for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 354 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Journal of Clinical Neonatology
  [1 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2249-4847
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [354 journals]
  • Impact of intrauterine growth restriction and birth weight on infant's
           early childhood neurodevelopment outcome

    • Authors: Fahad Al-Qashar, Badr Sobaih, Eman Shajira, Saif Al Saif, Ibrahim Abdelhakim Ahmed, Hassan Al-Shehri, Mosleh Jabari, Abdullah Al-Faris, Mohammed Al-Sayed, Loaysobaih, Kamal Ali
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Fahad Al-Qashar, Badr Sobaih, Eman Shajira, Saif Al Saif, Ibrahim Abdelhakim Ahmed, Hassan Al-Shehri, Mosleh Jabari, Abdullah Al-Faris, Mohammed Al-Sayed, Loaysobaih , Kamal Ali
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):1-6
      Background: Infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are at increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality in addition to long-term neurodevelopmental impairment due to fetal, placental, or maternal causes. Aim: This study aims to evaluate early childhood neurodevelopmental outcome from 18 to 24 months of age following a pregnancy complicated by IUGR. Study Design: This is an observational cohort study of prospectively collected data from a neonatal follow-up program (NFP) at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results: A total of 65 IUGR infants with a median gestational age (GA) of 36 weeks (28–40 weeks) and a median birth weight of 1595 g (740–2280 g) were enrolled in the NFP. The majority of the mothers were Saudi 63 (97%), with a mean age of 30 years (19–45 years). Sixty-five percent of the infants were born by cesarean section. The prevalence of IUGR was 5.5% with predominance of symmetrical IUGR pattern 52 (80%). The median age of developmental assessment was 15 months (7–33 months). Thirty-two infants (49.2%) had a lower score (moderate 23 (35.4%) and severe 9 (13.4%) by Bayley Infant Neurodevelopmental Screening (BINS). There were no correlations between BINS category and birth weight, GA, gender, or type of IUGR. Catch-up growth was achieved in 44 (66.7%) of the infants at a median age of 9 months. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a higher incidence of poor neurodevelopmental scores at the early ages from 15 to 24 months among infants who were born following a pregnancy complicated by IUGR. BINS scores were not influenced by birth weight, GA, gender, or type of IUGR. IUGR is an independent variable for poor neurodevelopmental outcome. These patients will be followed to preschool ages for further neurocognitive assessment.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):1-6
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_16_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • The effect of whole body cooling in asphyxiated neonates with resource
           limitation: Challenges and experience

    • Authors: Rahul Sinha, K Venkatnarayan, Vandana Negi, Kirandeep Sodhi, BM John
      Pages: 7 - 11
      Abstract: Rahul Sinha, K Venkatnarayan, Vandana Negi, Kirandeep Sodhi, BM John
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):7-11
      Background: Whole-body cooling is now recommended for the treatment neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) if started within 6 h of birth and continued for 72 h has shown to reduce the mortality and morbidity (1–4). The literature search also mentions the therapeutic beneficial effect of whole-body cooling in moderate-to-severe birth asphyxia. We publish the effect of whole-body cooling in asphyxiated neonates with resource limitation. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective interventional study of newborns admitted for HIE from October 2014 to April 2016 in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Military Hospital (Level 2). There were 1565 deliveries during this period and 65 neonates with perinatal asphyxia were admitted in the unit. They were divided into two group by computer generated number so that the selection bias was minimised. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were determined as per the predesigned proforma. According to inclusion criteria, thirty inborn cases were eligible for the study group. The other control group included thirty neonates who did not receive whole-body cooling and was given treatment as per standard protocol. The remaining five babies were not included in the study group as they had mild birth asphyxia. The ethical approval and written informed consent were taken before the intervention. Inclusion criteria - Neonates born beyond 36 weeks of gestation and weight more than 2000 Grams were included in the study. The other inclusion criteria were umbilical cord or a postnatal (in the 1st h of life) arterial blood gas pH of <7.0 or base deficit of more than or equal to 16 along with any two of the following: (1) Apgar score of <5 at 5 min; (2) positive pressure ventilation (PPV) initiated at birth and continued for at least 10 min; (3) risk factor (anyone) - intrapartum fetal distress, cord prolapse, placental abruption, and uterine rupture/dehiscence. Exclusion criteria - Neonates born before 36 weeks and reported after 6 h of birth were excluded from the study. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS 17. The difference between the two groups was studied either by the nonparametric Mann–Whitney test for quantitative variables or by Chi-square test or Fisher's test for qualitative variables. Statistical difference was considered significant if P < 0.05. Results: The primary outcome was measured in terms of neurological examination at 18 months of age and secondary outcome was measured in terms of adverse outcome and complications. The detail clinical examination and Denver Development Screening test were used for the neurological and developmental assessment. The neurological outcome at discharge and at 18 months of age was better in neonates given whole-body cooling than in the control group. The normal neurological outcome at 18 months of age was 70% compared to control group of 43% with P= 0.02. Furthermore, the cognitive delay at 18 months of age was lesser than control group.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):7-11
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_59_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Yakson touch and kinesthetic stimulation on development of high-risk
           neonates in neonatal intensive care units: A randomized controlled trial

    • Authors: Preeti Parashar, Asir John Samuel
      Pages: 12 - 19
      Abstract: Preeti Parashar, Asir John Samuel
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):12-19
      Background and Objectives: About 15 million babies are born preterm every year. Among them, almost 1 million neonates die due to complications. Even the survivors are prone to lifetime disability. Yakson touch and kinesthetic stimulation techniques have been proved to be effective in minimizing the complications and disability, but there is no standardized protocol. Hence, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of Yakson touch in combination with kinesthetic stimulation (YAKIN) on the development of high-risk neonates. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight neonates were recruited through parental consent from a recognized tertiary care teaching hospital for this two-group pre- and post-test design of randomized controlled trial and were allocated into control group (n = 14) and experimental group (n = 14) by block randomization method. Neonatal behavioral assessment scale (NBAS) was performed on all recruited neonates. The duration of intervention was 5 days out of 7 days. The experimental group received Yakson touch and kinesthetic stimulation and the control group received conventional handling which included developmental positioning and Kangaroo mother care. On the 7th day, NBAS was done again to document the effect of the intervention. Results: Neonates median gestational age of 35 (34, 35.3) weeks in experimental and 35 (33.5, 36) in control group were recruited. There were no significant differences between the groups (p> 0.05). Large effect size index was seen in the experimental group. Conclusions: Efficacy of the standardized protocol YAKIN has been verified, and it may have positive effects on the overall development of high-risk neonates.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):12-19
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_67_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Cardiovascular involvement in birth asphyxia

    • Authors: Vivek Singh, Rohit Vohra, Minakshi Bansal
      Pages: 20 - 24
      Abstract: Vivek Singh, Rohit Vohra, Minakshi Bansal
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):20-24
      Background: Asphyxia before, during, or after birth is an important cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity. The newborn infant who does not breathe at birth suffers from oxygen lack, carbon dioxide excess, and fall in blood pH. Although the fetal and neonatal myocardium seems to be resistant to hypoxia, heart failure is commonly seen after perinatal asphyxia. We performed this study to determine the incidence of cardiovascular insult in birth asphyxia. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective, observational, hospital-based study carried out on 152 asphyxiated neonates admitted in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Rural Medical College of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, Loni, Ahmednagar, Maharashtra, from September 2013 to August 2015. Results: Cardiovascular involvement was seen in 48 (32%) of the infants who had birth asphyxia. Cardiovascular dysfunction most commonly manifested by the use of inotropes (32%) followed by abnormal echocardiography (27%), electrocardiography (ECG) changes (13%), and elevated creatinine kinase-MB (14.5%). Out of the 48 neonates who had cardiovascular system (CVS) dysfunction, 28 children survived till hospital discharge. Conclusions: CVS dysfunction is present in significant proportion of neonates following asphyxia injury and neonates with cardiovascular dysfunction have a poor outcome.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):20-24
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_80_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Effect of topical application of human breast milk versus 4%
           chlorhexidine versus dry cord care on bacterial colonization and clinical
           outcomes of umbilical cord in preterm newborns

    • Authors: Daiahunlin Lyngdoh, Sukhjit Kaur, Praveen Kumar, Vikas Gautam, Sandhya Ghai
      Pages: 25 - 30
      Abstract: Daiahunlin Lyngdoh, Sukhjit Kaur, Praveen Kumar, Vikas Gautam, Sandhya Ghai
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):25-30
      Introduction: The umbilical cord is one of the routes of entry of microorganisms that can cause infection. Hence, affordable, effective, and safe cord care regimens are needed to prevent from such infections. Methods: The study was conducted in Nehru Hospital, PGIMER, Chandigarh, with the objective to assess the effect of two cord care regimens – human breast milk and 4% chlorhexidine on bacterial colonization and other clinical outcomes. A total of 105 newborns were enrolled and randomized into three groups (35 participants in each group) – human breast milk, 4% chlorhexidine, and dry cord care group (control group). The umbilical cord swab baseline sample was taken and cultured from each of the participants. The first application (either breast milk or 4% chlorhexidine) was done immediately after the baseline cord swab sample was taken. In the dry cord care group (control group), nothing was applied on the cord. Cord swab was again taken at 72 ± 12 h and at 120 ± 12 h after birth. Umbilical cord separation time was noted. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in cord colonization at baseline (P = 0.13). At 72 ± 12 h, 34.3%, 5.7%, and 51.4% had colonization in the breast milk, chlorhexidine, and dry cord care, respectively (P < 0.001). At 120 ± 12 h, 22.9% had bacterial colonization in the breast milk group, 71.4% in the dry cord care group whereas only 2.9% in the chlorhexidine group (P < 0.001). The timing of cord separation was 9.09 ± 2.4 days, 12.65 ± 2.9 days, and 10.54 ± 3.1 days in the breast milk, chlorhexidine, and dry cord care, respectively, with maximum separation time with chlorhexidine application and least time taken in the breast milk group (P < 0.001). The main microorganisms detected were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Streptococcus. Conclusion: It is concluded that 4% chlorhexidine is very effective in reducing pathogenic bacteria colonization of the cord. Further, human breast milk, to some extent, can reduce bacterial colonization in low-resource settings and is a better alternative to dry cord care.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):25-30
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_91_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Prevalence of and risk factors for fetal malnutrition in term babies
           delivered at a Tertiary Hospital in Southern Nigeria

    • Authors: Appollus Ebenezer Josiah, Peace Ibo Opara, Alice Romokere Nte
      Pages: 31 - 37
      Abstract: Appollus Ebenezer Josiah, Peace Ibo Opara, Alice Romokere Nte
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):31-37
      Introduction: Fetal malnutrition (FM) is a “clinical state of a baby of any birth weight, characterized by obvious intrauterine loss or failure to acquire normal amounts of subcutaneous fat and muscle mass, manifesting as wasting, shortfalls in weight, length and other anthropometric measurements.” It is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the newborn. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors associated with FM in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective hospital-based study, carried out at the labor Wards of a tertiary hospital in Southern Nigeria. Baby-mother pairs who met the inclusion criteria for the study were recruited consecutively. Relevant biodata was recorded, and babies' nutritional status was assessed using the Clinical Assessment of Nutritional Status Score chart. Data were entered into a Microsoft Excel sheet and analyzed using standard statistical tools. Results: Of 300 newborns studied, 176 (58.7%) were male and 124 (41.3%) females with a male:female ratio of 1.4:1. The prevalence of FM was (16.7%). Babies with FM had significantly lower anthropometric indices (length, occipitofrontal circumference, and mid-upper arm circumference) than their counterparts (P = 0.00). Being small for gestational age and nonuse of at least one dose of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy were significantly associated with the occurrence of FM (P < 0.005). Conclusion: The prevalence of FM in Port Harcourt is high and highlights the need for evolving appropriate interventions and strategies for its prevention.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):31-37
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_98_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Is phototherapy stressful? A study to compare the stress of neonates in
           single and double-surface phototherapy

    • Authors: Varghese Abraham, Elizabeth Johnson, Khristina Deep, Deepanjali Dip, Pratima Yadav, Mahima Singh
      Pages: 38 - 40
      Abstract: Varghese Abraham, Elizabeth Johnson, Khristina Deep, Deepanjali Dip, Pratima Yadav, Mahima Singh
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):38-40
      Objectives: The aim of this study is to compare the stress level of neonate undergoing double-surface (DS) and single-surface (SS) phototherapy. Study Design: This was a prospective observational study. Study Setting: Neonates with indirect hyperbilirubinemia on phototherapy in Special Newborn Care Unit of Christian Hospital, Chhatarpur, Madhya Pradesh, India (A Unit of Emmanuel Hospital Association, New Delhi). Materials and Methods: The stress level of neonate under DS and SS phototherapy was assessed with COMFORT-B scale. The neonate was assessed before the start of phototherapy (zero hours) and was further assessed at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h of phototherapy. Results: A total of 94 neonates were included in the study, of which 56 (59.5%) are term and 38 (40.5%) are preterm. The maximum COMFORT-B scale score was 23, and the minimum score was 7. The mean COMFORT-B score was marginally higher with DS phototherapy at all hours of phototherapy, but it is not statistically significant. Similar observations were noted among terms and preterms. Conclusion: There is no additional stress to neonates in DS phototherapy compared to SS phototherapy.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):38-40
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_108_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Sacrococcygeal teratoma with organoid lung differentiation: A rare entity

    • Authors: Mamta Jain, Rajeev Saxena, Sangeeta Saxena, Sanjay Jain
      Pages: 41 - 43
      Abstract: Mamta Jain, Rajeev Saxena, Sangeeta Saxena, Sanjay Jain
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):41-43
      Teratoma is a tumor that is derived from three germ cell layers, and it occurs commonly in the ovary and sacrococcygeal region. In the present study, we report a rare case of sacrococcygeal teratoma of newborn showing features of organoid lung differentiation. A 2-day-old girl child presented with left gluteal mass. Surgical excision was done, and histopathology revealed mature sacrococcygeal teratoma with adult type organoid lung differentiation which is a very rare finding.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):41-43
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_89_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Perineal fistula associated with jejunal atresia- A diagnostic dilemma

    • Authors: Kanoujia Sunil, Ajay Kumar Verma, Anand Pandey, Archika Gupta
      Pages: 44 - 45
      Abstract: Kanoujia Sunil, Ajay Kumar Verma, Anand Pandey, Archika Gupta
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):44-45
      Anorectal malformation (ARM) is a common congenital anomaly with diverse clinical presentations. It may be associated with other congenital anomalies. We operated a patient of ARM who was diagnosed to be high type of ARM. Intra-operatively, it was found to be a case of perineal fistula with jejunal atresia. Being an extremely rare presentation, it is being presented with review of relevant literature.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):44-45
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_102_16
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Type IV terminal ileal atresia with undiagnosed mid-ileal duplication
           cyst: A very rare case

    • Authors: Digamber Chaubey, Sudhir Singh, JD Rawat, Gurmeet Singh
      Pages: 46 - 47
      Abstract: Digamber Chaubey, Sudhir Singh, JD Rawat, Gurmeet Singh
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):46-47
      A case of multiple terminal ileal atresia with associated undiagnosed duplication of mid-ileum found intraoperatively is reported here.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):46-47
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_46_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Acute hemoglobin increase after transfusion and immunoglobulin for rhesus
           hemolytic disease of the newborn

    • Authors: Goronwy Owen Hughes, Joseph Osman, Anne Marie Coady, Hilary Klonin
      Pages: 48 - 50
      Abstract: Goronwy Owen Hughes, Joseph Osman, Anne Marie Coady, Hilary Klonin
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):48-50
      We describe two infants with severe hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) with hepatosplenomegaly treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Packed red blood cells (PRBC) were transfused resulting in an acute disproportionate increase in hemoglobin with clinical consequences in one case. These cases appear to highlight previously unreported sequelae. We discuss a hypothetical mechanism and suggest that the effect warrants further research as a possible way to decrease the need for and risks of PRBC transfusion in HDFN.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):48-50
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_48_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A rare case of acute venolymphatic insufficiency in a neonate

    • Authors: Jos&#233; Maria Pereira De Godoy
      Pages: 51 - 53
      Abstract: José Maria Pereira De Godoy
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):51-53
      We report a neonate with acute venolymphatic insufficiency after an endovascular procedure. The case of a newborn baby, who evolved with phlegmasia cerulea dolens, one type of acute venolymphatic insufficiency, after a venous endovascular procedure, is reported. Soon after the procedure, the child evolved with cyanosis that led to phlegmasia cerulea dolens following reperfusion of the limb. Lymphovenous drainage of the deep and superficial systems was performed that resulted in recovery of the limb. The drainage was performed for the periods of 20 min/h. The child required analgesic sedation to reduce movement of the limb, thereby diminishing blood flow. After 15 days, the patient no longer required analgesic sedation or lymph drainage.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):51-53
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_71_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Vascular ring and ventricular septal defect in a premature baby with
           smith–magenis syndrome

    • Authors: Anutosh Shee, Joyce Nayan-Cruz
      Pages: 54 - 58
      Abstract: Anutosh Shee, Joyce Nayan-Cruz
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):54-58
      Clinical detection of genetic disorders in early neonatal period is often difficult, particularly in the context of difficulty in recognizing subtle facial dysmorphism in prematurity. As the newer technology such as phenotype-based whole-exome sequencing is gaining popularity as the most effective and reliable way of early diagnosis more emphasis will be returned back to identify typical and uncommon phenotypical features of genetic disorders. Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a sporadic genetic disorder caused by 17p11.2 microdeletion in 90% of cases with wide variety of features ranging from intellectual disability, distinctive facial appearance, significant circadian sleep rhythm abnormality, congenital heart disease (CHD) (30%), brain and renal malformation to obvious behavioral problems, most of which, however, are appreciable only at late childhood. Currently, SMS is diagnosed by single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray. Earlier diagnosis for this sporadic condition depends on high index of suspicion, particularly for those who are missed during the fetal morphology scan. CHD can be a very important clue in the fetal or early neonatal period. In this article, we present a preterm infant with SMS in association with ventricular septal defect and vascular ring, a combination of which was not reported earlier. Notification of these atypical features is an important element of increasing the knowledge base in the process of the earlier diagnosis in future.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):54-58
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_72_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Decoding of tyrosinase leads to albinism in a nonidentical twin

    • Authors: Rajendran Kadarkarai Raj, Prakadeeswari Gopalakrishnan, Vijayalakshmi Perumalsamy, Periasamy Sundaresan
      Pages: 59 - 62
      Abstract: Rajendran Kadarkarai Raj, Prakadeeswari Gopalakrishnan, Vijayalakshmi Perumalsamy, Periasamy Sundaresan
      Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):59-62
      Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder, phenotypically subcategorized as OCA subtype 1A (OCA-1A) and OCA subtype 1B (OCA-1B). Both the subtypes are genetically caused by the mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. A 6-month-old nonidentical twin sister was albino who was diagnosed with OCA-1A and had clinical features including hypopigmentation in iris, lid, lashes, skin, nystagmus, and albinotic fundus. Genetic screening revealed the pathogenic mutation at TYR gene locus in albino child, whereas the other child was carrier and holding normal phenotype. We report a differential TYR expression pattern on one of the nonidentical twins.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Neonatology 2018 7(1):59-62
      PubDate: Tue,6 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcn.JCN_84_17
      Issue No: Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.167.75.28
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-