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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 429 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 429 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access  
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.127, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access  
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)

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Journal Cover
Journal of Clinical Imaging Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.281
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2156-7514 - ISSN (Online) 2156-5597
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [429 journals]
  • 22q11 Deletion Syndrome with Vascular Anomalies

    • Authors: Pierre Maldjian, Alison Esteva Sanders
      Pages: 1 - 1
      Abstract: Pierre Maldjian, Alison Esteva Sanders
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):1-1
      DiGeorge syndrome, also termed 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, represents a spectrum of disorders that include thymic aplasia/hypoplasia, parathyroid aplasia/hypoplasia, conotruncal vascular anomalies, and velocardiofacial (Shprintzen) syndrome. This case report describes a novel constellation of cardiovascular anomalies in a 31-year-old patient with 22q11.2 deletion confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization at the age of 24. CT angiogram of the thorax revealed a right aortic arch with mirror image branching and unilateral absence of the left pulmonary artery with collateral flow through left intercostal arteries and hypertrophied left bronchial artery. This particular cluster of vascular findings has not been previously described in the imaging literature in a patient with known 22q11.2 deletion.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):1-1
      PubDate: Mon,22 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_66_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Assessment of the Agreement between Cerebral Hemodynamic Indices
           Quantified Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast and Dynamic
           Contrast-enhanced Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imagings

    • Authors: Seyed Salman Zakariaee, Mohammad Ali Oghabian, Kavous Firouznia, Guive Sharifi, Farshid Arbabi, Farhad Samiei
      Pages: 2 - 2
      Abstract: Seyed Salman Zakariaee, Mohammad Ali Oghabian, Kavous Firouznia, Guive Sharifi, Farshid Arbabi, Farhad Samiei
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):2-2
      Background: Brain tumor is one of the most common tumors. A successful treatment might be achieved with an early identification. Pathological investigation as the gold standard method for tumor identification has some limitations. Noninvasive assessment of tumor specifications may be possible using perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) could be calculated based on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in addition to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) modality. Each category of the cerebral hemodynamic and permeability indices revealed the specific tumor characteristics and their collection could help for better identification of the tumor. Some mathematical methods were developed to determine both cerebral hemodynamic and permeability indices based on a single-dose DCE perfusion MRI. There are only a few studies available on the comparison of DSC- and DCE-derived cerebral hemodynamic indices such as CBF and CBV. Aim: The objective of the study was to validate first-pass perfusion parameters derived from T1-based DCE method in comparison to the routine T2*-based DSC protocol. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients with brain tumor underwent DCE- and DSC-MRIs to evaluate the agreement between DSC- and DCE-derived cerebral hemodynamic parameters. Agreement between DSC- and DCE-derived cerebral hemodynamic indices was determined using the statistical method described by Bland and Altman. The reliability between DSC- and DCE-derived cerebral hemodynamic indices was measured using the intraclass correlation analysis. Results: The achieved magnitudes for DCE-derived CBV (gray matter [GM]: 5.01 ± 1.40 mL/100 g vs. white matter [WM]: 1.84 ± 0.74 mL/100 g) and DCE-derived CBF (GM: 60.53 ± 12.70 mL/100 g/min vs. WM: 32.00 ± 6.00 mL/100 g/min) were in good agreement with other studies. The intraclass correlation coefficients showed that the cerebral hemodynamic indices could accurately be estimated based on the DCE-MRI using a single-compartment model (>0.87), and DCE-derived cerebral hemodynamic indices are significantly similar to the magnitudes achieved based on the DSC-MRI (P < 0.001). Furthermore, an acceptable agreement was observed between DSC- and DCE-derived cerebral hemodynamic indices. Conclusion: Based on the measurement of the cerebral hemodynamic and blood–brain barrier permeability using DCE-MRI, a more comprehensive collection of the physiological parameters cloud be achieved for tumor evaluations.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):2-2
      PubDate: Mon,22 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_74_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Plexiform Neurofibroma in the Axilla with Intraosseous Neurofibroma in the
           Humerus in Neurofibromatosis 5

    • Authors: Sanjay Mhalasakant Khaladkar, Surbhi Chauhan, Raghav Kalra, Shishir Chauhan
      Pages: 3 - 3
      Abstract: Sanjay Mhalasakant Khaladkar, Surbhi Chauhan, Raghav Kalra, Shishir Chauhan
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):3-3
      Segmental neurofibromatosis type 5 (NF5) is a rare form of NF, in which the cutaneous and/or neural changes are confined to one region of the body. It is often underdiagnosed or undetected due to the absence of symptoms. Inheritance of NF is different from other types of NF. Intraosseous neurofibromas are rare tumors which develop from nerves supplying the periosteum or nerves following the intraosseous course. Plexiform neurofibroma with associated intraosseous neurofibroma is extremely rare. We report a case of plexiform neurofibroma in the left axilla of a 17-year-old female with associated intraosseous neurofibroma in adjoining left humerus.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):3-3
      PubDate: Tue,30 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_76_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Pancreaticoportal Fistula Formation as a Consequence of Recurrent Acute
           Pancreatitis: Clinical and Imaging Considerations

    • Authors: Mina S Makary, Edward L Gayou, Douglas Kyrouac, Zarine K Shah
      Pages: 4 - 4
      Abstract: Mina S Makary, Edward L Gayou, Douglas Kyrouac, Zarine K Shah
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):4-4
      A pancreatic-portal vein fistula (PPVF) is an extremely rare complication of pancreatitis. In this report, we present a patient with a PPVF in the setting of recurrent pancreatitis and portal vein thrombosis diagnosed by cross-sectional imaging and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography, who responded to medical management and anticoagulation. A critical review of this disease process is explored to highlight pathology, imaging characteristics, and essential alternative diagnostic considerations. We also discuss potential complications and current treatment strategies. PPVFs pose a unique diagnostic challenge and awareness of its clinical presentation can further improve patient outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):4-4
      PubDate: Tue,30 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_84_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Necrotizing fasciitis of thoracic and abdominal wall with emphysematous
           pyelonephritis and retroperitoneal abscess

    • Authors: Sanjay Mhalasakant Khaladkar, Kunaal Mahesh Jain, Rajesh Kuber, Sidappa Gandage
      Pages: 7 - 7
      Abstract: Sanjay Mhalasakant Khaladkar, Kunaal Mahesh Jain, Rajesh Kuber, Sidappa Gandage
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):7-7
      Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a life-threatening severe form of pyelonephritis usually occurring in patients with diabetes mellitus with or without obstructive uropathies in whom there is necrotizing infection leading to the gas production of an unclear mechanism involving the renal parenchyma and the collecting system. Necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by progressive necrosis of fat and fascia due to deep-seated infection of subcutaneous tissue. It has a fulminant course with considerable mortality. Diabetes Mellitus is a common predisposing factor. The combined occurrence of emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis is extremely unusual. Early recognition and management is mandatory to avoid mortality. We report a case of a 53-year-old female, a known case of Type II diabetes mellitus, who presented with necrotizing fasciitis of thoracic and abdominal wall with emphysematous pyelonephritis in the left kidney with a retroperitoneal abscess.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):7-7
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_56_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Computed tomography-guided pulmonary nodule microcoil localization
           technique, misplacement errors, and complications: A pictorial essay

    • Authors: Sultan R Alharbi
      Pages: 8 - 8
      Abstract: Sultan R Alharbi
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):8-8
      Computed tomography-guided pulmonary nodule microcoil localization is done preoperatively to fluoroscopic-guided video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical resection. This pictorial essay explains and illustrates the microcoil localization technique, various microcoil placement errors, intraoperative fluoroscopy-guided resection, and postmicrocoil localization complications.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):8-8
      PubDate: Fri,9 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_86_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Radiation reduction in low dose pulsed fluoroscopy versus standard dose
           continuous fluoroscopy during fluoroscopically-guided lumbar punctures: A
           prospective controlled study

    • Authors: Shyam Sabat, Einat Slonimsky
      Pages: 9 - 9
      Abstract: Shyam Sabat, Einat Slonimsky
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):9-9
      Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiation dose reduction in fluoroscopically guided lumbar punctures (FGLP) using “pulsed fluoroscopy in a low dose mode” compared with the commonly used “continuous fluoroscopy in a standard dose mode” while maintaining the technical success. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients who underwent FGLP divided randomly to seventeen patients in the control group with standard dose continuous FGLP and eighteen patients in the study group with low-dose low-frame-rate of 3 frames per second (fps) FGLP. Entrance surface dose measurements from a dosimeter device were recorded as well as the dose area product (DAP). Results: A total of 35 patients with average age of 52 years (range: 15–87 [±17 standard deviation [SD]) were evaluated. Average entrance surface dose of the study group was significantly lower (3.81 mGy [range: 0.21–11.14, [±2.8 SD]) compared with the control group (22.45 mGy [range: 1.23–73.44, [±19.41 [SD]). The average DAP of the study group (10 mGy·cm2 [range: 1–41, [±9.8 SD]) was also significantly lower than the control group (65 mGy·cm2 [range: 5–199, [±53 SD]). Success rate was similar between the study and control groups. Conclusion: Low dose pulsed fluoroscopy of 3 fps significantly reduces radiation exposure by about 600% compared with standard dose continuous fluoroscopy in FGLP. Utilizing this radiation saving strategy will allow to dramatically reduce radiation exposure, without impacting the technical success rate.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):9-9
      PubDate: Fri,9 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_94_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Incremental Value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Further Characterizing
           Hypodense Mediastinal and Paracardiac Lesions Identified on Computed
           Tomography

    • Authors: Abhishek Chaturvedi, Chris Gange, Hakan Sahin, Apeksha Chaturvedi
      Pages: 10 - 10
      Abstract: Abhishek Chaturvedi, Chris Gange, Hakan Sahin, Apeksha Chaturvedi
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):10-10
      Mediastinal and paracardiac lesions are usually first diagnosed on a chest radiograph or echocardiogram. Often, a computed tomography is obtained to further delineate these lesions. CT may be suboptimal for evaluation of enhancement characteristics and direct extension into the adjacent mediastinal structures. With its intrinsic superior soft-tissue characterization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can better delineate these lesions, their internal tissue characteristics, and identify adhesion/invasion into adjacent structures. This pictorial essay provides a brief synopsis of the key MRI sequences and their utility in further characterizing mediastinal and paracardiac lesions.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):10-10
      PubDate: Mon,12 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_63_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction Application in
           Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Reconstruction of Spinal
           Instrumentation: A Single Saudi Center Experience

    • Authors: Amir Monir Ali
      Pages: 11 - 11
      Abstract: Amir Monir Ali
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):11-11
      Aim of the Study: The aim of the study was to evaluate the commercially available orthopedic metal artifact reduction (OMAR) technique in postoperative three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) reconstruction studies after spinal instrumentation and to investigate its clinical application. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty (120) patients with spinal metallic implants were included in the study. All had 3DCT reconstruction examinations using the OMAR software after obtaining the informed consents and approval of the Institution Ethical Committee. The degree of the artifacts, the related muscular density, the clearness of intermuscular fat planes, and definition of the adjacent vertebrae were qualitatively evaluated. The diagnostic satisfaction and quality of the 3D reconstruction images were thoroughly assessed. Results: The majority (96.7%) of 3DCT reconstruction images performed were considered satisfactory to excellent for diagnosis. Only 3.3% of the reconstructed images had rendered unacceptable diagnostic quality. Conclusion: OMAR can effectively reduce metallic artifacts in patients with spinal instrumentation with highly diagnostic 3DCT reconstruction images.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):11-11
      PubDate: Mon,12 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_92_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Laboratory Tests, Liver Vessels Color Doppler Sonography, and FibroScan
           Findings in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: An Observation
           Study

    • Authors: Ahmad Alizadeh, Fariborz Mansour-Ghanaei, Ava Roozdar, Farahnaz Joukar, Masood Sepehrimanesh, Seyedeh Amineh Hojati, Alireza Mansour-Ghanaei
      Pages: 12 - 12
      Abstract: Ahmad Alizadeh, Fariborz Mansour-Ghanaei, Ava Roozdar, Farahnaz Joukar, Masood Sepehrimanesh, Seyedeh Amineh Hojati, Alireza Mansour-Ghanaei
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):12-12
      Objective: Determination of the amount of parenchymal damage in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is crucial to choose the best treatment and management. Aim: Here, the associations between laboratory data and severity of steatosis and fibrosis plus hepatic vessel Doppler indices in NAFLD patients were investigated. Patients and Methods: Fifty patients (20 males and 30 females) with NAFLD criteria were enrolled. Fatty liver was graded by sonography (SGFL) and FibroScan (FGFL). In addition, liver fibrosis was graded through FGLF. Damages to the portal, hepatic, and splenic veins were evaluated by color Doppler/dopplex. Serum liver enzymes and C-reactive protein (CRP) were also measured. Results: Significant association existed between SGFL and FGFL (P = 0.006). Portal vein pulsatility index (PI) and phasicity plus the triphasic and monophasic pattern of hepatic veins significantly associated with fatty liver grade evaluated by sonography. Splenic vein Peak systolic velocity and PI showed significant association with FGFL. Eventually, elevated liver enzymes and CRP significantly correlated with FGLF. Conclusion: We found that the severity of fatty liver is correlated with hepatic and portal veins damages; however, the degree of parenchymal fibrosis was independent to these indices and can be directly evaluated by FGFL. In addition, elevated liver enzymes and CRP correlated with the degree of fibrosis.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):12-12
      PubDate: Tue,3 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_93_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A factor increasing venous contamination on bolus chase three-dimensional
           magnetic resonance imaging: Charcot neuroarthropathy

    • Authors: Mehmet B Cildag, Mustafa B Ertu&#287;rul, &#214;mer FK K&#246;seo&#287;lu, David G Armstrong
      Pages: 13 - 13
      Abstract: Mehmet B Cildag, Mustafa B Ertuğrul, Ömer FK Köseoğlu, David G Armstrong
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):13-13
      Background: The study aimed to evaluate the ratio of venous contamination in diabetic cases without foot lesion, with foot lesion and with Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN). Materials and Methods: Bolus-chase three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) of 396 extremities of patients with diabetes mellitus was analyzed, retrospectively. Extremities were divided into three groups as follows: diabetic patients without foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy (Group A), patients with diabetic foot ulcers (Group B) and patients with CN accompanying diabetic foot ulcers (Group C). Furthermore, amount of venous contamination classified as no venous contamination, mild venous contamination, and severe venous contamination. The relationship between venous contamination and extremity groups was investigated. Results: Severe venous contamination was seen in Group A, Group B, and Group C, 5.6%, 15.2%, and 34.1%, respectively. Statistically significant difference was seen between groups with regard to venous contamination. Conclusion: Venous contamination following bolus chase MR was higher in patients with CN.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):13-13
      PubDate: Thu,5 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_77_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Calcified Triticeous Cartilage Detected on Digital Panoramic Radiographs
           in a Sample of Lebanese Population

    • Authors: Georges Aoun, Ibrahim Nasseh
      Pages: 16 - 16
      Abstract: Georges Aoun, Ibrahim Nasseh
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):16-16
      Objective: Triticeous cartilage is a small ovoid structure belonging to the laryngeal skeleton. When calcified, it becomes visible on panoramic radiographs and be mistaken for a carotid artery calcification (CAC) associated with cerebrovascular accidents. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of calcified triticeous cartilage (CTC) detected by means of digital panoramic radiographs in a sample of Lebanese population. Materials and Methods: Digital panoramic radiographs of 500 Lebanese adult patients (281 females and 219 males) with a mean age of 47.9 years were included in this study and examined for CTC. The IBM® SPSS® for Windows version 20.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA) was used to carry out statistical analysis of the data collected. Results: Nearly 10.6% (53 out of 500) of the radiographs examined presented CTC. Of all the calcifications, 11 were on the right side, 5 on the left side, and 37 were bilateral. The cases detected belonged to 31 females and 22 males with an average age of 55.6 years (ranging from 24 to 85 years). Chi-square test did not show any statistical connection between gender and CTC, while Spearman's correlation analysis showed low positive correlation with age (r = 0.146). Conclusion: CTC can be detected on panoramic radiographs taken in daily dental practice; its identification is essential to avoid misdiagnosis with other calcifications in the neck region closely related to life-threatening risks such as CAC.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):16-16
      PubDate: Wed,18 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_11_18
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Herniation of Packing Material into a Bronchopleural Fistula after Right
           Pneumonectomy and Clagett Window

    • Authors: Iclal Ocak, Gideon Bollino, Diane Strollo
      Pages: 17 - 17
      Abstract: Iclal Ocak, Gideon Bollino, Diane Strollo
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):17-17
      Diagnosis of a bronchopleural fistula (BPF) can be challenging in patients after pneumonectomy and Clagett window. Herein, we present a case of pneumonectomy for advanced lung cancer complicated by a BPF. Herniation of packing material from the open-chest cavity into the fistula and airways on computed tomography was an important clue to making the diagnosis.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):17-17
      PubDate: Wed,18 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_70_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Renal Granulomatosis Post Intravesical Bacillus Calmette–Guerin
           Therapy for Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer

    • Authors: Karen Tran-Harding, Rashmi T Nair, Halemane Ganesh
      Pages: 18 - 18
      Abstract: Karen Tran-Harding, Rashmi T Nair, Halemane Ganesh
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):18-18
      Intravesical Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) immunotherapy is a proven, effective treatment for intermediate- and high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Minor side effects are common and expected but systemic effects can occur in <5% of treated patients. We present a rare case of a 49-year-old male that presented with fever and chills after 3 weeks of intravesical BCG therapy post transurethral resection of bladder tumor. New renal lesions were present on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan which was histologically proven to be necrotizing renal granulomatosis.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):18-18
      PubDate: Wed,18 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_83_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Role of noninvasive imaging of cerebral arterial system in ischemic
           stroke: Comparison of transcranial color-coded doppler sonography with
           magnetic resonance angiography

    • Authors: Betty Simon, Sunithi Elizabeth Mani, Shyamkumar Nidugala Keshava, Mathew Alexander, Sanjith Aaron
      Pages: 19 - 19
      Abstract: Betty Simon, Sunithi Elizabeth Mani, Shyamkumar Nidugala Keshava, Mathew Alexander, Sanjith Aaron
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):19-19
      Aim: To determine the accuracy of transcranial color-coded Doppler sonography (TCCS) in the evaluation of cerebral arterial system in patients with ischemic stroke attending a tertiary care hospital in South India. Objectives: (1) To describe the topographical distribution of atherosclerotic lesions in the cerebral circulation in patients presenting with ischemic stroke from the Indian subcontinent and (2) to determine the accuracy of TCCS for detection and quantification of intracranial stenoses in various segments of the intracerebral arterial system in comparison with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Materials and Methods: The demographic profile and risk factors of consecutive patients who presented to neurology outpatient department with cerebral ischemia and scheduled for MRA were determined. These patients had undergone neck Doppler, TCCS, and MRA. The agreement between the MRA and TCCS was assessed using kappa statistics. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of TCCS as compared to MRA were calculated. Results: Ninety patients were included in the final analysis. Intracranial atherosclerosis was found in 35.6% of cases. The agreement between TCCS and MRA in detecting lesions for the different arterial segments in the intracranial circulation was 0.83 for anterior cerebral artery (ACA), 0.66 for M1 segment of middle cerebral artery (MCA), 0.45 for M2 segment of MCA, 0.86 for terminal internal carotid artery (TICA), 0.46 for posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and 0.81 for vertebral artery (VA). The sensitivity for the detection of hemodynamically significant arterial lesions in different vascular segments was 100%, 70%, 33.3%, 90.9%, 33.3%, and 72.7% for ACA, M1, M2, TICA, PCA, and VA, respectively. Conclusion: Intracranial atherosclerosis was found to be the predominant distribution of cerebral atherosclerosis. TCCS is a safe method for evaluation of proximal basal cerebral arteries in the intracranial circulation with relatively better sensitivity in the anterior circulation.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):19-19
      PubDate: Fri,20 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_13_18
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Osteolipoma in the Forearm

    • Authors: Natalie Siu Kwan Ip, Hon Wai Lau, Wai Yu Wong, Ming Keung Yuen
      Pages: 20 - 20
      Abstract: Natalie Siu Kwan Ip, Hon Wai Lau, Wai Yu Wong, Ming Keung Yuen
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):20-20
      A case of left distal forearm and wrist osteolipoma in a 56 year old female is reported. The patient presented with a 3 year history of nontender left wrist mass. Radiographs demonstrated a lobulated mass of mixed low density and calcifications, not adjacent to and with no connection to underlying bone. Ultrasound showed a spheroid hyperechoic lesion with internal heterogeneity and rim of calcifications. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion with predominantly fat characteristics on T1 weighted and T2 weighted sequences, with rim of peripheral calcification and specks of internal calcification. Histological examination after excision of the mass showed the lesion to be an osteolipoma. Osteolipoma is a rare variant of lipoma with osseous metaplasia and should be considered in the differential of a fat containing mass with ossification.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):20-20
      PubDate: Thu,3 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_80_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Benign Sclerosing and Fibrosing Conditions of the Abdomen and Their
           Potential Mimics

    • Authors: Joseph H Mullineux, Catalin V Ivan, Jay Pancholi, Ratan Verma, Arumugam Rajesh, Sadhna Verma, James A Stephenson
      Pages: 21 - 21
      Abstract: Joseph H Mullineux, Catalin V Ivan, Jay Pancholi, Ratan Verma, Arumugam Rajesh, Sadhna Verma, James A Stephenson
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):21-21
      The process of abnormal reparative or reactive processes in the abdominal cavity, can lead to sclerosis and fibrous deposition. The relatively recent discovery of an IgG4 subgroup of immune mediated sclerosing disease 1,2 has thrown some light on the pathophysiology of these conditions. Firstly, our pictorial review aims to describe imaging findings to enhance the general radiologist's recognition and interpretation of this varied group of benign sclerotic and fibrotic abdominal processes. Secondly, along with the imaging findings, we bring into discussion the potential mimics of these pathologic processes to minimise interpretational errors. Moreover, some of the mimics of these processes are in the spectrum of malignant disease. Most importantly, to ensure a correct diagnosis thorough clinical and histopathological assessment are required to support the imaging findings presented in this review.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):21-21
      PubDate: Thu,31 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_19_18
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Role of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography in the
           characterization of focal solid hepatic lesions

    • Authors: Harshavardhan Nagolu, Sudhakar Kattoju, Chidambaranathan Natesan, Meera Krishnakumar, Sunil Kumar
      Pages: 5 - 5
      Abstract: Harshavardhan Nagolu, Sudhakar Kattoju, Chidambaranathan Natesan, Meera Krishnakumar, Sunil Kumar
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):5-5
      Objective: The purpose of the study is to investigate the usefulness of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in the characterization of focal solid liver lesions as benign, malignant, or metastatic using ARFI two-dimensional (2D) imaging and ARFI quantification (shear wave velocities [SWVs]). Materials and Methods: Sixty lesions were included in this study. The lesions were classified into three groups: Group I included benign lesions (n = 25), Group II included malignant lesions (n = 27), and Group III included metastatic lesions (n = 8). ARFI elastography was performed in all these patients using a Siemens ACUSON S 2000TM ultrasound machine. Stiffness and size of the lesions were assessed on ARFI 2D images in correlation with B-mode ultrasound images. SWVs were obtained in these lesions for the quantification of stiffness. Results: In ARFI 2D images, malignant lesions were predominantly stiffer and larger, while benign lesions were softer and similar in size (P < 0.05). The mean SWVs in benign, malignant, and metastatic lesions were 1.30 ± 0.35 m/s, 2.93 ± 0.75 m/s, and 2.77 ± 0.90 m/s, respectively. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve of SWV for differentiating benign from malignant lesions was 0.877, suggesting fair accuracy (95% confidence interval: 0.777–0.976); with a cutoff value of 2 m/s, showing sensitivity: 92%; specificity: 96%; positive predictive value: 96%; negative predictive value: 93% (P < 0.05). Statistically significant difference exists in SWV of benign and malignant or metastatic lesions. Conclusion: ARFI elastography with 2D imaging and quantification might be useful in the characterization of benign and malignant liver lesions.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):5-5
      PubDate: Mon,1 Jan 1900
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_64_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (1900)
       
  • Diagnosis and management of piriformis syndrome: a rare anatomic variant
           analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging

    • Authors: Tae Hoon Ro, Lance Edmonds
      Pages: 6 - 6
      Abstract: Tae Hoon Ro, Lance Edmonds
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):6-6
      Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon condition that causes significant pain in the posterior lower buttocks and leg due to entrapment of the sciatic nerve at the level of the piriformis muscle. In the typical anatomical presentation, the sciatic nerve exits directly ventral and inferior to the piriformis muscle and continues down the posterior leg. Several causes that have been linked to this condition include trauma, differences in leg length, hip arthroplasty, inflammation, neoplastic mass effect, and anatomic variations. A female presented with left-sided lower back and buttock pain with radiation down the posterior leg. After magnetic resonance imaging was performed, an uncommon sciatic anatomical form was identified. Although research is limited, surgical intervention shows promising results for these conditions. Accurate diagnosis and imaging modalities may help in the appropriate management of these patients.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):6-6
      PubDate: Mon,1 Jan 1900
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_58_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (1900)
       
  • Cross-sectional imaging of parotid gland nodules: A brief practical guide

    • Authors: Giuseppe Cicero, Tommaso D&#39;angelo, Sergio Racchiusa, Ignazio Salamone, Carmela Visalli, Antonio Bottari, Alfredo Blandino, Silvio Mazziotti
      Pages: 14 - 14
      Abstract: Giuseppe Cicero, Tommaso D'angelo, Sergio Racchiusa, Ignazio Salamone, Carmela Visalli, Antonio Bottari, Alfredo Blandino, Silvio Mazziotti
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):14-14
      Clinical evaluation and ultrasound examination are the first steps in the evaluation of a patient with a swelling of the parotid region. After the detection of a nodular lesion, cytological or histological confirmation is usually performed to achieve the diagnosis, while the choice of cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging) may significantly vary from one physician to another, on the basis of the degree of confidence that both radiologist and surgeon have with this kind of imaging. This work focuses on some essential “reporting points” in cross-sectional imaging evaluation of parotid nodules, chiefly helpful to the radiologist when the ultrasonography assessment is considered incomplete and requires a further evaluation.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):14-14
      PubDate: Mon,1 Jan 1900
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_8_18
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (1900)
       
  • Evaluation of quantitative and qualitative renal outcome following nephron
           sparing surgery

    • Authors: Gautam Ram Choudhary, Arup Kumar Mandal, Uttam Mete, Ravimohan Mavuduru, Anish Bhatacharia, Anupam Lal, Suresh Goyal
      Pages: 15 - 15
      Abstract: Gautam Ram Choudhary, Arup Kumar Mandal, Uttam Mete, Ravimohan Mavuduru, Anish Bhatacharia, Anupam Lal, Suresh Goyal
      Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):15-15
      Purpose: Preservation of renal function after nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) is multifactorial and the impact of individual factors on it is still a debate. This prospective study investigates the impact of factors responsible for quantitative and functional outcome after NSS. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two patients of localized renal mass (≤7 cm) were included in the study. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography abdomen was performed for characterization of tumor. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated using Tc99m-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) scan and Cockcroft-Gault (CG) formula. All relevant intra- and peri-operative events were noted. Follow-up work up performed at 3 months. Results: Overall, the mean ischemia time was 30.6 min, with 7.7% decrease in renal volume in the operated moiety. In follow-up, the total and ipsilateral GFR decreased. Change in renal parenchymal volume, total GFR by CG and DTPA, split GFR of tumor-bearing moiety was significant in follow-up. Size, stage, polar location of tumor, duration of surgery, type of ischemia, preoperative chronic kidney disease, and need of blood transfusion did not affect change in renal volume and function in the follow-up period. Conclusion: Renal parenchymal loss and duration of ischemia have impact on the follow-up renal function.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical Imaging Science 2018 8(1):15-15
      PubDate: Mon,1 Jan 1900
      DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_82_17
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (1900)
       
 
 
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