Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 427 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 427 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Education in the Health Professions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research KLEU     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  

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Journal Cover
Indian Dermatology Online Journal
Number of Followers: 3  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2229-5178 - ISSN (Online) 2249-5673
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [427 journals]
  • Teledermatology in the wake of COVID -19 scenario: An Indian perspective

    • Authors: Karalikkattil T Ashique, Feroze Kaliyadan
      Pages: 301 - 306
      Abstract: Karalikkattil T Ashique, Feroze Kaliyadan
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):301-306

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):301-306
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_260_20
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Update on pharmacotherapy in psychodermatological disorders

    • Authors: Shrutakirthi D Shenoi, Savitha Soman, Ravindra Munoli, Smitha Prabhu
      Pages: 307 - 318
      Abstract: Shrutakirthi D Shenoi, Savitha Soman, Ravindra Munoli, Smitha Prabhu
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):307-318
      Psychodermatological (PD) conditions encountered in dermatologic practice include primary psychiatric conditions such as delusions of parasitosis or secondary psychiatric conditions such as anxiety and depression due to dermatologic disease. The psychotropics include antipsychotic agents, anti-anxiety agents, antidepressants, and miscellaneous drugs such as anti convulsants. Anti psychotics are further divided into first-generation and second-generation drugs. Currently, second-generation drugs e.g., risperidone are preferred over first-generation drugs e.g., pimozide in delusional infestation owing to the side effect profile of the latter. Anti-anxiety agents include benzodiazepines used in acute anxiety and buspirone in chronic anxiety disorders. They are frequently prescribed along with antidepressants. Although dependence and necessity of tapering is a problem with benzodiazepines, delayed onset of action is a feature of buspirone. The commonly used antidepressants in dermatology include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline), selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (venlafaxine, desvenlefaxine, and duloxetine), norepinephrine dopamine reuptake inhibitors (bupropion), tricyclic antidepressants (doxepin, amitriptyline, imipramine, and clomipramine), and tetracyclic antidepressants (mirtazapine). Miscellaneous drugs include anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin, naltrexone, and N-acetyl cysteine. The principles of PD treatment are first establish the psychiatric diagnosis, followed by initiating drug treatment. The choice of drugs is dependent on multiple factors such as side-effect profile, drug interactions, and co-morbid conditions. Usually, drugs are started at a low dose and gradually increased. A literature search was done in Pubmed, Google Scholar, and Medline databases, and articles on treatment were analyzed.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):307-318
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_330_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Biologics in dermatology: Off-label indications

    • Authors: Debdeep Mitra, Ajay Chopra, Neerja Saraswat, Barnali Mitra, Krishna Talukdar, Reetu Agarwal
      Pages: 319 - 327
      Abstract: Debdeep Mitra, Ajay Chopra, Neerja Saraswat, Barnali Mitra, Krishna Talukdar, Reetu Agarwal
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):319-327
      Skin and subcutaneous diseases affect millions of people worldwide, causing significant morbidity. Biologics are becoming increasingly useful for the treatment of many skin diseases, particularly as alternatives for patients who have failed to tolerate or respond to conventional systemic therapies. Biological therapies provide a targeted approach to treatment through interaction with specific components of the underlying immune and inflammatory disease processes. Advances in the understanding of disease pathophysiology for inflammatory skin diseases and in drug development have ushered in biologic therapies in dermatology. Biologic therapies are molecules that target specific proteins implicated in immune-mediated disease. This review article highlights the increasing evidence base for biologics in dermatology for off-label use.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):319-327
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_407_18
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on dermatologists and dermatology practice

    • Authors: Yasmeen Jabeen Bhat, Aaqib Aslam, Iffat Hassan, Sunil Dogra
      Pages: 328 - 332
      Abstract: Yasmeen Jabeen Bhat, Aaqib Aslam, Iffat Hassan, Sunil Dogra
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):328-332
      The COVID-19 pandemic has directly or indirectly affected every human being on this planet. It's impact on the healthcare system has been devastating. The medical fraternity across the world, including India, is facing unprecedented challenges in striving to cope up with this catastrophic outbreak. Like all other specialties, dermatology practice has been profoundly affected by this pandemic. Measures have been taken by dermatologists to control the transmission of the virus, whereas providing health care to patients in the constrained environment. Preventive measures such as social distancing and hand hygienic practices along with patient education is being prioritized. Dermatological conferences and events scheduled across the globe in the first half of year 2020 have been either cancelled or postponed to discourage gatherings. Rationalization of resources and practice of teledermatology are being encouraged in current scenario. Non-urgent visits of the patients are being discouraged and elective dermatology procedures are being postponed. Many national and international dermatology societies have recently proposed recommendations and advisories on usage of biologicals and immunomodulators in present context of COVID-19 pandemic. Urticarial, erythematous, varicelliform, purpuric and livedoid rash as well as aggravation of preexisting dermatological diseases like rosacea, eczema, atopic dermatitis, and neurodermatitis rash have been reported in Covid-19 patients. Self medications and poor compliance of dermatology patients in addition to lack of proper treatment protocols and monitoring are a serious concern in the present scenario. Strategies for future course of action, including the dermatology specific guidelines need to be framed. This issue includes a special symposium on dermatology and COVID-19 having recommendations from special interest groups (SIGs) of Indian Association of Dermatologists, Venereologists and Leprologists (IADVL) Academy on leprosy, dermatosurgery, lasers and dermoscopy.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):328-332
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_180_20
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on dermatologists and dermatology practice

    • Authors: Yasmeen Jabeen Bhat, Aaqib Aslam, Iffat Hassan, Sunil Dogra
      Pages: 328 - 332
      Abstract: Yasmeen Jabeen Bhat, Aaqib Aslam, Iffat Hassan, Sunil Dogra
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):328-332
      The COVID-19 pandemic has directly or indirectly affected every human being on this planet. It's impact on the healthcare system has been devastating. The medical fraternity across the world, including India, is facing unprecedented challenges in striving to cope up with this catastrophic outbreak. Like all other specialties, dermatology practice has been profoundly affected by this pandemic. Measures have been taken by dermatologists to control the transmission of the virus, whereas providing health care to patients in the constrained environment. Preventive measures such as social distancing and hand hygienic practices along with patient education is being prioritized. Dermatological conferences and events scheduled across the globe in the first half of year 2020 have been either cancelled or postponed to discourage gatherings. Rationalization of resources and practice of teledermatology are being encouraged in current scenario. Non-urgent visits of the patients are being discouraged and elective dermatology procedures are being postponed. Many national and international dermatology societies have recently proposed recommendations and advisories on usage of biologicals and immunomodulators in present context of COVID-19 pandemic. Urticarial, erythematous, varicelliform, purpuric and livedoid rash as well as aggravation of preexisting dermatological diseases like rosacea, eczema, atopic dermatitis, and neurodermatitis rash have been reported in Covid-19 patients. Self medications and poor compliance of dermatology patients in addition to lack of proper treatment protocols and monitoring are a serious concern in the present scenario. Strategies for future course of action, including the dermatology specific guidelines need to be framed. This issue includes a special symposium on dermatology and COVID-19 having recommendations from special interest groups (SIGs) of Indian Association of Dermatologists, Venereologists and Leprologists (IADVL) Academy on leprosy, dermatosurgery, lasers and dermoscopy.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):328-332
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_180_20
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Dermatosurgery practice and implications of COVID-19 pandemic:
           Recommendations by IADVL SIG Dermatosurgery (IADVL Academy)

    • Authors: Anup K Lahiry, Chander Grover, Syed Mubashir, Karalikkattil T Ashique, C Madura, Nilesh Goyal, Ankur Talwar, Sanjeev Gupta, Anirudh D Gulanikar, Sidhartha Das
      Pages: 333 - 336
      Abstract: Anup K Lahiry, Chander Grover, Syed Mubashir, Karalikkattil T Ashique, C Madura, Nilesh Goyal, Ankur Talwar, Sanjeev Gupta, Anirudh D Gulanikar, Sidhartha Das
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):333-336

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):333-336
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_237_20
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Lasers use in dermatology practice in the evolving COVID-19 scenario:
           Recommendations by SIG lasers (IADVL academy)

    • Authors: Sachin Dhawan, Pradeep Kumari, Abhishek De, Anuj Pall, David Pudukadan, Ekta Romi, K Jyothy, MD Selvam, Sahil Mrigpuri, Swapnil Shah, Salim Thurakkal, Sunil Trivedi
      Pages: 337 - 342
      Abstract: Sachin Dhawan, Pradeep Kumari, Abhishek De, Anuj Pall, David Pudukadan, Ekta Romi, K Jyothy, MD Selvam, Sahil Mrigpuri, Swapnil Shah, Salim Thurakkal, Sunil Trivedi
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):337-342
      The COVID-19 pandemic has taken the entire world by storm. Almost all dermatology laser procedures are considered non-essential and there is a consensus that they should be deferred till the threat of the COVID-19 is well and truly over. The article presents recommendations for the use of lasers and energy based devices in a safe manner during and in the immediate aftermath of COVID-19 pandemic. Plume generating procedures need full personal protective equipment to be used. Special precautions are required for specific laser and energy based procedures. A robust disinfection strategy based on preventing fomite borne COVID-19 transmission in the laser operating room is essential.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):337-342
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_239_20
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Dermoscopy practice during COVID-19 pandemic: Recommendations by SIG
           Dermoscopy (IADVL academy)

    • Authors: Deepak Jakhar, Yasmeen J Bhat, Manas Chatterjee, Vinay Keshavmurthy, Balachandra S Ankad, Abhijeet K Jha, Puravoor Jayasree, Sushrut Save, Samipa S Mukherjee, Hita Mehta, Satish Udare, Savitha Beergouder
      Pages: 343 - 344
      Abstract: Deepak Jakhar, Yasmeen J Bhat, Manas Chatterjee, Vinay Keshavmurthy, Balachandra S Ankad, Abhijeet K Jha, Puravoor Jayasree, Sushrut Save, Samipa S Mukherjee, Hita Mehta, Satish Udare, Savitha Beergouder
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):343-344

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):343-344
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_231_20
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Management of leprosy in the context of COVID-19 pandemic: Recommendations
           by SIG leprosy (IADVL academy)

    • Authors: Santoshdev Rathod, Sujai Suneetha, Tarun Narang, Abhishek Bhardwaj, Sunil K Gupta, Sushruth G Kamoji, PK Ashwini, Swetalina Pradhan, Shagufta P Rather, Satyadarshi Patnaik, Vikas Shankar, Sridhar Jandhyala, P Narasimha Rao, Sunil Dogra
      Pages: 345 - 348
      Abstract: Santoshdev Rathod, Sujai Suneetha, Tarun Narang, Abhishek Bhardwaj, Sunil K Gupta, Sushruth G Kamoji, PK Ashwini, Swetalina Pradhan, Shagufta P Rather, Satyadarshi Patnaik, Vikas Shankar, Sridhar Jandhyala, P Narasimha Rao, Sunil Dogra
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):345-348

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):345-348
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_234_20
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • A randomized study to evaluate the efficacy fractional CO2laser,
           microneedling and platelet rich plasma in post-acne scarring

    • Authors: T Pooja, KV T. Gopal, T Narayana Rao, B Gayatri Devi, S Ashwin Kumar
      Pages: 349 - 354
      Abstract: T Pooja, KV T. Gopal, T Narayana Rao, B Gayatri Devi, S Ashwin Kumar
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):349-354
      Background: Acne scarring commonly seen in young adults causes marked psychological distress. Commonly used procedural treatments for post-acne scarring have limited efficacy. This prospective, randomized study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects offractional CO2 laser, microneedling, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in post-acne scarring. Materials and Methods: Sixty clinically diagnosed cases of post-acne scarring of both sexes were enrolled and divided into three groups of 20 patients each. The severity of scarring was graded as per the qualitative and quantitative grading system proposed by Goodman and Baron. Group A, B, and C patients were treated with fractional CO2 laser, microneedling, and PRP,respectively, at monthly intervals for foursessions. Improve men tin quantitative and qualitative grades of scars and adverse effects were noted at each session and 1 month after the final sitting. Statistical analysis was done using Student 't' test for quantitative values and Chi square test for qualitative values. Results: At the end of foursessions, based on mean percentage of improvement in quantitative grade, the efficacy of fractional CO2 laser is significantly greater than that of PRP (P = 0.00), while CO2 laser and microneedling did not show significant difference (P = 0.106). Based on qualitative scores, fractional CO2 laser group showed statistically higher therapeutic efficacy compared to microneedling and PRP (P = 0.00).No significant adverse effects were encountered in any groups. Conclusion: Fractional CO2laser resurfacing is more efficacious than microneedling and PRP. Unsatisfactory results were obtained with PRP as monotherapy in post-acne scarring.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):349-354
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_370_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Profile of defaulters and pattern of treatment default among leprosy
           patients at a tertiary care hospital: A 10-year analysis

    • Authors: Sabha Mushtaq, Devraj Dogra, Nafis Faizi, Naina Dogra
      Pages: 355 - 360
      Abstract: Sabha Mushtaq, Devraj Dogra, Nafis Faizi, Naina Dogra
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):355-360
      Background: The focus of leprosy control programs worldwide today is the WHO multidrug therapy which adequately cures the disease. Incomplete treatment puts not only the patient but the entire community at risk which may further jeopardize the leprosy control program. Objective: To study the magnitude of treatment default among leprosy patients, its trend in the last 10 years, and association with clinicodemographic variables. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study conducted at the urban leprosy center (ULC) attached to the dermatology department of a tertiary care centre. Data were obtained from the standard leprosy cards maintained at ULC from 2005–14. The following data were collected from the preformatted cards: age, gender, residence, occupation, type of leprosy, treatment, time of default, and so on and analyzed to see the association of defaulter status with sociodemographic and disease-related variables. Results: In a total of 743 cases, the rate of treatment default was 39.3%. The default status was found to have decreased significantly over the years from 2005–14 (P = 0.03). Majority of the treatment defaulters were migrants (47.9%) as compared with natives (29.7%) (P < 0.001). Regardless of the residential status, treatment default was more in pure neuritic (58.5%) and tuberculoid type (40.7%) as compared with others (P < 0.001). Smear negative cases (40.0%) were more likely to default than smear-positive cases (31.4%) (P < 0.001). Rate of defaulting was more among patients in the district where ULC was located than in the districts away from ULC (P = 0.017). Conclusion: Though the study period witnessed an overall decreasing trend over the 10-year period, treatment default remains a major concern in leprosy. Adherence to treatment is central to the success of leprosy control programs and therefore the factors associated with defaulting from treatment need to be addressed.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):355-360
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_393_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • A cross-sectional observational study of clinical spectrum and prevalence
           of fixed food eruption in a tertiary care hospital

    • Authors: Loknandini Sharma, Reetu Agarwal, Ajay Chopra, Barnali Mitra
      Pages: 361 - 366
      Abstract: Loknandini Sharma, Reetu Agarwal, Ajay Chopra, Barnali Mitra
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):361-366
      Background: Fixed food eruption (FFE) is a rare type of hypersensitivity reaction occurring after ingestion of some food items in the form of recurrent erythematous patches, bullae, vesicle, or pustule at the same site after ingestion of same or related food products. Various items listed responsible for causing FFE include tree nuts, groundnuts, legumes, lentils, eggs, fruits like kiwi, strawberry, tonic water, and tartrazine. Its more commonly reported in developed countries with no Indian studies as of yet. We studied the clinical spectrum and prevalence of FFE in a tertiary care hospital. Objective: To study the prevalence and pattern of FFE after eliminating all other possible causes including drug rash. Materials and Methods: A cross-section observational study of 27 consecutive patients suspected to have fixed food eruption after eliminating all possibilities of any drug reaction to the best of our knowledge. Informed consent was obtained from the patients, and ethical clearance was taken from the hospital ethical committee. Results: A total of 27 patients were studied out of which 18 (66.66%) were females and 9 (33.33%) were males. The prevalence of fixed food eruption was calculated to be 0.072%.Fixed food eruption was noted secondary to cashew nuts (14.8%), almonds (7.4%), walnut (7.4%), pistachio (3.7%), strawberry (3.7%), kiwi (3.7%), and cheese crisps (3.7%). Conclusion: This observational study highlights the varied patterns of fixed food eruptions as well as the burden of disease in population secondary to certain diets.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):361-366
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_340_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Peripheral arteriovenous malformations&#8212;A case series

    • Authors: Lydia Mathew, Renu George, Raja Sekhar Meeniga, Vinu Moses, Shyamkumar N Keshava
      Pages: 367 - 372
      Abstract: Lydia Mathew, Renu George, Raja Sekhar Meeniga, Vinu Moses, Shyamkumar N Keshava
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):367-372
      Context: Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are aggressive vascular malformations that often result in significant morbidity. Patients may present to a dermatologist due to associated skin changes. Early diagnosis is important as treatment is available to halt their progression toward irreversible destruction of adjacent tissues. Aims: To study the clinical profile of peripheral AVMs presenting to the dermatologist and to provide a diagnostic algorithm. Settings and Design: A retrospective study of patients of all age groups with peripheral AVMs who presented to the Department of Dermatology at a tertiary care hospital in India was performed. Syndromic forms were also included. Subjects and Methods: We conducted a search of patients with peripheral AVMs, which were seen over a period of 51 months, i.e., from July 2014 to September 2018, from electronic medical records and reviewed their clinical details. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics such as frequency, mean, and median were computed. Results: We report a series of 13 patients with peripheral AVMs, which constituted 6.7% (13/193) of all vascular malformations during this period. Of these, 8.3% (1/12) belonged to Schobinger's stage 1, 41.7% (5/12) to stage 2, 50% (6/12) to stage 3, and one with subcutaneous involvement devoid of cutaneous changes. The most common location was the extremities, which was seen in 53.8% (7/13). Syndromic association was present in 46.2% (6/13). Management included embolization, surgery, and medical treatment. Conclusions: The proportion of peripheral AVMs out of all vascular malformations was similar to reported studies. The extremities were more frequently involved as compared to the head and neck. The diagnostic algorithm provided will help us to optimize investigations and direct early management.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):367-372
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_207_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Psychosocial and financial impact of disease among patients of
           dermatophytosis, a questionnaire-based observational study

    • Authors: Nayankumar H Patel, Jignaben K Padhiyar, Ani P Patel, Aseem S Chhebber, Bhagirath R Patel, Tejas D Patel
      Pages: 373 - 377
      Abstract: Nayankumar H Patel, Jignaben K Padhiyar, Ani P Patel, Aseem S Chhebber, Bhagirath R Patel, Tejas D Patel
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):373-377
      Introduction: In the present epidemic of chronic, recalcitrant, and widespread dermatophytosis, impact of disease on quality of life (QoL) can be severe. Similarly, financial impact due to treatment cost and loss of wages needs consideration too. Aims and Objectives: Our primary aim was to evaluate the impact of dermatophytosis on QoL and the financial burden on individual and family. Materials and Methods: Adult patients having dermatophytosis were included in the study. Standard Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire was used to evaluate the psychosocial impact, and financial burden was evaluated by nine binary questions. Results: A total of completed 299 DLQI surveys and 275 financial burden surveys were taken for final analysis. Mean DLQI was 12.25 (SD = 5.56, n = 299). Significant association between total body surface area (BSA) and DLQI score was observed (rs= 0.251,P <0.001, n = 299). Presence of tinea corporis was found to be significantly affecting the choice of clothing (P = 0.018, χ2 = 5.127, CI 95%). More numbers of male respondents reported loss of work or study hours due to their illness (P = 0.015, χ2 = 5.196, CI 95%), which was significantly associated with the BSA involved (P < 0.05, t = 5.529, CI 95%). Some difficulties in sexual activity were reported by 35.6% patients, which has significant association with tinea cruris (P = 0.001, χ2 = 10.810, CI 95%). Median household income was 10,000 INR and interquartile range (IQR) being 8,000–19,000. Mean financial burden calculated at 3.458 (SD = 1.696, n = 275), whereas mean financial worry reported by patient stood at 3.661 (SD = 1.216, n = 275). Financial burden showed significant correlation with “previous treatment approximate cost,” financial worry, and DLQI (P < 0.05, CI 95%). Financial worry (P = 0.016, rs= 0.145, CI 95%) and financial burden (P = 0.002, rs- = 0.145, CI 95%) both showed positive correlation with duration of disease. Conclusion: In present scenario of Dermatophytosis in India, the disease and its treatment causing impact on QOL as well as on personal financial burden and worry need consideration.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):373-377
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_331_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Correlation of cutaneous manifestations with body mass index, blood
           glucose, and hormonal levels in patients with polycystic ovarian disease

    • Authors: Yugal K Sharma, Shivanti Chauhan, Pallavi Singh, Kirti Deo
      Pages: 378 - 381
      Abstract: Yugal K Sharma, Shivanti Chauhan, Pallavi Singh, Kirti Deo
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):378-381
      Background: Polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) is characterized by oligo/anovulation, ultrasonographic evidence of polycystic ovaries and cutaneous features such as hirsutism, acne, acanthosis nigricans, androgentic alopecia, and signs of virilization. Aim: Correlation of dermatological manifestations with body mass index (BMI), blood glucose, and levels of free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) in patients of PCOD hailing from Pimpri, Pune. Subjects and Methods: This observational study was carried out from November 2015–April 2017 on 102 patients (aged 12–45 years, non-pregnant) of PCOD, attending dermatology/gynecology outpatient departments. After recording socio-demographic/menstrual and medical history, BMI was calculated and examination of cutaneous manifestations were done. Participants were then subjected to pelvic ultrasonography and blood sugar/hormonal estimation. Statistical Analysis: By using statistical package for the Social Sciences 17.0 software, Chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test. Results: Age: 59.80% belonged to the third decade (range,12–40; mean, 26.27 ± 5.05 years); ultrasonography revealed polycystic ovaries in 79.41%. Cutaneous manifestations recorded were – acne (74.50%); acanthosis nigricans (50%); striae (49.02%); hirsutism (40.19%); acrochordons (36.27%); seborrheic dermatitis (32.35%), and androgenetic alopecia (30.39%). Free testosterone (35;34.31%), DHEAS (9;8.82%), LH and FSH (2;1.96% each), and LH: FSH ratio (51;50%) were raised. Statistical association of acanthosis nigricans emerged with free testosterone (P = 0.034), DHEAS (P = 0.016), fasting blood sugar (P = 0.01), and raised BMI (P = 0.002) and of hirsutism with raised DHEAS (P = 0.016), free testosterone (P = 0.012), and BMI (P = 0.022). Conclusion: Significant correlations demonstrated were acanthosis nigricans with free testosterone, DHEAS, FBS, and BMI and hirsutism with DHEAS, free testosterone, and BMI.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):378-381
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_193_18
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Nailfold capillaroscopy and retinal findings in patients with systemic
           sclerosis: Is there an association?

    • Authors: Deepak Jakhar, Chander Grover, Archana Singal, GK Das
      Pages: 382 - 386
      Abstract: Deepak Jakhar, Chander Grover, Archana Singal, GK Das
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):382-386
      Introduction: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by fibrosis and intimal proliferation of cutaneous and visceral small vessels. These architectural abnormalities can be visualized with nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC); the changes being quite characteristic. At the same time, morphological alterations in retinal vascular bed are expected but sparsely described. Aim: We aimed to characterize the frequency and type of retinal microvascular changes in patients with SSc and to analyze any association with NFC changes. Patients and Methods: With institutional ethical committee approval, we recruited 45 consecutive patients with SSc (diagnosed based on American College of Rheumatology and European League against Rheumatism [ACR/EULAR-2013] criteria). NFC was done for all of them with a Universal Serial Bus (USB) dermatoscope; additionally, fundoscopy, fundus photography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were analyzed. Disease characteristics in patients with and without retinal disease were compared. Results: Among the 45 SSc patients, 12 (26.67%) had limited cutaneous SSc (lSSc) while 33 (73.33%) had diffuse cutaneous disease (dSSc). Retinal microvascular changes seen as mild arteriolar alteration and arteriovenous crossing changes were recorded in 13 patients (28.89%); mostly in those with dSSc (12/13). The NFC architectural changes were more severe in patients with retinal disease, though the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Patients with SSc can often have retinal microvascular abnormalities commensurate with the vascular changes characteristic of SSc. The severity of retinal changes correlates with changes in NFC. NFC, which is now an essential tool for the management of SSc, could be a surrogate marker for retinal involvement in these patients.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):382-386
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_264_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Use of transient elastography in detection of liver fibrosis in psoriasis
           patients – A cross- sectional study

    • Authors: Shekhar Neema, D Banerjee, S Radhakrishnan, Biju Vasudevan, Preema Sinha, Bhavni Oberoi
      Pages: 387 - 390
      Abstract: Shekhar Neema, D Banerjee, S Radhakrishnan, Biju Vasudevan, Preema Sinha, Bhavni Oberoi
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):387-390
      Background and Aims: The risk of liver damage in psoriasis increases with increase in cumulative dose of methotrexate and guidelines suggest use of liver biopsy for risk mitigation. Recently, transient elastography (TE) has been used for detection of liver fibrosis. Most studies for TE are in hepatitis B and C patients. However, psoriasis patients have risk factors like metabolic syndrome which predisposes them to increased risk of liver damage due to methotrexate. This underlying liver disease may change the TE values in patients with psoriasis. The aim of this study is to determine utility of transient elastography in detection of liver fibrosis in patients with psoriasis. Methods: 82 patients with chronic plaque psoriasis requiring systemic therapy or already on methotrexate were included in the study. Clinical examinationand biochemical investigations were conducted. Data were analysed using STATA 12.1 (Texas, USA). Univariate analysis using Chi-square and independent't-test' was carried out to evaluate the association between categorical variables and outcomes. Results: Patients consists of 62 males and 20 females. TE value >7 kPa (kilopascal) were seen in 23 patients and <7 kPa were seen in 59 patients. Value of >7 kPa was significantly associated with age, waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, fasting and post prandial blood sugar, AST, PASI and presence of metabolic syndrome. Cumulative methotrexate dose was not significantly associated with high TE value. Mean TE value in patients with metabolic syndrome was significantly higher. Limitations: Small sample size and inability to confirm TE findings on liver biopsy. Conclusion: TE is a non-invasive tool for detection of liver fibrosis. Value of >7 kPa correlates with liver fibrosis in most chronic liver diseases. However, high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in psoriasis patientsmayconfound utility of TE for monitoring of methotrexate toxicity.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):387-390
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_312_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Etiopathological and clinical study of acute generalized exanthematous
           pustulosis: Experience from a tertiary care hospital in North India

    • Authors: Yasmeen J Bhat, Saniya Akhtar, Muzaffar Ahmad, Iffat Hassan, Rohi Wani
      Pages: 391 - 397
      Abstract: Yasmeen J Bhat, Saniya Akhtar, Muzaffar Ahmad, Iffat Hassan, Rohi Wani
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):391-397
      Background: Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a type of severe cutaneous adverse reaction that is characterized by the rapid development of nonfollicular, sterile pustules on an erythematous base. Objectives: The aim of our study was to enroll all cases of AGEP reporting to our department over a period of one year and to find out the clinical and etiological profile of the patients. Materials and Methods: All the patients reporting to our department with clinical features suggestive of AGEP were enrolled for the study. Careful history and examination were done to rule out other causes of pustular eruptions, which can resemble AGEP. AGEP validation score of the EuroSCAR study group was used to establish the diagnosis. Results: A total of 16 patients were enrolled during the study period of one year. The majority of the patients were females with a mean age of 28.41 ± 12.2 years. Twelve (75%) of the patients had a history of drug intake while 4 (25%) had developed AGEP following an insect bite. Penicillins were the causative factor in five patients followed by cephalosporins in three patients, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in 2 patients, and terbinafine in 1 patient. Tetanus toxoid was responsible for the development of AGEP in one patient. The insect bites were all spider bites. Conclusion: AGEP is a rare type of severe cutaneous adverse drug reaction.We encountered 16 patients of AGEP over a period of one year. An important cause of AGEP was spider bite in our study group.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):391-397
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_232_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Eccrine porocarcinoma with squamous differentiation in a patient with
           oculocutaneous albinism

    • Authors: Biswajit Dey, Vandana Raphael, Caleb Harris
      Pages: 398 - 400
      Abstract: Biswajit Dey, Vandana Raphael, Caleb Harris
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):398-400
      Eccrine porocarcinoma is a rare malignant skin appendage tumor of sweat gland origin. Eccrine porocarcinoma arising in a patient of oculocutaneous albinism is extremely rare and only two cases have been reported in English literature to the best of our knowledge. Out of the two cases of eccrine porocarcinoma in oculocutaneous albinism, one case had squamous differentiation. We report a case of eccrine porocarcinoma with squamous differentiation in a 39-year-old male, who presented with a nodular lesion on the upper left chest wall. He also had nodal and distant cutaneous metastasis.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):398-400
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_223_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Lichen simplex chronicus on the scalp: Broom fibers on dermoscopy; gear
           wheel sign and hamburger sign on histopathology

    • Authors: Sandip Agrawal, Rachita Dhurat, Smita Ghate, Aseem Sharma, Ravina Surve, Sanober Daruwalla
      Pages: 401 - 403
      Abstract: Sandip Agrawal, Rachita Dhurat, Smita Ghate, Aseem Sharma, Ravina Surve, Sanober Daruwalla
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):401-403
      Lichen simplex chronicus (LSC) is characterized by lichenification of the skin because of primary excessive scratching. Herein, we present two cases of scalp LSC with a patch showing localized hair loss and paroxysmal severely itching on that area. Dermoscopy examined the presence of broom hair fibers while histopathological examination revealed gear wheel sign, hair shafts split in two (the hamburger sign), and decrease in the size of the sebaceous glands.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):401-403
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_350_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome with arterio-veno-lymphatic malformation:
           A rare presentation

    • Authors: Bhagyashree B Supekar, Apoorva D Chopkar, Vaishali H Wankhade, Rajesh Pratap Singh, Dharitri Mukund Bhat, Parvathy Suresh
      Pages: 404 - 408
      Abstract: Bhagyashree B Supekar, Apoorva D Chopkar, Vaishali H Wankhade, Rajesh Pratap Singh, Dharitri Mukund Bhat, Parvathy Suresh
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):404-408
      Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare disorder characterized by triad of vascular malformations, varicose veins, and bony or soft tissue hypertrophy involving an extremity. Port wine stain is the most common vascular malformation associated with this syndrome. Various other rare vascular malformations described are angiokeratomas, angiokeratoma circumscriptum naeviformae, angiodermatitis, etc. This is the first instance, to the best of our knowledge, describing the capillary, venous, and lymphatic malformations in a same case of KTS.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):404-408
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_220_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Secondary syphilis with polymorphous and sweet syndrome like lesions: A
           rare case report

    • Authors: Chandra S Sirka, Arpita N Rout, Kananbala Sahu
      Pages: 409 - 412
      Abstract: Chandra S Sirka, Arpita N Rout, Kananbala Sahu
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):409-412
      Secondary syphilis can present with wide range of mucocutaneous lesions. Because of its varied morphology, it is considered a great mimicker. However, syphilitic lesions presenting as Sweet syndrome is uncommon. We report a case of a 28 year adult male presenting with erythematous edematous papules and plaques with pseudovesicular appearance, lichenoid annular plaques on skin, and painless indurated ulcer over the glans. The Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test was reactive (1:32 dilutions), and treponema pallidum hemagglutination test was positive. The histopathology from erythematous edematous lesion and genital ulcer revealed neutrophilic abscess and characteristic plasmacytic picture in biopsy, respectively. He was treated successfully with single dose intramuscular injection of benzathin penicillin 2.4 million units. This case is reported for its rarity.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):409-412
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_237_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Dowling–Degos disease with hidradenitis suppurativa and inflammatory
           arthritis in two generations

    • Authors: Anju George, Renu George, Ashish J Mathew, Ramesh B Telugu
      Pages: 413 - 415
      Abstract: Anju George, Renu George, Ashish J Mathew, Ramesh B Telugu
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):413-415
      Dowling–Degos disease (DDD) is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by reticulate brown-to-black pigmentation of the flexures, pitted perioral acneiform scars, and comedo-like follicular papules on the flexures. The diagnosis is based on characteristic clinical and histopathological features. DDD has been found to occur in association with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), arthritis, epidermoid cysts, keratoacanthomas, and squamous cell carcinoma. To date, there is only one report of DDD associated with HS and polyarticular arthritis.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):413-415
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_337_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Metastatic Crohn&#39;s disease of the vulva: A rare presentation

    • Authors: Jaskaran Batra, Sukhjot Kaur Goraya, Sandeep Grewal, Aminder Singh
      Pages: 416 - 418
      Abstract: Jaskaran Batra, Sukhjot Kaur Goraya, Sandeep Grewal, Aminder Singh
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):416-418
      Crohn's disease, a chronic inflammatory granulomatous disease of gastrointestinal tract, may rarely have extra intestinal manifestations. Vulvar Crohn's disease may be contiguous or noncontiguous with the gastrointestinal tract. It can cause significant symptoms and has a major impact on quality of life.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):416-418
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_352_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Involvement of little discussed anatomical locations in superficial
           dermatophytosis sundry observations and musings

    • Authors: Shyam Verma, Resham Vasani, Sanjeev Gupta
      Pages: 419 - 424
      Abstract: Shyam Verma, Resham Vasani, Sanjeev Gupta
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):419-424
      A rather quick change in epidemiological shift from Trichophyton rubrum to Trichophyton mentagrophytes (ITS genotype VIII), several changes in clinical presentation of superficial dermatophytoses and the the response/ the lack of it, makes this current epidemic very interesting and novel. We present here some of the relatively less discussed variants that have been described under the broad terms of tinea corporis and tinea faceie. Many of them are found to occur uncharacteristically frequently and some in areas that were never described. We describe some representative cases of female genital dermatophytoses, periumblical and periocular dermatophytosis and discuss some unusual variants like those showing sole involvement of the ear (tinea auricularis), lip (tinea labialis) and superficial dermatophytosis of the scalp skin.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):419-424
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_612_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Total cumulative dose of methotrexate is not the same as continuous
           cumulative dose: A clinician's perspective

    • Authors: Binod K Khaitan, Savera Gupta
      Pages: 425 - 427
      Abstract: Binod K Khaitan, Savera Gupta
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):425-427

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):425-427
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_361_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Response of acitretin in greither&#39;s disease: A rare case report

    • Authors: Bhagyashree B Supekar, Suyash Singh Tomar, Apoorva D Chopkar, Rajesh P Singh
      Pages: 428 - 430
      Abstract: Bhagyashree B Supekar, Suyash Singh Tomar, Apoorva D Chopkar, Rajesh P Singh
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):428-430

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):428-430
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_311_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Tuberculin skin test reaction and sarcoidosis &#8211; An unexpected
           sequela

    • Authors: Puravoor Jayasree, Karalikkattil T Ashique, Nandakumar Gopinathan Nair
      Pages: 431 - 432
      Abstract: Puravoor Jayasree, Karalikkattil T Ashique, Nandakumar Gopinathan Nair
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):431-432

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):431-432
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_276_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Chemical leucoderma of oral and labial mucosal surfaces from neem
           [Azadirachta indica]. A case series

    • Authors: Prashant B Jadhav
      Pages: 433 - 435
      Abstract: Prashant B Jadhav
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):433-435

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):433-435
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_226_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Dermoscopy-aided diagnosis of nose ring-associated pyogenic granuloma

    • Authors: Puravoor Jayasree, Feroze Kaliyadan, Haritha M Raja
      Pages: 436 - 437
      Abstract: Puravoor Jayasree, Feroze Kaliyadan, Haritha M Raja
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):436-437

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):436-437
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_155_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Camisa disease: A rare case report

    • Authors: Arpita N Rout, Kananbala Sahu, Chandra S Sirka
      Pages: 438 - 439
      Abstract: Arpita N Rout, Kananbala Sahu, Chandra S Sirka
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):438-439

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):438-439
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_236_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts: A clinician&#39;s dilemma

    • Authors: Muthu Sendhil Kumaran, Tarun Narang, Sunil Dogra, Sudhir Bhandari
      Pages: 440 - 443
      Abstract: Muthu Sendhil Kumaran, Tarun Narang, Sunil Dogra, Sudhir Bhandari
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):440-443
      Background: Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tract (OCST) is one of the rare manifestations of chronic dental infections. Although well reported in literature, it is often misdiagnosed or under diagnosed. Apart from isolated case reports especially in dental literature there is a paucity of comprehensive case series on OCST. Aims and Objectives: We undertook this study to observe the prevalence, clinico epidemiological features and management issues in these patients from a dermatological perspective. Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken analyzing the clinical records of patients registered at our outpatient department (OPD) from 2011 to 2018. Cases with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of odontogenic cutaneous sinus were included in the study. We studied the following variables: frequency, gender, age, localization, morphology, mean time of evolution and treatment response. Results: 21 patients with OCST were identified from our records. Females outnumbered males; patients in the age group between 31-40 years were more commonly affected. Three morphological presentations were noted in the form of flesh-colored dry nodules with sinus, adherent plaques with mucopurulent discharge and ulcer. Posterior set of teeth were commonly affected and mandible was the commonest site for location of sinus. The time taken for appropriate diagnosis in these cases ranged from 7-16 months. Almost all the patients responded to endodontal or root canal treatment and there were no recurrences. Conclusion: A CST of dental origin is often a diagnostic challenge, especially in cases with minimal or no dental symptoms. A thorough skin and dental examination is required for sinuses on the head and neck area with a high index of suspicion for OCST. Most cases respond to conservative, root canal therapy. An early diagnosis can save the patient from unnecessary and ineffective therapies and sometimes surgeries.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):440-443
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_261_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Pigtail hair in acute telogen effluvium &#8211; Lest we forget!

    • Authors: Rachita S Dhurat, Sandip Agrawal, Aseem Sharma, Smita Ghate
      Pages: 444 - 445
      Abstract: Rachita S Dhurat, Sandip Agrawal, Aseem Sharma, Smita Ghate
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):444-445

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):444-445
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_399_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Vesiculobullous subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus: A rare
           presentation

    • Authors: Mariana Esteves, Sofia Lopes, Paulo Santos, Filomena Azevedo
      Pages: 446 - 448
      Abstract: Mariana Esteves, Sofia Lopes, Paulo Santos, Filomena Azevedo
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):446-448

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):446-448
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_341_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Nail care for healthcare workers during COVID-19 pandemic

    • Authors: Ishmeet Kaur, Deepak Jakhar, Archana Singal, Chander Grover
      Pages: 449 - 450
      Abstract: Ishmeet Kaur, Deepak Jakhar, Archana Singal, Chander Grover
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):449-450

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):449-450
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_232_20
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Unilateral limb atrophy: Is it a forme fruste localized
           scleroderma?

    • Authors: Dharmagat Bhattarai, Pandiarajan Vignesh, Sandesh Guleria, Anindita Sinha, Manphool Singhal
      Pages: 451 - 452
      Abstract: Dharmagat Bhattarai, Pandiarajan Vignesh, Sandesh Guleria, Anindita Sinha, Manphool Singhal
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):451-452

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):451-452
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_349_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Hydroxychloroquine in dermatology and beyond: Recent update

    • Authors: Kabir Sardana, Surabhi Sinha, Soumya Sachdeva
      Pages: 453 - 464
      Abstract: Kabir Sardana, Surabhi Sinha, Soumya Sachdeva
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):453-464
      Hydroxychloroquine is one of the most frequently used drugs in dermatology with a wide variety of uses due to its immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, photoprotective, and metabolic actions and low side effect profile. Demonstration of its antiviral action in vitro has led to renewed interest by physicians worldwide during the ongoing coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Like its immunomodulatory action, its antiviral activity is also due to its ability to alkalinize the intracytoplasmic milieu, leading to disordered viral entry/fusion and deranged viral protein synthesis. However, randomized controlled trials are the need of the hour to conclusively determine its clinical efficacy in such infections. A review of the multitude of mechanisms of action, updated screening and monitoring guidelines, drug interactions, side effects, and its use in special populations is described.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):453-464
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_280_20
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Hydroxychloroquine in dermatology and beyond: Recent update

    • Authors: Kabir Sardana, Surabhi Sinha, Soumya Sachdeva
      Pages: 453 - 464
      Abstract: Kabir Sardana, Surabhi Sinha, Soumya Sachdeva
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):453-464
      Hydroxychloroquine is one of the most frequently used drugs in dermatology with a wide variety of uses due to its immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, photoprotective, and metabolic actions and low side effect profile. Demonstration of its antiviral action in vitro has led to renewed interest by physicians worldwide during the ongoing coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Like its immunomodulatory action, its antiviral activity is also due to its ability to alkalinize the intracytoplasmic milieu, leading to disordered viral entry/fusion and deranged viral protein synthesis. However, randomized controlled trials are the need of the hour to conclusively determine its clinical efficacy in such infections. A review of the multitude of mechanisms of action, updated screening and monitoring guidelines, drug interactions, side effects, and its use in special populations is presented.
      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):453-464
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_280_20
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • A simple and succinct simulation of Nikolsky phenomenon and sign

    • Authors: Keshavmurthy A Adya, Arun C Inamadar, Aparna Palit
      Pages: 465 - 465
      Abstract: Keshavmurthy A Adya, Arun C Inamadar, Aparna Palit
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):465-465

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):465-465
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_247_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Multiple facial nodules in an elderly woman

    • Authors: M&#243;nica Garcia-Arpa, Luc&#237;a Gonz&#225;lez-Ruiz, Fernanda Relea-Calatayud, Mar&#237;a Rogel-Vence
      Pages: 466 - 468
      Abstract: Mónica Garcia-Arpa, Lucía González-Ruiz, Fernanda Relea-Calatayud, María Rogel-Vence
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):466-468

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):466-468
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_439_18
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Translucent growth over hairline

    • Authors: Chandra S Sirka, Kananbala Sahu, Arpita N Rout
      Pages: 469 - 470
      Abstract: Chandra S Sirka, Kananbala Sahu, Arpita N Rout
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):469-470

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):469-470
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_464_18
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn

    • Authors: Vibhu Mendiratta, Anuja Yadav, Mani Makhija
      Pages: 471 - 472
      Abstract: Vibhu Mendiratta, Anuja Yadav, Mani Makhija
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):471-472

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):471-472
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_318_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in background of chronic arsenicosis

    • Authors: Sweta Subhadarshani, Soniya Mahajan
      Pages: 473 - 474
      Abstract: Sweta Subhadarshani, Soniya Mahajan
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):473-474

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):473-474
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_366_19
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Dermoscopy of urticaria pigmentosa

    • Authors: Payal Chauhan, Nancy Bhardway, Nadia Shirazi
      Pages: 475 - 476
      Abstract: Payal Chauhan, Nancy Bhardway, Nadia Shirazi
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):475-476

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):475-476
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_438_18
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Dermoscopy of pityriasis lichenoides chronica in an Indian girl

    • Authors: Sidharth Sonthalia, Sangeeta Varma, Uday Khopkar
      Pages: 477 - 478
      Abstract: Sidharth Sonthalia, Sangeeta Varma, Uday Khopkar
      Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):477-478

      Citation: Indian Dermatology Online Journal 2020 11(3):477-478
      PubDate: Sun,10 May 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_455_18
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2020)
       
 
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