AKI and were grouped into two groups: Group I (all neonates with severe birth asphyxia as per the WHO definition and having evidence of AKI) and Group II (all neonates with severe birth asphyxia as per the WHO definition and without having evidence of AKI). Those with congenital renal anomalies were excluded from the study. The two groups were then compared. AKI network definition was used to define AKI. Results: The incidence of AKI in the present study was 44.21%. There was no significant difference in incidence between term and preterm neonates, and among various stages of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The majority (95%) had nonoliguric renal failure. Most (92.8%) of the cases recovered before discharge and the rest recovered at 1 month follow-up. Prolonged labor was found to be significantly associated with AKI. Patients with shock had more advanced stages of AKI compared to those without shock. Conclusion: From this study, it can be inferred that it is difficult to predict AKI based on clinical features such as oliguria or Apgar score, and it is better to screen all the birth asphyxia cases for AKI so that they can be detected early and managed accordingly. In addition, a single normal value of blood urea/serum creatinine cannot exclude AKI, and serial monitoring is important. Shock should be detected early and treated aggressively as shock was associated with advanced stages of AKI.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):240-244
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_53_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Comprehensive, noninvasive saturation, oxygen, and pressure index: Does it
           reflect the severity of acute respiratory illness in neonates on
           continuous positive airway pressure? a prospective study

    • Authors: Sushma Krishnegowda, Srinivasa Murthy Doreswamy, Deepti Thandaveshwar
      Pages: 245 - 249
      Abstract: Sushma Krishnegowda, Srinivasa Murthy Doreswamy, Deepti Thandaveshwar
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):245-249
      Background: The severity of respiratory illness in neonates on invasive ventilatory support is assessed by oxygenation index and alveolar–arterial oxygen gradient (A-aDO2). Both these parameters need arterial blood gas estimation which is an invasive procedure with attendant complications. Neonates with less severe respiratory disease are managed on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The progress of the disease is generally assessed by noting the changes in FiO2and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) provided. Blood gas analysis is done for objectively assess the babies who progress to more severe disease. A noninvasive tool such as saturation, oxygen, and pressure index (SOPI) helps in reducing the need for invasive blood gas estimation. A good correlation of SOPI with A-aDO2can provide near-continuous bedside assessment of the respiratory disease. Objective: To determine the correlation between SOPI and A-aDO2. Materials and Methods: All babies admitted to our neonatal unit requiring CPAP were considered eligible for this study. The adjustments in FiO2, CPAP pressures, and arterial blood gas were done as per unit protocol. A-aDO2was calculated. SOPI was calculated as (PEEP × FiO2)/SpO2. The two values were then correlated. Results: Seventy-five babies were recruited. SOPI correlated positively (r = 0.847) with A-aDO2(P < 0.0001). Coefficient of determination (R2) was 0.71. SOPI value of 1.6 had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 90% in predicting the A-aDO2of 70 which was considered as the value indicating severe illness. Conclusion: SOPI is a noninvasive monitoring tool for babies on CPAP support which has a good correlation of 84.7% with A-aDO2.This can be used as an objective currency to report the severity of respiratory illness in neonates on CPAP.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):245-249
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_68_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • A rare association: Bart's syndrome and congenital adrenal hyperplasia
           associated with drugs embryopathy?

    • Authors: Osman Bastug, Ahmet &#214;zdemir, Sabriye Korkut, Levent Korkmaz, H&#252;lya Halis, Tamer G&#252;ne&#351;, Mehmet Adnan &#214;zt&#252;rk, Selim Kurto&#287;lu
      Pages: 250 - 253
      Abstract: Osman Bastug, Ahmet Özdemir, Sabriye Korkut, Levent Korkmaz, Hülya Halis, Tamer Güneş, Mehmet Adnan Öztürk, Selim Kurtoğlu
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):250-253
      Bart's syndrome, which was first described by Bart in 1966, comprises congenital localized absence of skin, congenital epidermolysis bullosa, and associated nail abnormalities. A newborn infant with Bart's syndrome is reported herein since it is a very rare condition, especially when associated with congenital adrenal hyperplasia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report presenting a case of Bart's syndrome associated with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):250-253
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_177_15
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Combination of Anti-G and Anti-D antibodies in alloimmunized pregnant
           female causing severe hemolytic disease of new born

    • Authors: Shiffi Fazal, Mili Satheesh, MK Anupriya, AP Poornima
      Pages: 254 - 258
      Abstract: Shiffi Fazal, Mili Satheesh, MK Anupriya, AP Poornima
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):254-258
      G antigen is present on almost all D+ or C+ cells and absent from virtually all red cells which lack D and C antigens. Anti-G antibody serologically mimics a combination of Anti-C and Anti D. The challenge of anti G in the antenatal setting is to identify whether Anti D is present or not. If anti-D is absent, the female can still get immunized against D antigen, so she will be a candidate to receive Rh immune globulin prophylactic therapy. If anti D is present, the presentation of HDFN may be more severe. So it is important to know if the antibody is really anti G or a combination of anti D and anti C with or without anti G. We here report a case of HDFN which on advanced immunohematolgy work up revealed a combination of Anti G and anti D in mother's serum. Anti-D was present in the mother despite immunoprophylaxis, which indicate inadequate dosage.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):254-258
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_129_16
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Aminophylline-associated hyponatremia in a premature infant

    • Authors: Mohammad Y Bader, Alex Lopilato, Leslie Thompson, Ranjit I Kylat
      Pages: 259 - 261
      Abstract: Mohammad Y Bader, Alex Lopilato, Leslie Thompson, Ranjit I Kylat
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):259-261
      Hyponatremia is common in preterm infants. The causes are usually related to the inability of the premature kidneys to excrete a given water load, excessive sodium losses, or inadequate sodium intake. Here, we present a case of severe hyponatremia in an extreme preterm infant, associated with the use of aminophylline. Aminophylline was administered intravenously on day 1 for the treatment of apnea of prematurity. On day 3, the patient developed hyponatremia which was not responsive to sodium replacement and fluid restriction. Due to concerns of aminophylline-induced hyponatremia, aminophylline was discontinued on day 6, and within 48 h of discontinuation, serum sodium normalized without the need for sodium supplementation. The purpose of the case report is to present a rare complication associated with aminophylline use and to shed light on potential deleterious effects associated with drug shortages.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):259-261
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_1_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Bilateral infected cephalhaematoma-aggravated by massage

    • Authors: Anantsagar Motepalli, Manisha Ramanlal Patel, Venkateswararoa Malla
      Pages: 262 - 264
      Abstract: Anantsagar Motepalli, Manisha Ramanlal Patel, Venkateswararoa Malla
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):262-264
      Spontaneously infected cephalhematoma are rare occurrences. Although considered unharmful can lead to anemia, jaundice and infection. Untreated infected cephalhematoma may lead to osteomyelitis, sepsis and meningitis. We present a case of bilateral cephalhematoma, aggravated by massage (a so-called social custom) leading to spontaneous infection and severe anemia, requiring aspiration, and intravenous antibiotics.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):262-264
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_9_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • A case of neonatal graves' Disease in a premature infant with negative
           thyrotropin stimulating antibodies

    • Authors: Sylvia Robinson, Stelios Mantis, Carla Zanatta Minutti
      Pages: 265 - 267
      Abstract: Sylvia Robinson, Stelios Mantis, Carla Zanatta Minutti
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):265-267
      Neonatal hyperthyroidism is a disorder usually caused by the passage of maternal thyrotropin receptor antibodies. Thyrotropin receptor antibodies can be stimulatory, neutral, or inhibitory. We present a case of neonatal hyperthyroidism in a preterm infant born to a mother with Graves' disease that was thyrotropin receptor stimulating antibody negative. Thyrotropin receptor blocking antibody levels were elevated. Anti-thyroid medication could only be weaned once thyrotropin blocking antibody levels significantly declined. We presume the clinical symptoms of hyperthyroidism in the infant were secondary to the interaction of thyrotropin blocking antibodies with the TSH receptor.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):265-267
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_31_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Female megalourethra with imperforate anus: A rare presentation

    • Authors: Shalini Hegde, Monika Bawa
      Pages: 268 - 269
      Abstract: Shalini Hegde, Monika Bawa
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):268-269
      Congenital megalourethra is a rare form of functional obstructive uropathy caused by dysgenesis of the penile corpora cavernosa and spongiosa. Megalourethra is usually described in males and rarely seen in disorders of sexual differentiation. A neonate presented to us with ambiguous genitalia, a megalourethra and imperforate anus. Genetically, the baby was 46XX and the presence of mullerian structures was confirmed during laparotomy. Hormonal workup for congenital adrenal hyperplasia was negative. Although the functional obstruction of the urethra was circumvented by a suprapubic cystostomy, the status of the upper tracts ultimately decided the fate of the child. The presence of crossed fused ectopia with dysplasia and hydronephrosis led to multiple bouts of urosepsis and rapid renal failure. Evaluation of renal as well as other systemic abnormalities is essential for prognosis and planning of treatment.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):268-269
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_36_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Neonatal liver abscess with impending rupture presenting as abdominal wall
           swelling: A rare case

    • Authors: Aditya Pratap Singh, Arun Kumar Gupta, Maryem Ansari, Sunil Mehra Kumar
      Pages: 270 - 272
      Abstract: Aditya Pratap Singh, Arun Kumar Gupta, Maryem Ansari, Sunil Mehra Kumar
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):270-272
      Neonatal liver abscess is a rare entity, and till date, fewer than 100 cases have been reported in the literature. In general, they occur in preterm infants with certain risk factors like umbilical vein catheterization. Treatment consists of aspiration, drainage of the abscess with antibiotics. We are reporting here a case of the liver abscess with impending rupture in a 1-month-old male child.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):270-272
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_55_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Neonatal “resistance to thyroid hormone (refetoff syndrome)”
           with novel THRB mutation

    • Authors: Devaraj Sambalingam, Krishnaswamy Jyotsna Rao
      Pages: 273 - 275
      Abstract: Devaraj Sambalingam, Krishnaswamy Jyotsna Rao
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):273-275
      Context: Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is an inherited condition with variable target tissue hyposensitivity. We report two cases of preterm neonates with Neonatal resistance to thyroid hormone syndrome, one with a novel mutation in the “Thyroid hormone receptor – Beta (THRB) gene. Case description: Case 1: A male extremely preterm neonate born at 25 weeks and birth weight of 647 grams. The routine newborn screen raised concerns for hypothyroidism and further labs revealed persistently elevated TSH, free T4. The thyroid antibodies were not elevated. MRI brain did not show a pituitary tumor. The baby had persistent tachycardia and poor weight gain. The baby died eventually due to late onset sepsis as a complication of prematurity at 6 weeks of life. DNA sequence testing revealed that one of the copies had c.1299delC mutation in the THRB gene which is predicted to be pathogenic but not reported in literature. Case 2: A very preterm baby girl born at 30 weeks investigated for thyroid dysfunction due to persistent tachycardia and as mother had recently been diagnosed with resistance to thyroid hormone showed Heterozygous positive for p.PRO453THR mutation in THRB gene. Conclusion: This is the first case report of resistance to TH in extremely/very preterm newborn and one of them with novel mutation, suggesting tissue level differential functional thyroid status. Both these heterozygous mutations affect both THRB1 and THRB2 as exon 10 is necessary for both the protein isoforms. With TSH and T4 being elevated and persistent tachycardia, we think that these newborns had “Pituitary specific RTH”.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):273-275
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_75_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Twenty-four hours' Transcutaneous bilirubin as a predictor of
           subsequent 3rd day neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

    • Authors: Jogender Kumar
      Pages: 276 - 276
      Abstract: Jogender Kumar
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):276-276

      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2017 6(4):276-276
      PubDate: Tue,17 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_17_17
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 4 (2017)
       
 
 
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