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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 429 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 429 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access  
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.127, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access  
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)

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Journal Cover
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.353
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0976-237X
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [429 journals]
  • Can proteins cure dental cavities?

    • Authors: SG Damle
      Pages: 147 - 148
      Abstract: SG Damle
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):147-148

      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):147-148
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_342_18
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • The sugar tax: A leadership issue for the dental profession and an
           opportunity to demonstrate that oral health is part of general health

    • Authors: Raman Bedi
      Pages: 149 - 150
      Abstract: Raman Bedi
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):149-150

      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):149-150
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_343_18
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Efficacy of a calcium sucrose phosphate based toothpaste in elevating the
           level of calcium, phosphate ions in saliva and reducing plaque: A clinical
           trial

    • Authors: Leena Unnikrishnan Menon, R Balagopal Varma, Parvathy Kumaran, Arun Mamachan Xavier, Bhat Sangeetha Govinda, J Suresh Kumar
      Pages: 151 - 157
      Abstract: Leena Unnikrishnan Menon, R Balagopal Varma, Parvathy Kumaran, Arun Mamachan Xavier, Bhat Sangeetha Govinda, J Suresh Kumar
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):151-157
      Aim: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of “calcium sucrose phosphate” (CaSP) toothpaste (Enafix 5%) with ordinarily used calcium, phosphate-containing toothpaste in elevating the level of calcium, phosphate ions in saliva. Secondary aims were to evaluate substantivity and plaque-reducing ability of CaSP toothpaste. Materials and Methods: Thirty study participants of age group 6–13 years were divided into two groups: Group X (Control group) was made to continue brushing with their regularly used calcium, phosphate-containing toothpaste and Group Y (Test group) was allotted CaSP toothpaste. 1 ml of unstimulated saliva was periodically collected from both groups to determine any alteration in the salivary calcium, phosphate level. Parameters such as substantivity and plaque-reducing ability of CaSP toothpaste were also evaluated. Salivary mineral's intergroup comparison was evaluated by Student's t-test while its intragroup comparison along with the plaque amount variation in Group Y was evaluated by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test. Results: Group Y showed an increase in the salivary calcium level though not statistically significant. The increase was pronounced in samples collected on day 1. Group Y showed a consistent level of calcium, phosphate in samples collected immediately and 6 h postbrushing, indicating its substantivity. In addition, Group Y had an impact in reducing the plaque level when the 1st-month plaque score was compared with the 12th-month score. Conclusion: CaSP leads to an increase in the salivary calcium level though it was not statistically significant. Supervised brushing and dietary habits showed a positive effect on both the groups. CaSP toothpaste also showed substantivity and plaque-reducing ability.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):151-157
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_562_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Comparative evaluation of three different materials: mineral trioxide
           aggregate, triple antibiotic paste, and abscess remedy on apical
           development of vital young permanent teeth

    • Authors: Hanmanth Reddy Eppa, Ravindar Puppala, Balaji Kethineni, Sunitha Banavath, Pratej Kiran Kanumuri, Gangamolu Venkateshwara Sai Kishore
      Pages: 158 - 163
      Abstract: Hanmanth Reddy Eppa, Ravindar Puppala, Balaji Kethineni, Sunitha Banavath, Pratej Kiran Kanumuri, Gangamolu Venkateshwara Sai Kishore
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):158-163
      Aims: The aim of the study is to compare the success rate of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Triple antibiotic paste, and Abscess remedy in apical development of vital young permanent teeth. Subjects and Methods: A total of 60 children aged 6–14 years were selected and were randomly divided into three groups, each comprising of 20 children. Group I, Group II, and Group III in which MTA (Pro root), triple antibiotic paste (3Mix MP), and Abscess remedy (Product Dentaire, Switzerland) was used pulpotomy medicament. The children were recalled 1, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months for clinical and radiographic evaluation and were designed as single-blinded randomized clinical trial. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test. Results: The follow-up evaluations revealed that 56 teeth appeared to be clinically and radiographically successful at 24 months' postoperative evaluation. Four teeth treated with Abscess remedy reported pain and periapical lesion. Conclusions: Overall success rate for all the material was 93%, MTA and Triple antibiotic paste have shown 100% success rate, and Abscess remedy has shown 80% success rate.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):158-163
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_587_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • An In vitro comparison and evaluation of sealing ability of newly
           introduced c-point system, cold lateral condensation, and
           thermoplasticized gutta-percha obturating technique: A dye extraction
           study

    • Authors: Tapati Manohar Sinhal, Ruchi Rani Purvesh Shah, Pratik Subhas Jais, Nimisha Chinmay Shah, Krupali Dhirubhai Hadwani, Tushar Rothe, Neha Nilesh Sinhal
      Pages: 164 - 169
      Abstract: Tapati Manohar Sinhal, Ruchi Rani Purvesh Shah, Pratik Subhas Jais, Nimisha Chinmay Shah, Krupali Dhirubhai Hadwani, Tushar Rothe, Neha Nilesh Sinhal
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):164-169
      Aim: The aim of this study is to compare and to evaluate sealing ability of newly introduced C-point system, cold lateral condensation, and thermoplasticized gutta-percha obturating technique using a dye extraction method. Materials and Methodology: Sixty extracted maxillary central incisors were decoronated below the cementoenamel junction. Working length was established, and biomechanical preparation was done using K3 rotary files with standard irrigation protocol. Teeth were divided into three groups according to the obturation protocol; Group I-Cold lateral condensation, Group II-Thermoplasticized gutta-percha, and Group III-C-Point obturating system. After obturation all samples were subjected to microleakage assessment using dye extraction method. Obtained scores will be statistical analyzed using ANOVA test and post hoc Tukey's test. Results: One-way analysis of variance revealed that there is significant difference among the three groups with P value (0.000 < 0.05). Tukey's HSD post hoc tests for multiple comparisons test shows that the Group II and III perform significantly better than Group I. Group III performs better than Group II with no significant difference. Conclusion: All the obturating technique showed some degree of microleakage. Root canals filled with C-point system showed least microleakage followed by thermoplasticized obturating technique with no significant difference among them. C-point obturation system could be an alternative to the cold lateral condensation technique.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):164-169
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_722_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effectiveness of plaque control with novel pediatric oral hygiene need
           station (modified oral irrigation device) as compared with manual brushing
           and flossing: Randomized controlled pilot trial

    • Authors: Prashanth Sadashiva Murthy, Naseemoon Shaik, Seema Deshmukh, MS Girish
      Pages: 170 - 173
      Abstract: Prashanth Sadashiva Murthy, Naseemoon Shaik, Seema Deshmukh, MS Girish
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):170-173
      Background: Establishing good hygiene habits are valuable for present and future oral health. Below 6 years, tooth brushing should be performed by parents, as increasing dexterity and cognition may permit supervised brushing until the child is capable of independent brushing. Aim and Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of modified oral irrigation device in children in terms of plaque control and to compare the effectiveness of plaque control with manual brushing with the modified oral irrigation device in children. Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial was performed on 12 subjects who were allocated to the two study groups. After obtaining the consent, the control group was instructed tooth brushing with regular pediatric commercially available toothbrush and the intervention group with modified oral irrigation device. Plaque scores in both groups were assessed pre- and post-brushing using modified navy plaque index. Results: The data were subjected to Descriptive statistics and Paired t-test using SPSS version 22. Intragroup comparison of mean difference of plaque score in control group and intervention group pre- and post-brushing was statistically significant. Intergroup comparison of manual brushing group with modified oral irrigation group shows P < 0.05 was statistically significant. Conclusion: Within the limitation of the present study, it has been found novel pediatric oral hygiene need Station is more effective than manual brushing since it combined the effect of brushing, flossing (water floss), and rinsing in children simultaneously and at the same time did not demand any special motor skill.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):170-173
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_749_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • The relevance of root&#39;s convergence with trauma from occlusion

    • Authors: Wita Anggraini, Sri Lelyati C. Masulili, Robert Lessang
      Pages: 174 - 176
      Abstract: Wita Anggraini, Sri Lelyati C. Masulili, Robert Lessang
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):174-176
      Background: The relevance of root's convergence with trauma from occlusion has not been widely studied. Anatomically, alveolar bone support can be divided into several levels. The root which is convergent gives a critical mass of alveolar bone support to the teeth so that it is inadequate to stabilize the tooth. Aims: The purpose of the study is to observe the relevance of root's convergence with traumatic from occlusion. Settings and Design: This was an observational retrospective design. Subjects and Methods: Samples in this study consist of periapical radiograph of the maxillary and mandibular first molar teeth from the patients with periodontitis, which are aggravated with trauma from occlusion. For the root's convergence measurement, we use a line on the outer edge of the mesial, distal, occlusal, and apical planes of the tooth. To get the cutoff point of the root convergence value, receiver operating characteristic-curve test is performed. Statistical Analysis Used: Spearman test results, based on the analysis of gingival recession and loss of attachment, indicating that each increase of root convergence value will be followed by a decrease of attachment. Conclusions: Tooth which has a convergent/very convergent root contour can contribute to trauma from occlusion.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):174-176
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_752_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Antimicrobial efficacy of different natural extracts against persistent
           root canal pathogens: An In vitro study

    • Authors: MC Noushad, Biji Balan, Shabhana Basheer, Shinsus Bin Usman, MK Muhammed Askar
      Pages: 177 - 181
      Abstract: MC Noushad, Biji Balan, Shabhana Basheer, Shinsus Bin Usman, MK Muhammed Askar
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):177-181
      Introduction: The spread of drug-resistant pathogens is one of the most serious threats to successful treatment of microbial diseases. Extracts of plants such as flowers, buds, seeds, leaves, twigs, bark, herbs, wood, fruits, and roots have evoked interest as sources of natural products. Irrigation with a broad-spectrum antiseptic substance and inter-appointment intracanal medication has become a standard regimen in root canal therapy. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare the antimicrobial efficacy of different natural extracts such as guava leaf extract, Aloe vera extract, papaya leaf extract, and cashew apple extract against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity was determined using agar diffusion test. The solutions were divided into four groups: Group I – guava leaf extract, Group II – A. vera extract, and Group III – papaya leaf extract, and Group IV – cashew apple extract. The zones of inhibition of growth were recorded. The strains used for this study were E. faecalis ATCC 29212 and C. albicans ATCC 90028. Results and Conclusion: Sodium hypochlorite had demonstrated the best results among the tested solutions. Among the herbal extracts, cashew apple extract and guava leaf extract had shown statistically significant activity against E. faecalis and C. albicans.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):177-181
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_754_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Comparative evaluation of salivary cortisol levels in bruxism patients
           before and after using soft occlusal splint: An in vivo study

    • Authors: Pudi Sriharsha, Anil Kumar Gujjari, MR Dhakshaini, Akila Prashant
      Pages: 182 - 187
      Abstract: Pudi Sriharsha, Anil Kumar Gujjari, MR Dhakshaini, Akila Prashant
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):182-187
      Introduction: Bruxism is defined as a nonfunctional activity or a parafunctional habit characterized by the unconscious repetitive motion of clenching and/or grinding of the teeth. Soft occlusal splints have been considered as the first-line strategy for treating nocturnal bruxism. Cortisol is a major steroid hormone secreted by fascicular zone of the adrenal cortex, belonging to the glucocorticosteroidal group of hormones. Clinical studies have shown that when humans are placed under stress, the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical axis is activated, leading to an increase in cortical secretion. However, the effect of splint is questionable by some researchers, and best way to perceive the effect of soft splints in patients with bruxism is by evaluating the stress levels. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 individuals suffering from bruxism were selected from the Outpatient Department of Prosthodontics and Crown and Bridge, JSS Dental College and Hospital, Mysore. Saliva samples were collected before and after using the occlusal soft splints and subjected to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determining the salivary cortisol levels. Results: The collected data were subjected to appropriate descriptive statistics, paired sample t-test, and one sample t-test. The paired sample t-test shows that intragroup comparison of the mean cortisol level in the study group shows near significant values, which means there is a decrease in the salivary cortisol levels in patients after using soft occlusal splint, but statistically nonsignificant. Conclusion: In the present study, it has been found that 70% of individuals after using the soft occlusal splint showed decreased cortisol levels.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):182-187
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_756_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Comparative evaluation of coronally advanced flap using amniotic membrane
           and platelet-rich fibrin membrane in gingival recession: An 18-month
           clinical study

    • Authors: Mohd Rehan, Manish Khatri, Mansi Bansal, Komal Puri, Ashish Kumar
      Pages: 188 - 194
      Abstract: Mohd Rehan, Manish Khatri, Mansi Bansal, Komal Puri, Ashish Kumar
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):188-194
      Background: An amnion membrane is a placenta-derived tissue that consists of numerous growth factors, proteins, and stem cell reserves which help in accelerated wound healing and regeneration. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) also releases growth factors after activation from the platelets and gets trapped within fibrin matrix which has been shown to stimulate the mitogenic response in the periosteum for bone repair and regeneration during normal wound healing. This preliminary, controlled, randomized clinical trial with an 18-month follow-up was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coronally advanced flap (CAF) with either PRF membrane or bioresorbable amniotic membrane (AM) in treatment of localized gingival recession defects. Materials and Methods: Sixteen healthy adult patients presenting with Miller Class I recession defects were treated surgically with CAF along with AM (Group I) or PRF (Group II) for coverage of the recession defects. For all patients, plaque index, gingival index, bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, depth of recession, width of recession, width of attached gingiva, and gingival thickness were evaluated at 6 months and 18 months postoperatively. Statistical analysis was done using paired t-test, repeated measure analysis of variance test, Bonferroni test for intragroup comparison and unpaired t-test for intergroup comparison. Results: The results showed statistically nonsignificant (P < 0.01) difference in all clinical parameters at the 6- and 18-month follow-ups in both groups. Gingival recession in both PRF and amnion group when evaluated individually, significantly reduced from baseline to 6 months (P = 0.000) and from baseline to 18 months (P = 0.000). However, the mean value from 6 months to 18 months was statistically nonsignificant. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that both CAF + PRF and CAF + AM are equally effective in providing clinically significant outcomes with respect to root coverage with AM showing the better percentage of root coverage as compared to PRF.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):188-194
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_799_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of the effect of age, gender, and skeletal class on the
           dimensions of sella turcica using lateral cephalogram

    • Authors: Bolla Chaitanya, Keerthilatha M Pai, Yogesh Chhaparwal
      Pages: 195 - 199
      Abstract: Bolla Chaitanya, Keerthilatha M Pai, Yogesh Chhaparwal
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):195-199
      Context: Sella turcica or pituitary fossa is a saddle-shaped concavity housing the pituitary gland and seen clearly on lateral cephalogram. This makes it a good source of additional diagnostic information related to pathology of the pituitary gland or to various syndromes that affect the craniofacial region. Aims: The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the average dimensions and morphological variations of the sella turcica in different age groups and to evaluate any difference in size between males and females in the study population. Settings and Design: All the lateral cephalograms were taken by trained radiographic technicians using Planmeca Promax Ceph X-ray Machine, Finland, Inc., in a standardized manner using the same cephalostat. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and eighty lateral cephalograms were obtained under standardized conditions. With age range between 7 and 43 years, all the radiographs were distributed according to skeletal class and gender. Size and morphology of sella turcica were recorded and compared with age, gender, and skeletal class. Statistical Analysis Used: A Student's t-test, one-way ANOVA test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used. Results: The mean age of the study population was found to be 16.8 years comprising 48.6% males and 51.3% females. There was a gradual increase in linear dimensions of sella turcica with the advancement of age. The normal sella was observed in 20.6%, whereas 79.35% showed variation in morphology. Oblique anterior wall was a most common abnormal variant, whereas pyramidal shaped dorsum was rarest. Conclusions: There was no statistically significant difference in linear dimensions or morphological variations with age, gender, or type of malocclusion.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):195-199
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_805_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Clinical evaluation of increase in the width of attached gingiva using
           modified apically repositioned flap: A 9-month follow-up study

    • Authors: R Ughabharathy, Pratebha Balu, Jananni Muthu, R Saravanakumar, K Vineela, I Karthikeyan
      Pages: 200 - 204
      Abstract: R Ughabharathy, Pratebha Balu, Jananni Muthu, R Saravanakumar, K Vineela, I Karthikeyan
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):200-204
      Aim: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the increase in the width of attached gingiva (AG) in single/multiple adjacent teeth using variation of modified apically repositioned flap (MARF). Materials and Methods: A total of 20 systemically healthy controls with inadequate width of AG were recruited for the study based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. In all the individuals, variation of MARF technique was performed to increase the width of AG. Outcomes of the surgical techniques were measured in terms of probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, width of AG, and width of keratinized gingiva (KG). The results were followed up at 3 months and continued till 9 months to confirm the stability of results. Results: Treatment with this procedure resulted in a significant increase in the width of the KG and AG. The increase in KG ranged from baseline (2.0 mm) to 3.85 mm at 3rd month and the results were stable till 9th month (P < 0.001), and the increase in AG ranged from baseline (1.0 mm) to 2.85 mm at 3rd month and the results were stable till 9th month (P < 0.001). Conclusion: MARF is an effective technique in increasing the width of the keratinized tissue and AG around teeth and also offers considerable advantages over other mucogingival surgery techniques.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):200-204
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_806_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effect of diode laser-assisted flap surgery on postoperative healing and
           clinical parameters: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    • Authors: Bharathi Devi Jonnalagadda, Sruthima N. V. S. Gottumukkala, CD Dwarakanath, Suneetha Koneru
      Pages: 205 - 212
      Abstract: Bharathi Devi Jonnalagadda, Sruthima N. V. S. Gottumukkala, CD Dwarakanath, Suneetha Koneru
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):205-212
      Background and Objectives: Lasers have been widely used because of several potential benefits such as antibacterial effect and stimulation of wound healing. In addition, lasers help in hemostasis and delaying epithelial migration which may facilitate the outcome of flap surgery. Hence, this study is aimed to investigate the adjunctive effect of diode laser irradiation on conventional access flap surgery in the treatment of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 23 patients requiring periodontal flap surgery in two sextants with probing pocket depth ≥5 mm in at least three teeth post-phase I therapy were selected for a split-mouth study. Flap surgery with adjunctive diode laser irradiation was performed in the test quadrant while conventional access flap surgery was done in the control quadrant. Procedural pain and tissue response of the patients were evaluated at 3, 7, and 14 days postoperatively. Clinical parameters including probing depth, clinical attachment level, plaque index, and gingival index were recorded at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months following treatment. Results: There is no significant difference between the groups with respect to healing response of tissues; however, patients experienced more pain in test sites compared to control sites. Intragroup comparisons showed a statistically significant reduction of all clinical parameters from baseline to 6 months without any significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: Overall within the limitations of the study, diode lasers did not show any significant added benefits over conventional access flap surgery.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):205-212
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_810_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Augmentation of interdental papilla with platelet-rich fibrin

    • Authors: E Ahila, R Saravana Kumar, Vineela Katam Reddy, B Pratebha, M Jananni, V Priyadharshini
      Pages: 213 - 217
      Abstract: E Ahila, R Saravana Kumar, Vineela Katam Reddy, B Pratebha, M Jananni, V Priyadharshini
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):213-217
      Background: Dental esthetics has become a great concern for both dental practitioners and patients in addition to maintaining oral health. The presence of interproximal papillae between the maxillary anterior teeth is a key esthetic component. Recession of interdental papilla leads to various functional problems such as food impaction, phonetics and esthetic problems such as the formation of black triangle which poses a great challenge. Aim: This study aims to evaluate the augmentation of interdental papilla with platelet-rich fibrin. Materials and Methods: A total of 25 sites from systemically healthy individuals with papillary recession (Nordland and Tarnow class 1 and 2) were recruited in the study. Han and Takei procedure was planned and augmentation was done with platelet-rich fibrin. Various parameters such as distance from the tip of the contact point to the gingival margin, width of the keratinized gingiva, and Jemt score were measured at baseline, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Healing index was measured at the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd week postoperatively. Results: Data collected were statistically analyzed. Mean value of distance from the contact point to the gingival margin was 4.38 mm at baseline and at 6-month postoperatively, it reduced to 0.36 mm. There was an increase in width of the keratinized gingiva which was clinically and statistically significant. Other parameters such as healing index, Jemt score, and visual analog scale (aesthetics) were also statistically significant postoperatively.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):213-217
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_812_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Natal and neonatal teeth: A tertiary care experience

    • Authors: Shini Susan Samuel, Benjamin Jeyanth Ross, Grace Rebekah, Santosh Koshy
      Pages: 218 - 222
      Abstract: Shini Susan Samuel, Benjamin Jeyanth Ross, Grace Rebekah, Santosh Koshy
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):218-222
      Background: Presence of teeth in a neonate is a rare occurrence due to the disturbance in the biological chronology of teeth. Although uncommon, these teeth if present are found to have several clinical implications. Aims: This study aimed to describe the clinical characteristics and the treatment outcome of natal and neonatal teeth from a hospital setting. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was carried out by reviewing the hospital records of babies with natal or neonatal teeth in a tertiary hospital in Tamil Nadu between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014. Babies with complete clinical data along with their follow-up records were selected and results were analyzed. Results: Complete clinical data of 33 babies with a total of 52 teeth were included, of which 28 teeth were natal and 24 teeth were neonatal. All the teeth were located in the mandibular primary incisor region and majority were in pairs. A positive family history was present in eight cases. Extractions were carried out only in cases where the teeth were found to be extremely loose or interfering with feeding. The only local complication noted in this study was Riga–Fede disease. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that natal and neonatal teeth may have a possible hereditary basis. All the teeth were noted to be prematurely erupted primary teeth rather than supernumerary teeth. Both dentists and pediatricians need to be aware of the clinical implications of these teeth and that they should be retained unless they are symptomatic.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):218-222
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_814_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Profile of dental caries in teenagers in Mumbai City visiting Nair
           Hospital Dental College

    • Authors: Kulvinder Singh Banga, Sweta Rastogi, Siddhi Mistry
      Pages: 223 - 230
      Abstract: Kulvinder Singh Banga, Sweta Rastogi, Siddhi Mistry
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):223-230
      Background: Witnessing the alarming rise and pattern of distribution of dental caries worldwide, the need of the hour is to take initiative in preventing the spread further. Aim: This survey was conducted to determine the occurrence of dental caries and its associated risk factors in teenagers of Mumbai city who visited Nair Hospital Dental College. Materials and Methods: The objective of the study was to analyze the current dietary habits, oral hygiene status, and the number of sugar exposures in teenagers by a questionnaire followed by clinical examination which was carried out using International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) II to detect the profile of dental caries. Statistical Analysis: The data obtained from the questionnaire and examination were analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: The survey showed that, out of the 300 teenagers examined, 67% visited the dentist only when they were symptomatic. Around 60% consumed sweets 2–3 times/day. A major percentage, 89%, consumed sweets irrespective of meal time and 52% consumed aerated drinks often. Only 16% used appropriate brushing techniques and 93% were not aware if their toothpaste was fluoridated. ICDAS II revealed that a total number of teeth requiring preventive treatment ranged from 8.3% to 14% and total number of teeth requiring definitive treatment ranged from 36% to 48%. It was found that tooth most commonly treated was 36 followed by tooth number 46 showing that the incidence of caries is higher in lower arch. Conclusion: Most of the teenagers had a high rate of sweet consumption in between meals and poor knowledge of brushing techniques, fluoridated toothpaste, interdental aids, and mouthrinses. ICDAS showed a high incidence of caries in teenagers, especially in the lower arch. ICDAS II showed good accuracy in differentiating between noncavitated and cavitated lesions which helps to provide an accurate treatment plan for teenagers so that it prevents the progression of the lesion.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):223-230
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_823_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Primary molar pulpectomy using two different obturation techniques: A
           clinical study

    • Authors: C Nagarathna, Soundarya Vishwanathan, Navin H Krishnamurthy, Prasanna K Bhat
      Pages: 231 - 236
      Abstract: C Nagarathna, Soundarya Vishwanathan, Navin H Krishnamurthy, Prasanna K Bhat
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):231-236
      Context: A major goal in pediatric dentistry is preservation of the integrity of primary teeth and their supporting tissues until physiological process of exfoliation takes place. Pulpectomy serves such a purpose using various materials and techniques to fill the canals of primary teeth. Aims: The aim of this in vivo study was to determine the efficacy of modified disposable syringe technique in root canals of primary molars using digital radiography when obturated with endoflas. Settings and Design: A clinical study was undertaken for a period of 6 months. Subjects and Methods: A total of 60 primary maxillary and mandibular molars were selected in the age group of 4–8 years and randomly divided into two groups. The teeth were obturated with handheld lentulospiral and a modified disposable syringe techniques. Postoperative radiographic evaluation was done for quality of fill and voids using digital radiography. Statistical Analysis Used: Results were assessed using Chi-square test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: No statistically significant difference between quality of obturation using hand-held lentulospiral and modified disposable syringe (P < 0.05) was observed. Optimal obturation was achieved in both techniques; however, voids in obturation were not significant. Conclusions: Both the hand-held lentulospiral and modified disposable syringe technique are effective in the obturation of primary molar root canals in terms of quality of fill.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):231-236
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_826_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Antibacterial efficacy of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles against
           Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm: An in vitro study

    • Authors: Kiran Rahul Halkai, Jayashree A Mudda, Vasundhara Shivanna, Vandana Rathod, Rahul Halkai
      Pages: 237 - 241
      Abstract: Kiran Rahul Halkai, Jayashree A Mudda, Vasundhara Shivanna, Vandana Rathod, Rahul Halkai
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):237-241
      Aim: This study aims to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) produced using the fungi against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm model on root dentin. Materials and Methods: AgNPs were biosynthesized using the fungi Fusarium semitectum isolated from healthy leaves of Withania somnifera. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AgNPs was determined by microbroth dilution method using series of dilutions. MIC dose was standardized to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy. For biofilm model, thirty root dentin blocks prepared using human extracted single-rooted teeth were inoculated with E. faecalis in Trypticase soy agar broth for 2 weeks with alternate day replenishment and randomly divided into three groups (n = 10 each) and treated as: Group I: Sterile distilled water, Group II: AgNPs, and Group III: 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Each dentin block was rinsed in saline, vortex shaken for 60 s, and serial decimal dilutions were prepared and plated on trypticase soy agar plates and incubated for 24 h followed by CFU colony counting and statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference test. Results: MIC of AgNPs for E. faecalis was determined as 30 mg/ml. No significant difference was seen between AgNPs and 2% CHX when compared to the control group with mean colony counts being 2.4, 2.5, and 6.77 CFU/ml (107), respectively (P < 0.0001), against E. faecalis biofilm. Conclusion: Biosynthesized AgNPs exhibit effective antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis biofilm on root dentin. Therefore, it can be employed as antimicrobial agent for root canal disinfection.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):237-241
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_828_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Osteoradionecrosis of jaw: An institutional experience

    • Authors: Saurabh Kumar, Catherine Chandran, Rabin Chacko, JS Jesija, Arun Paul
      Pages: 242 - 248
      Abstract: Saurabh Kumar, Catherine Chandran, Rabin Chacko, JS Jesija, Arun Paul
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):242-248
      Aims and Objectives: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaw is a significant yet rare complication of radiotherapy (RT) associated with the management of head-and-neck malignancies. Recent decrease in the incidence of ORN following RT to the head and neck is being mainly attributed to refinement in RT techniques and improvement in our understanding of this morbid disease. The aim of this study is to assess the patients with ORN following head-and-neck RT to determine the various contributing risk factors involved in the development of ORN. Subjects and Methods: A retrospective data review from 2003 onward was conducted on the cases of ORN which presented to the Department of Dental and Oral Surgery, Christian Medical College, Vellore. Details of the patients with regard to the site of primary malignancy, type of treatment provided - RT alone or in combination of surgery and chemotherapy, dose of RT, presenting complaint, duration between the RT and presentation of ORN, and method of management considered were evaluated. Results: A total of 25 patients were evaluated. The average age of the 25 patients in our study was 58 years. Oropharynx (about 50%) was the leading site of primary malignancy. More than half of the patients in the study (52%) had undergone radical RT for the primary malignancy and all the patients were given >60 Gy dose of RT. About 48% of the patients in the study reported with pus discharge as their chief complaint. The average intervening time period from completion of RT to the presentation of ORN was 48 months. The mandibular alveolus was the most common site for ORN. Twelve of the 25 cases in the study were managed conservatively with only 3 patients requiring major resection. Conclusion: Due to its rare presentation, ORN still remains a challenge for the clinician in its management. Our study revealed that radical RT and concurrent chemo-RT for the oropharyngeal and base of the tongue malignancies have a higher risk of developing ORN. Patients subjected to the dose of RT above 60 Gy for head-and-neck malignancies have an increased risk of future ORN; henceforth, newer modality treatment like intensity-modulated RT regimen is recommended for such sites. Most of the patients in the study were satisfactorily managed of the symptoms with conservative modality treatment; hence, it is recommended to consider for surgical methods only in severe end-stage form of ORN.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):242-248
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_843_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Genotoxic effects of silver amalgam and composite restorations:
           Micronuclei-Based cohort and case–control study in oral exfoliated
           cells

    • Authors: S Jeslin Mary, KL Girish, T Isaac Joseph, Pradeesh Sathyan
      Pages: 249 - 254
      Abstract: S Jeslin Mary, KL Girish, T Isaac Joseph, Pradeesh Sathyan
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):249-254
      Context: A huge number of people carry dental fillings which contain either mercury-based amalgam and/or the recently introduced methacrylate-based resins. It has been shown that both these materials are known to be leached into the oral cavity and induce genotoxic alterations in the buccal mucosal cells. Because of its low cost and ease of manipulation, dental amalgam is still widely used as a restorative material in developing countries. The health risks associated with the components of this restorative material has always been a matter of concern. The present study was designed to assess the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in oral mucosal cells as it is a promising tool for studying the genotoxic effect of clastogenic agents on them. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the genotoxic effects of silver amalgam and composite restorations by measuring the mean number of MN in oral exfoliated cells. Materials and Methods: The present study was a prospective cohort study which includes a study group consisting of 110 participants. The study sample was equally divided into 55 participants requiring only amalgam restoration and 55 participants requiring only composite restoration in any permanent molar teeth. The same participants before the restoration formed the control group. Smears were obtained from each patient before and 10 days after restoration and were stained with DNA-specific Feulgen stain. The number of cells containing MN out of 500 cells were counted and recorded. After the evaluation of the slides, the results were compiled and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: There was a statistically significant (P < 0.01) variation in the mean number of MN after the restoration in both amalgam (5.41 ± 1.25) and composite (2.83 ± 0.85) restorations when compared to before the restoration. However, the mean number of MN in composite restoration was significantly less when compared to amalgam restoration. There was also a statistically significant difference in the mean number of MN in subjects with single restoration when compared with multiple restorations in both amalgam and composite restorations. Conclusions: The observations from the present study showed the genotoxic effect of amalgam and composite restorations on the oral cavity. However, composite restorations were least cytotoxic when compared to amalgam restoration. Future research and technical advancements are needed for developing safer materials for use in humans.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):249-254
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_849_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Cytotoxicity evaluation of combination irrigant regimens with MTAD on two
           different cell lines

    • Authors: Manikandan Ravinanthanan, Mithra N Hegde, Veena Shetty, Suchetha Kumari
      Pages: 255 - 259
      Abstract: Manikandan Ravinanthanan, Mithra N Hegde, Veena Shetty, Suchetha Kumari
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):255-259
      Background: Effective management of smear layer ensures adequate clinical success. Use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)/ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid regimen has been the gold standard with limitations. Commercial irrigants incorporate surface modifiers to address these drawbacks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of combination regimens on target and nontarget cell lines by trypan blue assay. Materials and Methods: Nonsurfactant combination regimen of chlorhexidine (CHX) and NaOCl (2% CHX + 2.5% NaOCl) and surfactant regimens of CHX with cetrimide (CTR) (2% CHX + 0.5% CTR) and CHX with sodium dodecyl sulfate (2% CHX + 1% SDS) were prepared. 0.9% normal saline (NS) and Biopure MTAD (100%) served as control. Cytotoxicity was evaluated on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) and Henrietta Lacks (HeLa) cell lines by trypan blue assay. Thirty microliter of the cell suspension was treated with 20 μl of irrigants. The cell suspension was loaded into Neubauer chamber after 5 min and cell count was performed under inverted microscope and expressed as viability percentage. Results: Nonsurfactant combination comprising of 2% CHX + 2.5% NaOCl formed a brownish precipitate while surfactant combination regimes were stable without any precipitate formation. NS and 2% CHX + 0.5% CTR had greater viability scores on both cell lines. Two percent CHX + 1% SDS had better viability on HeLa but were severely cytotoxic on HGF. Two percent CHX + 2.5% NaOCl and MTAD were found to be severely cytotoxic on HeLa with limited viability on HGF. Conclusion: The variation in data obtained could be possibly attributed to the difference in the cellular membrane composition and mechanism of action of combination regimens. Experimental surfactant regimen 2% CHX + 0.5% CTR shows lower cytotoxicity than MTAD.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):255-259
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_854_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • A comparison of the rate of retraction with low-level laser therapy and
           conventional retraction technique

    • Authors: Saran Arumughan, Sanju Somaiah, Sunil Muddaiah, Balakrishna Shetty, Goutham Reddy, S Roopa
      Pages: 260 - 266
      Abstract: Saran Arumughan, Sanju Somaiah, Sunil Muddaiah, Balakrishna Shetty, Goutham Reddy, S Roopa
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):260-266
      Background and Objectives: A major concern of orthodontic patients is treatment time. Reducing the treatment time requires increasing the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Research has proved that bone resorption is the rate-limiting step in tooth movement. Therefore, any procedure that potentiates osteoclastic activity is capable of increasing the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Low-level laser has been indicated to have the capability to facilitate the differentiation of the osteoclastic and osteoblastic cells, which are responsible for the bone remodeling process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the low-level laser therapy can accelerate orthodontic tooth movement during en masse retraction. Method: The study was a split-mouth design. The experimental side was exposed to biostimulation using 810 nm gallium-aluminium-arsenide diode laser. A total of 10 irradiations for 10 s per site were given 5 on the buccal side and 5 on the palatal side of the tooth. The total energy density at each application was 10 J with an interappointment gap of 3 weeks. The retraction was carried using a constant force of 150 gm. A digital vernier caliper measurement was used to measure the distance between the contact points of the maxillary canine and second premolar on 1st and 84th day. Results: The rate of orthodontic tooth movement was faster on the experimental side, and the difference between the two sides was statistically significant (P < 0.014). Interpretation and Conclusion: It was concluded that biostimulation carried out using an 810 nm diode laser is capable of increasing the rate of extraction space closure. Hence, it is capable of increasing the rate of orthodontic tooth movement.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):260-266
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_857_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • A comparative evaluation of interleukin 1 beta and prostaglandin E2 with
           and without low-level laser therapy during En masse retraction

    • Authors: Jeffy Ann Jose, Sanju Somaiah, Sunil Muddaiah, Balakrishna Shetty, Goutham Reddy, S Roopa
      Pages: 267 - 275
      Abstract: Jeffy Ann Jose, Sanju Somaiah, Sunil Muddaiah, Balakrishna Shetty, Goutham Reddy, S Roopa
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):267-275
      Background and Objectives: Orthodontic forces are known to produce mechanical damage and inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins (PGs) and interleukin (IL)-1, in the periodontium and dental pulp. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a stimulator of the on-going biological process in tissue and found to be effective in modulating cell activity, which is involved in orthodontic tooth movement. Here, a humble effort has been made to study two such cytokines, namely IL-1 β and PG E2 (PGE2) which are partially responsible for bone turnover. The purpose of this study was to compare the changes occurring in the values of IL-1 β and PGE2 in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) during en masse retraction with and without LLLT. Methodology: GCF was collected using micropipettes from the distal ends of upper canines. The experimental side was exposed to biostimulation using 810 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide diode laser and the contralateral side taken as control. A total of 10 irradiations for 10 s per site were given, five on the buccal side and five on the palatal side, to cover the entire periodontal fibers and the alveolar process around the tooth. After 7 days and 21 days of retraction, GCF sample was collected. Quantitative analysis of IL-1 β and PGE2 in the GCF samples was assessed using a commercially available Raybiotech® IL-1 β and Human PGE2. Results: (1) IL-1 β and PGE2 levels showed significant results from baseline to 21 days after LLLT irradiation. (2) LLLT-assisted retraction was significantly faster than conventional retraction. Interpretation and Conclusion: It was concluded from the study that IL-1 β and PGE2 levels peaked after LLLT. The difference in the levels of both cytokines was statistically significant.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):267-275
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_859_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Remineralizing effectiveness of calcium sucrose phosphate and fluoride
           dentifrices: An In vitro study

    • Authors: Tinsy Mary Titty, Suprabha Baranya Shrikrishna, Arathi Rao, Ramya Shenoy, Srikant Natarajan
      Pages: 276 - 282
      Abstract: Tinsy Mary Titty, Suprabha Baranya Shrikrishna, Arathi Rao, Ramya Shenoy, Srikant Natarajan
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):276-282
      Context: Dentifrices-containing remineralizing agents are known to be effective in remineralization of early enamel lesions. Aims: This study aimed to compare and evaluate the changes in surface roughness, surface morphology, and mineral content of demineralized enamel lesion after treatment with dentifrices-containing sodium monofluorophosphate, amine fluoride, and Anticay® (calcium sucrose phosphate with inorganic amorphous calcium phosphate). Settings and Design: This was an in vitro study. Subjects and Methods: Eighteen extracted maxillary molars were decoronated and sectioned into four to obtain 72 specimens. Specimens were demineralized and randomly divided into four different test groups: Group A: no treatment (control), Group B: sodium monofluorophosphate dentifrice (Colgate), Group C: amine fluoride dentifrice (Amflor), Group D: Anticay® dentifrice (EnaFix) and subjected to pH-cycling for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks, they were assessed using a profi lometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) for changes in surface roughness, surface morphology, and mineral content. Statistical Analysis Used: Intergroup comparison was done using repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Intergroup comparison revealed no significant difference in surface roughness and mineral content after remineralization between the groups. SEM images showed mineral deposition in all the dentifrice groups obliterating the defects caused due to demineralization. Conclusions: Sodium monofluorophosphate, amine fluoride-containing dentifrices, and calcium sucrose phosphate with inorganic amorphous calcium phosphate-containing dentifrice were found equivocal in their remineralizing effectiveness of early enamel lesions.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):276-282
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_862_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Significance of serum nitric oxide and superoxide dismutase in oral
           submucous fibrosis and squamous cell carcinoma: A comparative study

    • Authors: Jayachandran Sadaksharam
      Pages: 283 - 288
      Abstract: Jayachandran Sadaksharam
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):283-288
      Introduction: This study aimed at comparative analysis of serum nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels as therapeutic and prognostic biomarkers in patients with oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Materials and Methods: Eighty-seven patients were grouped into Group I (n = 29, OSMF), Group II (n = 29, oral SCC), and Group III (n = 29, controls). Two ml of venous blood was collected from patients after overnight fast to avoid any dietary influence on the serum beta-carotene. Standard protocols were followed in transfer, storage, and processing of blood. Modified copper-cadmium reduction method for rapid assay to estimate the serum NO and EnzychromTM SOD assay kit to determine SOD levels were used. Results: The mean level of NO level in Group I, Group II, and Group III was 42.49, 50.08, and 32.81, respectively, and mean level of SOD in Group I, Group II, and Group III were 207.65, 196.93, and 226.57, respectively. The P values were calculated and were statistically significant (<0.001). Conclusion: An increase in level of oxidant NO in OSMF followed by SCC and decrease in level of antioxidant SOD in OSMF followed by SCC were noted. These levels of NO and antioxidant SOD can be used as prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):283-288
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_11_18
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • In vitro evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded
           with different adhesives

    • Authors: Junaid Ahmed Shaik, Rajesh Kumar Reddy, K Bhagyalakshmi, Mithun J Shah, O Madhavi, S Venkat Ramesh
      Pages: 289 - 292
      Abstract: Junaid Ahmed Shaik, Rajesh Kumar Reddy, K Bhagyalakshmi, Mithun J Shah, O Madhavi, S Venkat Ramesh
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):289-292
      Background: There is necessary of dry operating field for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The presence of moisture can alter the bond strength. Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets with different adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, a total of 100 orthodontically extracted premolars with sound crown structure were divided into 4 equal groups of different primers. Bonding on the buccal surface of all teeth was done after acid etching with upper premolar brackets using different primers followed by light curing. Shear bond strength was evaluated with or without salivary contamination with both adhesives. A shear force for deboning the bracket was done with universal testing machine. The debonded specimens were examined at ×10 magnification to check site of bond failure and remaining adhesive on tooth using adhesive remnant index (ARI). The obtained data were statistically evaluated using SPSS 20 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) using ANOVA, Kolmogorov–Smirnov, and Levene's test at the statistical significance of P < 0.05. Results: Transbond Plus showed higher shear bond strength of 8.92 MPa under dry and 5.65 MPa with saliva contamination over Transbond XT of 7.24 MPa under dry and 2.43 MPa with saliva contamination, respectively. Higher ARI score was found without contamination in both adhesives. Conclusion: Transbond Plus hydrophilic resin had good shear bond strength under both dry and contamination condition compared to hydrophobic Transbond XT resin material.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):289-292
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_15_18
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Association of human interleukin-35 level in gingival crevicular fluid and
           serum in periodontal health, disease, and after nonsurgical therapy: A
           comparative study

    • Authors: Subash Chandra Raj, Subhashree Manaswini Panda, Muktikesh Dash, Kaushik Patnaik, Devapratim Mohanty, Neelima Katti, Annuroopa Mahapatra, Debasish Mishra, Kamdev Praharaj
      Pages: 293 - 297
      Abstract: Subash Chandra Raj, Subhashree Manaswini Panda, Muktikesh Dash, Kaushik Patnaik, Devapratim Mohanty, Neelima Katti, Annuroopa Mahapatra, Debasish Mishra, Kamdev Praharaj
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):293-297
      Background: Innovating newer methods to diagnose a multifactorial disease such as periodontitis is always challenging for a clinician. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) which is closely associated with the periodontal tissue environment has been used a viable alternative to saliva for the diagnosis of periodontitis. Aim: The aim of the present study was to estimate and compare the interleukin-35 (IL-35) levels in GCF and serum among healthy, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis (CP) individuals as well as to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment (NSPT) on IL-35 level among patients with CP. Settings and Design: The study was conducted at the Department of Periodontics, Srirama Chandra Bhanja Dental College and Hospital, Cuttack, Odisha, India. It is a comparative study. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 participants were divided into healthy (Group I; n = 20), gingivitis (Group II; n = 20), and CP (Group IIIA; n = 20). GCF samples collected from each individual at baseline and 6 weeks after NSPT for Group III individuals (Group IIIB; n = 20) were quantified for IL-35 levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical Analysis: All analyses were performed using Shapiro–Wilk test, analysis of variance, Tukey's honestly significant difference post hoc test, and multiple regression analysis. Results: The mean IL-35 concentration in GCF was significantly high (P < 0.05) for Group IIIA (70.26 ± 4.0 pg/ml), as compared to Group I (54.81 ± 22.3 pg/ml) and Group IIIB (55.72 ± 10.2 pg/ml). Conclusion: In the present study, GCF and serum IL-35 concentration among CP individuals was highest among all the groups. Individuals receiving NSPT showed a significant reduction in IL-35 levels as compared to CP individuals.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):293-297
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_51_18
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • The anti-inflammatory effects of glycerol-supplemented probiotic
           lactobacillus reuteri on infected epithelial cells In vitro

    • Authors: Armelia Sari Widyarman, Aradhea Monica Drestia, Endang Winiati Bachtiar, Boy M Bachtiar
      Pages: 298 - 303
      Abstract: Armelia Sari Widyarman, Aradhea Monica Drestia, Endang Winiati Bachtiar, Boy M Bachtiar
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):298-303
      Background: One of the most interesting effects of probiotics is their ability to modulate the immune system through the induction of cytokines and to enhance the host immune response. Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of glycerol-supplemented Lactobacillus reuteri on the transcription level of interleukin (IL)-8 and human-beta-defensin (hBD)-2 expressed by epithelial cells after exposure to bacteria. Materials and Methods: The confluent-cultured HaCat cell line (105 cells/mL) was exposed to Streptococcus mutans ATCC-25175 and Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC-33277 (107 colony-forming units [CFU]/mL) for 24 h and challenged with probiotic L. reuteri ATCC-55730 (107 CFU/mL) supplemented with glycerol. Subsequently, the transcription levels of IL-8 and hBD-2 in HaCat cells were analyzed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, cell viability was analyzed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. All the obtained data were statistically analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance test, with P < 0.05 set as the level of significance. Results: The MTT assays confirmed no cytotoxic effects of glycerol-supplemented L. reuteri on HaCat cells (viability >90%). mRNA expression of IL-8 and hBD-2 increased after exposure to both bacteria. The presence of glycerol-supplemented L. reuteri significantly reduced the expression of IL-8 and hBD-2 on HaCat cells (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Glycerol-supplemented L. reuteri reduced the expression of IL-8 and hBD-2, and the results may be proof of principle for a probiotic approach to combating inflammation. However, further studies are needed to validate this probiotic effect.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):298-303
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_53_18
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Psychological effect of prenatal diagnosis of cleft lip and palate: A
           systematic review

    • Authors: VP Sreejith, V Arun, Anooj P Devarajan, Arjun Gopinath, Madhuri Sunil
      Pages: 304 - 308
      Abstract: VP Sreejith, V Arun, Anooj P Devarajan, Arjun Gopinath, Madhuri Sunil
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):304-308
      Introduction and Background: Cleft lip and/or palate is the most common congenital craniofacial anomaly. Prenatal diagnosis of the craniofacial anomalies is possible with the advent of newer imaging modalities. The identification of the defect at an early stage in the pregnancy helps the parents to be well informed and counseled regarding the treatment possibilities and outcomes of cleft lip and palate (CLP) treatment. Objectives: To analyze the psychological effects of prenatal diagnosis of CLP on the parents. Materials and Methods: PubMed, Cochrane, and Google Scholar searches were made with search strings “prenatal diagnosis cleft lip palate,” “antenatal diagnosis,” “anomaly scan,” “psychological effect cleft lip palate,” and “prenatal counseling cleft lip palate.” Of the results obtained, studies which evaluated the psychological aspects of parents of cleft children were further included in the study. Results: Electronic search yielded 500 articles after duplication removal. Forty studies concentrated on the results of the scan and their implications predominantly in the diagnosis and management of cleft and other related abnormalities. Eight studies discussed the effects of prenatal diagnosis and counseling on the parents. Conclusion: Prenatal diagnosis enables appropriate and timely counseling of the parents by the cleft team and helps instill a sense of preparedness for the family which highly improves the quality of treatment received by the child enabling a near-to-normal quality and standard of life.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):304-308
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_673_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Palatal mucormycosis masquerading as bacterial and fungal osteomyelitis: A
           rare case report

    • Authors: Shalu Rai, Deepankar Misra, Akansha Misra, Ankit Jain, Prerna Jain, Ayush Dhawan
      Pages: 309 - 313
      Abstract: Shalu Rai, Deepankar Misra, Akansha Misra, Ankit Jain, Prerna Jain, Ayush Dhawan
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):309-313
      Mucormycosis is an acute, fulminating, fungal disease that frequently involves oral, cranial, and facial structures. It is an opportunistic fatal infection which occurs in debilitating and immunosuppressive states. This report documents a rare case of localized maxillary mucormycosis in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes, with emphasis on early and prompt diagnosis of the same.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):309-313
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_743_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Esthetic improvement of a nasolabial cutaneous sinus tract

    • Authors: Akram Belmehdi, Karima El Harti, Wafaa El Wady
      Pages: 314 - 318
      Abstract: Akram Belmehdi, Karima El Harti, Wafaa El Wady
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):314-318
      A cutaneous sinus tract of dental origin is relatively uncommon and may easily be misdiagnosed, owing to its uncommon occurrence and absence of dental symptoms. Such a lesion continues to be a diagnostic dilemma. The case described here presented a nasolabial cutaneous sinus tract of dental origin that was treated by a surgical approach with an excellent esthetic improvement.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):314-318
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_758_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • The development of eagle&#39;s syndrome after neck trauma

    • Authors: Shaifulizan Abdul Rahman, Jaswinder Singh, Rubinderan Muthusamy, Mohammad Khursheed Alam
      Pages: 319 - 322
      Abstract: Shaifulizan Abdul Rahman, Jaswinder Singh, Rubinderan Muthusamy, Mohammad Khursheed Alam
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):319-322
      Eagle's syndrome (ES) refers to a group of various types and patterns of pain which spans over the head-and-neck region owing to an elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament. These symptoms are often confused with those attributed to a wide variety of facial neuralgias. The diagnosis of ES is usually made through clinical exclusion which is then confirmed radiographically. Patients with ES are initially managed with nonsurgical therapy, but surgical resection seems to be the treatment of choice. The styloid process shortening can be achieved through an intraoral or extraoral approach. This clinical case report describes such a case of ES after sustaining neck trauma.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):319-322
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_870_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Esthetic management of a patient with severely fluorosed enamel and
           pigmented gingiva: A conservative approach

    • Authors: Sana Ali, Padmanabh Jha, Usman Khan
      Pages: 323 - 325
      Abstract: Sana Ali, Padmanabh Jha, Usman Khan
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):323-325
      Isolated brown or white defects of less than few tenths of millimeter depth can be successfully treated with microabrasion. However, for deeper enamel defects, a combination of various techniques such as microabrasion/macroabrasion along with bleaching or full or partial veneering are available. Template-assisted direct veneering technique helps for better separation and contouring of individual tooth through which composite resin can be applied directly to tooth structure and artistically sculpted. Frequently, the gingival hyperpigmentation is caused by excessive melanin deposits mainly located in the basal and suprabasal cell layers of the epithelium. Recently, laser ablation has been recognized as one of the most effective, pleasant, and reliable techniques. This article describes a conservative approach for a complete smile makeover of a patient with severe fluorosis and pigmented gingiva with the help of enamel microabrasion and template-assisted direct composite veneering followed by laser depigmentation of gingiva.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(2):323-325
      PubDate: Thu,10 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_36_18
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2018)
       
 
 
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