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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 425 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 425 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research KLEU     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Acute Disease     Open Access   (SJR: 0.163, CiteScore: 1)

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Indian Journal of Medical Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.656
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0971-5916
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [425 journals]
  • Patient safety & universal health coverage in India

    • Authors: Chandrakant Lahariya, Lav Agarwal, Hilde de Graeve, Henk Bekedam
      Pages: 211 - 213
      Abstract: Chandrakant Lahariya, Lav Agarwal, Hilde de Graeve, Henk Bekedam
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):211-213

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):211-213
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1658_19
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Ki-67, an elusive marker in the prognosis of breast cancer

    • Authors: Neelam Sood
      Pages: 214 - 216
      Abstract: Neelam Sood
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):214-216

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):214-216
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_827_19
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Influenza pandemic preparedness: A special challenge for India

    • Authors: David S Fedson
      Pages: 217 - 220
      Abstract: David S Fedson
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):217-220

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):217-220
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_2034_18
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Anti-thymocyte globulin in haematology: Recent developments

    • Authors: Salahuddin Siddiqui, Jessica Cox, Roger Herzig, Senthilnathan Palaniyandi, Gerhard C Hildebrandt, Reinhold Munker
      Pages: 221 - 227
      Abstract: Salahuddin Siddiqui, Jessica Cox, Roger Herzig, Senthilnathan Palaniyandi, Gerhard C Hildebrandt, Reinhold Munker
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):221-227
      Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) is a polyclonal antiserum introduced into clinical medicine more than 30 years ago. It induces a broad non-specific immunosuppression. In haematology, standard indications are severe aplastic anaemia and prophylaxis and treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (after allogeneic transplantation). For aplastic anaemia, ATG from horses has been found to be superior to ATG from rabbits. In the situation of allogeneic transplantation, ATG lessens the risk of chronic GVHD but may not improve survival. There is current controversy regarding which patients benefit most from ATG and what the ideal dosage is. It is likely that in the coming years a more specific immunosuppressive will be developed that will minimize GVHD while maintaining the graft-versus-malignancy effect.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):221-227
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_752_19
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Illicit drugs: Effects on eye

    • Authors: Deepika Dhingra, Savleen Kaur, Jagat Ram
      Pages: 228 - 238
      Abstract: Deepika Dhingra, Savleen Kaur, Jagat Ram
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):228-238
      There is a myriad of changes that can be produced in the eye by toxic drugs ranging from mild/no symptoms to severe loss of vision from endophthalmitis. The routes of administration include oral ingestion, smoking, nasal inhalation, intravenous injection, topical application or application to other mucosal surfaces. It is important to recognize certain clinical signs and symptoms in the eye produced by these toxins. This article describes in brief some of the ocular effects of commonly abused drugs. For identification of a particular poisoning, in addition to the clinical presentation, pulse, blood pressure, respiration and body temperature, pupillary size, pupillary reaction to light, ocular convergence and nystagmus can be useful indicators of the type of drug the patient is exposed to. Unmasking these features help the clinician in an early and accurate diagnosis of the offending drug as well as timely management.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):228-238
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1210_17
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • National Iron Plus Initiative: Current status & future strategy

    • Authors: Umesh Kapil, Radhika Kapil, Aakriti Gupta
      Pages: 239 - 247
      Abstract: Umesh Kapil, Radhika Kapil, Aakriti Gupta
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):239-247
      Anaemia is a severe public health problem amongst all vulnerable age groups in India. The National Nutritional Anaemia Prophylaxis Programme initiated in 1970, was revised and expanded to include beneficiaries from all age groups namely children aged 6-59 months, 5-10 yr, adolescents aged 10-19 yr, pregnant and lactating women and women in reproductive age group under the National Iron Plus Initiative (NIPI) programme in 2011. The dose of iron, frequency and duration of iron supplementation and roles and responsibilities of the functionaries were described. At present, the coverage of beneficiaries with iron and folic acid has been poor at the national level. The prevalence of anaemia has continued to remain high during the last 60 years, and there has been no significant change in the scenario due to various reasons. The constraints in implementation and measures to improve the NIPI programme are discussed in the current article.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):239-247
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1782_18
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • The grand challenge of regulating health foods in India

    • Authors: Sesikeran Boindala, Joseph I Lewis
      Pages: 248 - 253
      Abstract: Sesikeran Boindala, Joseph I Lewis
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):248-253
      Food is the primary source of nutrients to keep us nourished and healthy. Poor and unhealthy diets implicated with the increase of several non-communicable diseases (NCDs) require a food-based approach to reduce the ongoing rise. Traditional knowledge and science behind food-related health benefits became evident in the last three decades. Active ingredients, bioactive molecules and conventionally used herbs were clinically researched and proven to have beneficial outcomes. In the Indian scenario, the multiplicity of food products, including medicinal type formats, such as health supplements, containing plant, herbs or novel ingredients, brings in a new complexity to regulations. Several of these ingredients are pharmacologically active substances and could overlap with drug regulations. The data generated on the nutritional and health benefit of a supplement should be reproducible, outcomes measurable and disease risk reduction shown by well-designed research studies. Regulatory challenges occur at several levels, namely, harmonization of law, fair trade practice, population exposures to chemicals and contaminants, food borne illness, rise in NCD's, novel ingredients, new technologies and a legacy of regulatory practice. While regulatory and legal challenges will always exist, reliance on the role of scientific research in the regulatory context becomes significant.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):248-253
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1719_18
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Diagnostic ability of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction
           versus immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 assessment in breast cancer: An
           Indian perspective

    • Authors: Anurag Mehta, Dushyant Kumar, Prerna Chadha, Malini Goswami, Gayatri Vishwakarma, Manoj Panigrahi, Moushumi Suryavanshi, Ajit Panaych
      Pages: 254 - 260
      Abstract: Anurag Mehta, Dushyant Kumar, Prerna Chadha, Malini Goswami, Gayatri Vishwakarma, Manoj Panigrahi, Moushumi Suryavanshi, Ajit Panaych
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):254-260
      Background & objectives: Breast cancer is the most common cancer of women. Inferior prognosis in some patients has been attributed to the higher proliferative capability of the tumour. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for Ki-67, despite being a simple and cost-effective method, has not become a valid tool to evaluate this biomarker. This is ascribed to variation in pre-analytical and analytical techniques, variable expression, hotspot distribution and inter-and intra-observer inconsistency. This study was aimed at defining the analytical and clinical validity of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) as an alternative to IHC evaluation.Methods: This study included a total of 109 patients with invasive breast cancers. Ki-67 IHC visual assessment was compared with the mRNA value determined by RT-qPCR. Concordance between both the methods was assessed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and Cohen's kappa value with intraclass correlation were performed.Results: The threshold value for Ki-67 by RT-qPCR obtained by ROC curve was 22.23 per cent, which was used to divide breast cancer cases into high proliferative and low proliferative groups. A significant correlation was observed between both the breast cancer groups formed using RT-qPCR threshold as well as median laboratory value of Ki-67 labelling index by IHC.Interpretation & conclusions: The study results showed a significant correlation between the two methods. While IHC is subject to technical and interpretative variability, RT-qPCR may offer a more objective alternative.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):254-260
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_644_18
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Pharmacogenetic analyses of variations of measures of cardiovascular risk
           in Alzheimer's dementia

    • Authors: Fabricio Ferreira de Oliveira, Juliana Marília Berretta, Guido Veiga de Almeida Junior, Sandro Soares de Almeida, Elizabeth Suchi Chen, Marilia Cardoso Smith, Paulo Henrique Ferreira Bertolucci
      Pages: 261 - 271
      Abstract: Fabricio Ferreira de Oliveira, Juliana Marília Berretta, Guido Veiga de Almeida Junior, Sandro Soares de Almeida, Elizabeth Suchi Chen, Marilia Cardoso Smith, Paulo Henrique Ferreira Bertolucci
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):261-271
      Background & objectives: Neurodegeneration affects blood pressure variations, while renal function and cerebral perfusion are impaired by vascular risk factors. This study was aimed to estimate variations of measures of cardiovascular risk in Alzheimer's dementia by pharmacogenetic analyses of the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and statins.Methods: Consecutive patients were prospectively followed to study variations of creatinine clearance and blood pressure for one year, estimated by correlating the effects of ACE inhibitors with the ACE Alu I/D polymorphism and genotypes or haplotypes of rs1800764 or rs4291, and the effects of statins with LDLR (low-density lipoprotein receptor) genotypes or haplotypes of rs11669576 (exon 8) or rs5930 (exon 10), or genotypes of rs2695121 (liver X receptor β gene). Variations of the coronary heart disease (CHD) risk according to these cardiovascular measures were also explored.Results: All polymorphisms of the 193 patients were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Genetic determinants of cardiovascular effects affected the individual variability of the response to ACE inhibitors and statins. ACE inhibitors, but not statins, reduced blood pressure for all patients. ACE inhibitors protected carriers of alleles that supposedly decrease serum ACE levels (rs1800764-T, rs4291-A, Alu II) regarding creatinine clearance variations (P <0.005), but carriers of Alu DD (P <0.02), rs1800764-C (P <0.05), or rs4291-AT (P <0.04) showed better blood pressure lowering effects. The presence of rs2695121-T (P=0.007) or rs5930-A (P=0.039) was associated with systolic blood pressure lowering, whereas rs5930-AA was protective against decrease in creatinine clearance (P=0.019). Statins lowered creatinine clearance for carriers of rs2695121-CT (P=0.026). Interpretation & conclusions: Pharmacological response of blood pressure and creatinine clearance to ACE inhibitors and statins may be genetically mediated.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):261-271
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1209_17
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Haplotype analysis of ADAM33 polymorphisms in asthma: A pilot study

    • Authors: Sangeetha Vishweswaraiah, Nallur B Ramachandra, BS Jayaraj, Amrutha D Holla, Samarpana Chakraborty, Anurag Agrawal, Padukudru A Mahesh
      Pages: 272 - 281
      Abstract: Sangeetha Vishweswaraiah, Nallur B Ramachandra, BS Jayaraj, Amrutha D Holla, Samarpana Chakraborty, Anurag Agrawal, Padukudru A Mahesh
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):272-281
      Background & objectives: ADAM33 is implicated as a potentially strong candidate gene for asthma and bronchial hyper-responsiveness. Many polymorphisms of ADAM33 have been studied along with ADAM33 expression in various cells of the lungs. Haplotype analysis also showed association with asthma in different populations across the world. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive screening of ADAM33 polymorphisms in adult patients with asthma.Methods: Thirty five polymorphisms of ADAM33 were genotyped in 55 patients with asthma and 53 controls. The association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes with phenotypes of asthma was analysed.Results: The genotype, minor allele frequency, odds ratio and Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium did not show any significant difference among cases and controls. No association was found between SNPs of ADAM33 with the severity of asthma. Correlation analysis of ADAM33 SNPs to the phenotypes, based on clinical variables and allergen sensitization, did not show significant difference. Haplotype analysis showed that rs2280090 and rs2280091 were associated with asthma in the patient group. Interpretation & conclusions: Haplotype analysis showed an association of the two SNP variations with asthma. These SNPs lead to amino acid change and are prone to phosphorylation, which may affect expression levels and protein function of ADAM33 and asthma susceptibility.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):272-281
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_698_17
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Targeted sequencing of the DMD locus: A comprehensive diagnostic tool for
           all mutations

    • Authors: Sankaramoorthy Aravind, Berty Ashley, Ashraf Mannan, Aparna Ganapathy, Keerthi Ramesh, Aparna Ramachandran, Upendra Nongthomba, Arun Shastry
      Pages: 282 - 289
      Abstract: Sankaramoorthy Aravind, Berty Ashley, Ashraf Mannan, Aparna Ganapathy, Keerthi Ramesh, Aparna Ramachandran, Upendra Nongthomba, Arun Shastry
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):282-289
      Background & objectives: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder and is caused mainly by deletion, duplication and point mutations in the DMD gene. Diagnosis of DMD has been a challenge as the mutations in the DMD gene are heterogeneous and require more than one diagnostic strategy for the validation of the mutation. This study was planned to evaluate the targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) as a single platform to detect all types of mutations in the DMD gene, thereby reducing the time and costs compared to conventional sequential testing and also provide precise genetic information for emerging gene therapies.Methods: The study included 20 unrelated families and 22 patients from an Indian population who were screened for DMD based on phenotypes such as scoliosis, toe walking and loss of ambulation. Peripheral blood DNA was isolated and subjected to multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and targeted NGS of the DMD gene to identify the nature of the mutation.Results: In the study patients, 77 per cent of large deletion mutations and 23 per cent single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) were identified. Novel mutations were also identified along with reported deletions, point mutations and partial deletions within the exon of the DMD gene.Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed the importance of NGS in the routine diagnostic practice in the identification of DMD mutations over sequential testing. It may be used as a single-point diagnostic strategy irrespective of the mutation type, thereby reducing the turnaround time and cost for multiple diagnostic tests such as MLPA and Sanger sequencing. Though MLPA is a sensitive technique and is the first line of a diagnostic test, the targeted NGS of the DMD gene may have an advantage of having a single diagnostic test. A study on a larger number of patients is needed to highlight NGS as a single, comprehensive platform for the diagnosis of DMD.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):282-289
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_290_18
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • DNA damage induced by exposure to pesticides in children of rural areas in
           Paraguay

    • Authors: Stela Benitez Leite, Deidamia Mercedes Franco de Diana, Jaime Alfredo Segovia Abreu, Domingo Santiago Avalos, Marta Almada Denis, Cristina Coronel Ovelar, Mar&#237;a Jos&#233; Samaniego Royg, Boris Alexei Thielmann Arbo, Ram&#243;n Corvalan
      Pages: 290 - 296
      Abstract: Stela Benitez Leite, Deidamia Mercedes Franco de Diana, Jaime Alfredo Segovia Abreu, Domingo Santiago Avalos, Marta Almada Denis, Cristina Coronel Ovelar, María José Samaniego Royg, Boris Alexei Thielmann Arbo, Ramón Corvalan
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):290-296
      Background & objectives: Chronic exposure to pesticides can damage DNA and lead to cancer, diabetes, respiratory diseases and neurodegenerative and neurodevelopment disorders. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of DNA damage through the comet assay and micronucleus (MN) test in two groups of children, under 10 yr of age living in rural Paraguay and in relation to pesticide exposure.Methods: Two groups of 5 to 10 yr old children were formed; the exposed group (group A, n=43), born and currently living in a community dedicated to family agriculture and surrounded by transgenic soybean crops, and the control group (group B, n=41), born and living in a community dedicated to family agriculture with biological control of pests. For each child, 2000 cells were studied for the MN test and 200 cells for the comet assay.Results: The comparison between exposed and control children revealed significant differences in biomarkers studied for the measurement of genetic damage (cell death and DNA damage). The median of MN was higher in the exposed group (6 vs. 1) (P <0.001). Binucleated cells (2.9 vs. 0.5, P <0.001); broken eggs (5.5 vs. 1.0, P <0.001); karyorrhexis (6.7 vs. 0.5, P <0.001); kariolysis (14.0 vs. 1.0, P <0.001); pyknosis (7.4 vs. 1.2, P <0.001) and condensed chromatin (25.5 vs. 7.0, P <0.001) were significantly higher in the exposed group. The values of tail length (59.1 vs 37.2 μm); tail moment (TM) (32.8 vs. 14.4 μm); TM olive (15.5 vs. 6); % DNA tail (45.2 vs. 27.6) and % DNA head (54.8 vs. 72.4), were significantly different between the two groups.Interpretations & conclusions: In children exposed to pesticides, a greater genotoxic and cytotoxic effect was observed compared to non-exposed children. Our findings suggest that monitoring of genetic toxicity in population exposed to pesticides and agrochemicals should be done.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):290-296
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1497_17
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Development & cross-validation of anthropometric predictive models to
           estimate the appendicular skeletal muscle mass in middle-aged women in Sri
           Lanka

    • Authors: Nirmala Rathnayake, Gayani Alwis, Janaka Lenora, Sarath Lekamwasam
      Pages: 297 - 305
      Abstract: Nirmala Rathnayake, Gayani Alwis, Janaka Lenora, Sarath Lekamwasam
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):297-305
      Background & objectives: Attempts have been made to estimate appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASMM) using anthropometric indices and most of these are country specific. This study was designed to develop and cross-validate simple predictive models to estimate the ASMM based on anthropometry in a group of healthy middle-aged women in Sri Lanka.Methods: The study was conducted on a randomly selected group of community-dwelling women aged 30-60 years. ASMM (kg) quantified with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (ASMMDXA) was used as the reference standard. Anthropometric measurements such as body weight (kg), height (m), limb circumferences (cm) and skinfold thickness (mm) which showed significant correlations with ASMMDXA, were used to develop the models. The models were developed using a group of 165 women (aged 30-60 yr) and were cross-validated using a separate sample of women (n=167) (mean age: 48.9±8.56 yr), selected randomly.Results: Nine anthropometry-based models were developed using weight, height, skinfold thicknesses, circumferences, body mass index, menopausal status (MS) and age as independent variables. Four models which were based on height, weight, triceps skinfold thickness (TSFT), age and MS met all the validation criteria with high correlations (ranged 0.89-0.92) and high predictive values explaining high variance (80-84%) with low standard error of estimate (1.10-1.24 kg). Interpretation & conclusions: The four models (ASMM 1-ASMM 4) developed based on height, weight, TSFT, age and MS showed a high accuracy in estimating the ASMM in middle-aged women.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):297-305
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1961_17
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Detection of respiratory syncytial virus & Mycoplasma pneumoniae in
           paediatric lower respiratory tract infections

    • Authors: Sanchit Kumar, Anita Chakravarti, Surinder Kumar, Seema Kapoor
      Pages: 306 - 309
      Abstract: Sanchit Kumar, Anita Chakravarti, Surinder Kumar, Seema Kapoor
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):306-309
      Background & objectives: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae are considered common cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in children. The present study was conducted to detect M. pneumoniae and RSV in paediatric LRTIs employing serology, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analysis.Methods: Seventy five children aged one month to five years with acute LRTIs were investigated for M. pneumoniae antibodies and RSV antigen using immunochromatographic test, RT-PCR for RSV and M. pneumoniae by PCR on nasopharyngeal aspirates. Results: RSV infection was observed in 33 (44%) and M. pneumoniae was positive in 26 (35%) children. No significant difference in infection was noted between male and female children. Clinical and radiological features among RSV and M. pneumoniae positive and negative cases were similar. Considering RT-PCR for RSV as gold standard, RSV antigen immunochromatography was 90.90 per cent sensitive and 100 per cent specific.Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed the presence of RSV and M. pneumoniae infection in 44 and 35 per cent children, respectively with community-acquired LRTIs and aged less than five years.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):306-309
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_983_18
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as shoulder swelling

    • Authors: YS Sarma, M Sriharibabu
      Pages: 310 - 311
      Abstract: YS Sarma, M Sriharibabu
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):310-311

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):310-311
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_802_18
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Regional cardiac tamponade

    • Authors: Arun Gopalakrishnan, Vivek V Pillai
      Pages: 312 - 312
      Abstract: Arun Gopalakrishnan, Vivek V Pillai
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):312-312

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):312-312
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1851_17
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • The ovary

    • Authors: Reva Tripathi
      Pages: 313 - 313
      Abstract: Reva Tripathi
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):313-313

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):313-313
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1052_19
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
  • Erratum: Nutrition rehabilitation of children with severe acute
           malnutrition: Revisiting studies undertaken by the National Institute of
           Nutrition

    • Pages: 314 - 314
      Abstract:
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):314-314

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2019 150(3):314-314
      PubDate: Fri,8 Nov 2019
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-5916.270632
      Issue No: Vol. 150, No. 3 (2019)
       
 
 
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