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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Iranian Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Research
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1735-9066 - ISSN (Online) 2228-5504
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • The Effect of Emotional Intelligence Training on Self‑efficacy in Women
           with Multiple Sclerosis

    • Authors: Zahra Mehrabi, Fatemeh Nazari, Tayebe Mehrabi, Vahid Shaygannejad
      Pages: 421 - 6
      Abstract: Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic disease of the central nervous system (CNS), causing progressive nerve damage, has disabling symptoms, and undermines self‑efficacy beliefs. Due to the importance of self‑efficacy modified in adaptation and coping with stress, this study was conducted with the aim to investigate the effect of emotional intelligence training on self‑efficacy in women with MS.Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 70 women referring to the Multiple Sclerosis Clinic of Kashani Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. The participants were randomly assigned to two groups through minimization method. In the experimental group, emotional intelligence training was performed within 8 weeks, once a week for 90 minutes, in groups of 8–9 individuals. Data were collected using the Multiple Sclerosis Self‑efficacy Scale (MSSS) before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention in both groups. Data were analyzed using independent t‑test and repeated measures ANOVA in SPSS. Results: The results of independent t‑test showed no significant difference between the groups in terms of mean self‑efficacy scores before the intervention (p > 0.05). However, there was a significant difference between the groups in this regard immediately after and 3 months after the intervention (p < 0.05). Repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant difference in the mean score of self‑efficacy and its components between the groups at different times (p < 0.05). Conclusions: It seems that emotional intelligence training is effective on the improvement of self‑efficacy of women with MS. Hence, this method can be recommended as an effective and affordable technique
      PubDate: 2017-11-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The Impact of Peer Support Program on Adherence to the Treatment Regimen
           in Patients with Hypertension: A Randomized Clinical Trial Study

    • Authors: Ameneh Haidari, Mahin Moeini, Alireza Khosravi
      Pages: 427 - 30
      Abstract: Background: High blood pressure is the greatest risk factor of death, and patients should manage to control it. Peer support program is used to control chronic diseases. This study aims to determine the effect of peer support program on adherence to the regimen in patients suffering from hypertension.
      Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted among 64 patients with hypertension referring to the Hypertension Research Center (Isfahan. Iran). The information was collected in three stages – before the start of intervention, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention using a questionnaire of adherence to the treatment regimen for high blood pressure. The questionnaires were filled using a questioning method by patients who were not aware of the study. The experimental group attended 6 sessions of the peer support program (1 hour), and the control group attended two sessions held by the researcher. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 18 software, and statistical tests were analyzed using independent t‑test and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Results: Before the intervention, there was no significant difference in adherence to the treatment regimen score between the two groups regarding the three aspects of medication regimen, diet, and activity program. Increase in scores of control group immediately after and 1 month after peer support program was higher (p < 0.001) compared to before the intervention. Conclusions: This study showed that peer support programs had a positive impact on adherence to the treatment regimen in patients suffering from hypertension.
      PubDate: 2017-11-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The Impact of an Interactive Computer Game on the Quality of Life of
           Children Undergoing Chemotherapy

    • Authors: Zahra Fazelniya, Mostafa Najafi, Alireza Moafi, Sedigheh Talakoub
      Pages: 431 - 5
      Abstract: Background: Quality of life (QOL) of children with cancer reduces right from the diagnosis of disease and the start of treatment. Computer games in medicine are utilized to interact with patients and to improve their health‑related behaviors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of an interactive computer game on the QOL of children undergoing chemotherapy.
      Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 64 children with cancer aged between 8 and12 years were selected through convenience sampling and randomly assigned to experimental or control group. The experimental group played a computer game for 3 hours a week for 4 consecutive weeks and the control group only received routine care. The data collection tool was the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 3.0 Cancer Module Child self‑report designed for children aged between 8 to 12 years. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics in SPSS software.Results: Before intervention, there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of mean total QOL score (p = 0.87). However, immediately after the intervention (p = 0.02) and 1 month after the intervention (p < 0.001), the overall mean QOL score was significantly higher in the intervention group than the control group.Conclusions: Based on the findings, computer games seem to be effective as a tool in influencing health‑related behavior and improving the QOL of children undergoing chemotherapy. Therefore, according to the findings of this study, computer games can be used to improve the QOL of children undergoing chemotherapy.
      PubDate: 2017-11-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of the Effect of Topical Application of Rosemary and Menthol
           for Musculoskeletal Pain in Hemodialysis Patients

    • Authors: Sekine Keshavarzian, Nahid Shahgholian
      Pages: 436 - 41
      Abstract: Background: Pain is the most common problem experienced by hemodialysis patients, especially musculoskeletal pain in lower extremities, which is usually not completely treated and adversely affects their quality of life. The present study was conducted with the aim to determine and compare the effects of topical application of menthol and rosemary for musculoskeletal pain in hemodialysis patients.Materials and Methods: The present single‑blind clinical trial recruited 105 eligible patients undergoing hemodialysis in selected hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences; patients were selected by convenient sampling.  articipants’ severity of pain was determined prior to intervention. They were then randomly divided into rosemary, menthol, and placebo groups. All three groups applied medication on the site of pain on their legs three times a day for three days and recorded the severity of pain four hours after morning and afternoon applications. The statistical analysis of data was performed using SPSS 18.Results: The mean score of severity of pain before the intervention was not significantly different among the three groups (p = 0.83), but it became significantly different after intervention (p = 0.001). Significant differences were observed in mean severity of pain before and after intervention in rosemary and menthol groups (p < 0.001), but not in the placebo group (p = 0.21). Conclusions: Topical application of menthol and rosemary can alleviate severity and frequency of recurrence of musculoskeletal pain in hemodialysis patients; however, according to the results of the study, none had precedence over the other.
      PubDate: 2017-11-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Challenges of Nurses’ Empowerment in the Management of Patient
           Aggression: A Qualitative Study

    • Authors: Tahereh Ramezani, Sakineh Gholamzadeh, Camellia Torabizadeh, Farkhondeh Sharif, Laaya Ahmadzadeh
      Pages: 442 - 8
      Abstract: Background: Patients’ aggression in the mental care setting is a global health problem with major psychological, physical, and economic consequences; nurse empowerment to manage this aggressive behavior is an important step in psychiatric nursing. The aim of this study was to explore psychiatric nurses’ experiences of the challenges of empowerment in the management of patients’ aggression.
      Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was performed among 20 nurses working in a major referral psychiatric center in Iran during 2014–2016. The purposive sampling method was used for selecting the participants. Data were collected through semi‑structured interviews, observations, and filed notes. Inductive content analysis was used for data analysis. Results: Three categories and ten subcategories were identified: inefficient organizational policy (limited human resources, mandatory shifts, shortage of protective equipment, lack of motivational sparks); insufficient job growth (failure to implement training programs, insufficient effort for job competence, lack of clinical guidelines); and deficiencies in the organizational culture (inadequate autonomy and authority, lack of the culture of prevention, culture of fault and blame after an incident).Conclusions: Psychiatric nurses were not satisfied with organizational empowering conditions for the management of patients’ aggression and reported low levels of access to learning opportunity, receiving support and essential resources that led to unnecessary use of containment measures. Managers must make every effort to create organizational context that make it possible to empower nurses for optimal practice.
      PubDate: 2017-11-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Describing the Phenomenon of Breastfeeding/Nursing Aversion and Agitation
           in Breastfeeding Mothers

    • Authors: Zainab Yate M. Yate
      Pages: 449 - 54
      Abstract: Background: Breastfeeding aversion and agitation (BAA) while breastfeeding is anecdotally known to occur in some women who breastfeed while pregnant or those who tandem feed a newborn and a toddler. However, it is a little‑researched area and the paucity of published literature around BAA reveals a significant gap in the literature.Materials and Methods: This study presents the findings and responses of 694 women who filled in an anonymous survey questionnaire that collected data on their basic demographics and their experiences with breastfeeding. It uses thematic and inductive content analysis, with qualitative interpretive description to present the findings. Results: The findings of this study shed light on an experienced phenomenon of aversion and agitation whilst breastfeeding, which varies in form, severity, and duration. It is characterised by feelings of anger or rage, a skin crawling  sensation and an urge to remove the suckling infant, but can also be feelings of agitation and irritability whilst the infant is latched. A number of mothers who experience aversion still continue to breastfeed, but have feelings of guilt and shame while also experiencing confusion around those feelings.Conclusions: BAA is a phenomenon that occurs in some women who breastfeed, whereby breastfeeding triggers negative emotions. The reason women experience it is not clearly known. Research is needed to understand its cause, triggers, and strategies to minimise the experience in breastfeeding mothers.
      PubDate: 2017-11-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Evaluating the Effective Factors for Reporting Medical Errors among
           Midwives Working at Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Isfahan University of
           Medical Sciences

    • Authors: Fahimeh Khorasani, Marjan Beigi
      Pages: 455 - 9
      Abstract: Background: Recently, evaluation and accreditation system of hospitals has had a special emphasis on reporting malpractices and sharing errors or lessons learnt from errors, but still due to lack of promotion of systematic approach for solving problems from the same system, this issue has remained unattended. This study was conducted to determine the effective factors for reporting medical errors among midwives.Materials and Methods: This project was a descriptive cross‑sectional observational study. Data gathering tools were a standard checklist and two researcher‑made questionnaires. Sampling for this study was conducted from all the midwives who worked at teaching hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences through census method (convenient) and lasted for 3 months. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics through SPSS 16.Results: Results showed that 79.1% of the staff reported errors and the highest rate of errors was in the process of patients’ tests. In this study, the mean score of midwives’ knowledge about the errors was 79.1 and the mean score of their attitude toward reporting errors was 70.4. There was a direct relation between the score of errors’ knowledge and attitude in the midwifery staff and reporting errors. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study about the appropriate knowledge and attitude of midwifery staff regarding errors and action toward reporting them, it is recommended to strengthen the system when it comes to errors and hospitals risks
      PubDate: 2017-11-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Do Psychosocial Factors Predict Readmission among Diabetic Elderly
           Patients'

    • Authors: Mousa Alavi, Omeleila Baharlooei, Marzieh AdelMehraban
      Pages: 460 - 4
      Abstract: Background: Despite advances in diabetes treatment, the rate of readmission is still relatively high among these patients, especially in older population. Various factors may predict readmission in these patients; hence, the aim of this study was to assess the role of psychosocial factors in predicting readmission among diabetic elderly hospitalized in selected hospitals of Isfahan.
      Materials and Methods: In this cross‑sectional study conducted from January to September 2016, 150 diabetic elderly hospitalized in selected hospitals affiliated with Isfahan University of medical sciences were chosen using a convenient sampling method. The initial information was collected by a three‑part questionnaire consisting of (a) demographic characteristics, (b) 21‑item depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS‑21), and (c) multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS). Further information about readmission was gathered 3 months after completing the questionnaires through a phone call follow‑up. Descriptive and inferential statistics (discriminant function analysis test) were used to analyze the data.Results: During 3 months after discharge, 44% of hospitalized diabetic elderly were readmitted. Analytical model predicted the readmission status of 109 individuals (of total 150 persons) in the studied units (success rate of 72.2%). Among predicting factors, depression and social support had the most and the least important roles in predicting readmission rate, respectively. Conclusions: Interventions to improve mental status (i.e., decreasing levels of depression, anxiety, and stress) and develop social support are suggested to reduce the risk of readmission among diabetic elderly patients. Nevertheless, future studies are needed to verify the value of such interventions.
      PubDate: 2017-11-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Study of the Impact of Educational Behavioral Interventions on Fatigue in
           Mothers in the Postpartum Period in the Groups of Face‑to‑Face and
           Electronic Training

    • Authors: Zahra Gholami, Soheila Mohammadirizi, Parvin Bahadoran
      Pages: 465 - 70
      Abstract: Background: Maternal fatigue in the postpartum period include factors that affect the quality of life and health of both the mother and newborn. This study aimed to investigate two educational approaches regarding mother’s fatigue in the postpartum period. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed among 110 pregnant mothers during their postpartum care using random sampling. The participants were divided in three groups, namely, face‑to‑face, e‑learning, and control groups. Interventions included individual meetings between the researcher and mothers in the face‑to‑face group and giving educational compact disc to the e‑learning department to improve maternal fatigue. Personal information and fertility data was obtained (before training); the maternal fatigue questionnaire Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) was completed before and after any type of (face‑to‑face, e‑learning, and control) education. Obtained data were analyzed using one‑way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and repeated‑measures ANOVA.Results: Results showed that both face‑to‑face and e‑learning methods had similar maternal fatigue scores. The average change on the maternal fatigue score in the second treatment was (p = 0.02) and the third treatment was (p < 0.001)among three groups that was indicative of significant statistical differences. Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference in the average maternal fatigue score between the two groups before the intervention and in the second and third groups after the intervention. Therefore, over time, the training was unaffected.Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that both face‑to‑face and e‑learning methods are effective to reduce maternal postpartum fatigue
      PubDate: 2017-11-06
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Assessment of the Relationship between Spiritual and Social Health and the
           Self‑Care Ability of Elderly People Referred to Community Health Centers
           

    • Authors: Mahboobeh Mohammadi, Mousa Alavi, Masoud Bahrami, Zahra Zandieh
      Pages: 471 - 5
      Abstract: Background: Promotion of self‑care ability among older people is an essential means to help maintain and improve their health. However, the role of spiritual and social health has not yet been considered in detail in the context of self‑care ability among elderly. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between spiritual and social health and self‑care ability of older people referred to community health centers in Isfahan.Materials and Methods: In this cross‑sectional correlation study, 200 people, aged 60 years and older, referred to healthcare centers in 2016 were recruited through convenience sampling method. Data were collected by four‑part tool comprising of: (a) demographics, (b) Ellison and Palotzin’s spiritual well‑being scale, (c) Kees’s “social health” scale, and (d) self‑care ability scale for the elderly by Soderhamn’s; data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential (independent t‑test, analysis of variance – ANOVA, Pearson’s coefficient tests, and multiple regression analysis) statistics by SPSS16 software. Results: Findings showed that the entered predictor variables were accounted for 41% of total variance (R2) of the two self‑care ability in the model (p < 0.001, F 3, 199 = 46.02). Two out of the three predictor variables including religious well‑being and social health, significantly predicted the self‑care ability of older people.Conclusions: The results of this study emphasized on the relationship between spiritual and social health of the elderly people and their ability to self‑care. Therefore, it would be recommended to keep the focus of the service resources towards improving social and spiritual health to improve self‑care ability in elderly people.

      PubDate: 2017-11-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Clinical Outcomes of High‑Risk Infant Follow‑Up Program in a
           Tertiary Care Centre

    • Authors: Kayvan Mirnia, Forouzan Akrami, Behzad Jodeiry, Mohammad Heidarzadeh, Sima Safavinia
      Pages: 476 - 80
      Abstract: Background: High‑risk infant follow‑up (HRIF) program is necessary for early detection, timely intervention, and promotion of health outcomes in vulnerable infants, ethically. The present study was carried out to assess the clinical outcomes of the HRIF Program in Alzahra hospital as a tertiary care centre, in Iran.Materials and Methods: In this cohort study, 5840 neonates were born at Alzahra hospital, from June 1, 2011 to 30th February 2012. Among those who were admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), 253 infants were recruited by census according to HRIs criteria. After doing necessary measurements and family education, information was recorded in HRI health certificate and then entered in the access database for analysis. Results: From 253 eligible HRIs registered, 241 (95%) infants attended the follow‑up clinic after discharge. A total of180 cases were recalled for further visits, 110 of which attended the clinic. Anthropometric indices had an increasing trend in the first 6 months of life. There was no significant relation between ages and stages questionnaire (ASQ) results and infant birth weight, height, and head circumference. The ratios of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) were 8.7% and 3.1%, respectively. The incidence of congenital hypothyroidism was 2:341 in HRIs.Conclusions: Although some outcomes, such as ROP, improved in our study compared to similar studies, the findings indicate an impairment of the current follow‑up processes and highlight the necessity to modify the current HRIF program. Ethically, we insist on integrating HRIF program in child health services to promote early childhood development.
      PubDate: 2017-11-06
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Comparing the Effect of Echinacea and Chlorhexidine Mouthwash on the
           

    • Authors: Mehdi Safarabadi, Ehsanollah Ghaznavi‑Rad, Abdolghader Pakniyat, Korosh Rezaie, Ali Jadidi
      Pages: 481 - 5
      Abstract: Background: Providing intubated patients admitted to the intensive care units with oral healthcare is one of the main tasks of nurses in order to prevent Ventilator‑Associated Pneumonia (VAP). This study aimed at comparing the effects of two mouthwash solutions (echinacea and chlorhexidine) on the oral microbial flora of patients hospitalized in the intensive care units.
      Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 70 patients aged between18 and 65 years undergoing tracheal intubation through the mouth in three hospitals in Arak, were selected using simple random sampling and were randomly divided into two groups: the intervention group and the control group. The oral health checklist was used to collect the data (before and after the intervention). The samples were obtained from the orally intubated patients and were then cultured in selective media. Afterwards, the aerobic microbial growth was investigated in all culture media. The data were analyzed using SPSS software.Results: The microbial flora in the echinacea group significantly decreased after the intervention (p < 0.0001) and it was also the case withmicrobial flora of the patients in the chlorhexidine group (p < 0.001). After 4 days, the oral microbial flora of the patients in the intervention group was lower than that of the patients in the control group (p < 0.001).
      Conclusions: The results showed that the echinacea solution was more effective in decreasing the oral microbial flora of patients in the intensive care unit. Given the benefits of the components of the
      PubDate: 2017-11-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The Impact of an Educational Program Regarding Total Parenteral Nutrition
           on Infection Indicators in Neonates Admitted to the Neonatal Intensive
           Care Unit

    • Authors: Maryam Marofi, Nahid Bijani, Zahra Abdeyazdan, Behzad Barekatain
      Pages: 486 - 9
      Abstract: Background: One of the basic care measures for preterm infants is providing nutrition through total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and one of the most important complications of it is infection. Because prevention of nosocomial infections is an important issue for neonate’s safety, this study aimed to determine the effects of a continuing medical education (CME) course on TPN for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses on indicators of infection in newborns.Materials and Methods: This quasi‑experimental study was conducted on 127 neonates who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. They were selected through simple convenience sampling method at two stages of before and after the CME program. The inclusion criteria were prescription of TPN by the physician and lack of clinical evidences for infection in newborns before the beginning of TPN. Death of the infant during each stage of the study was considered as the exclusion criteria. The data gathering tool was a data record sheet including clinical signs of infection in the infants and their demographic characteristics. Data were analyzed using Chi‑square test, Fisher’s exact test, and student’s t‑test in SPSS
      software.Results: The results showed the frequency of clinical markers for infection in newborns at the pre‑intervention stage (n = 41; 65.10%) was significantly less than at the post‑intervention stage (n = 30; 46.90%) (p = 0.04).
      PubDate: 2017-11-06
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Iranian Pediatric Nurse’s Experience: The Facilitators of the
           Learning of Ethical Practices

    • Authors: Kobra Karami, Sadat SeyedBagher Maddah, Abbas Abbaszadeh, Farahnaz Mohammadi Shahboulaghi, Mohammadali Hosseini, Nazila MousaviArfa, Mohammad Almasian
      Pages: 490 - 6
      Abstract: Background: Ethical care is a core value in nursing. Pediatric nurses are in direct and continuous contact with children and their parents. They manage their lives and health. As part of the pediatric nurses’ daily work, ethical issues play an important role in making decisions, are important to make decisions, and this capability is only achieved by ethical practice. This study aimed to explore the factors facilitating the learning of ethical practice among Iranian pediatric nurses.
      Materials and Methods: This study is a conventional qualitative content analysis based on the Graneheim and Lundman method. It was conducted through semi‑structured interviews with two focus groups, incorporating 28 nurses working in pediatric wards. Unstructured observation and field notes were other methods of data collection. Purposive sampling continued until data saturation was ensured. All interviews were tape recorded and transcribed in verbatim.Results: Three main categories and 12 subcategories emerged from this study. The facilitating factors include (1) individual competencies (knowledge, experience, emotional intelligence, and loving children), (2) ethical imprinting (responsibility, reflection, empathy, and ethical beliefs), and (3) an environment that nurtures moral values (organizational, spiritual, family, and cultural environments) as facilitating factors.Conclusions: The promotion of nurses’ competencies, ethical virtues, and imprinting, as well as improvement of the quality of nursing care must be the top priority of the health team. Undoubtedly, the success of the health care system is not possible without ensuring that pediatric nurses learn ethical practices.
      PubDate: 2017-11-06
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • An Interprofessional Education Pilot Study for Nursing and Speech‑
           Language Pathology Students

    • Authors: Akhtar E. Ghassemi, Renee Fabus
      Pages: 497 - 8
      Abstract: Background: Despite the complexity of patient care and promise of interprofessional collaboration in health professional educational programs, interprofessional education and practice implementation challenges exist.Materials and Methods: A pilot study with a nonequivalent comparison before/ after design was conducted to examine undergraduate students’ and graduate students’ knowledge of the role of nurses and speech‑language pathologists (SLPs) while working with patients diagnosed with dysphagia. All students received pre‑ and post‑tests assessing their knowledge of the respective profession.Results: A repeated measure of analysis of variance using pre‑ and post‑tests by group design revealed a strong and statistically significant main effect from pre‑ to post‑testing, [F (1, 19) = 17.42, p = 0.001, and partial h2 = 0.48].Conclusions: The results indicated that students received higher scores on post‑tests. This study reinforces the importance of collaboration of healthcare professionals during their professional coursework.
      PubDate: 2017-11-06
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 6 (2017)
       
 
 
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