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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Contemporary Clinical Dentistry
  [4 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0976-237X
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Health consequences of poor oral health?

    • Authors: SG Damle
      Pages: 1 - 1
      Abstract: SG Damle
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):1-1

      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):1-1
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_106_18
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Adult rhabdomyoma of the tongue in a child: Report of a case and a
           literature appraisal

    • Authors: Neelam N Andrade, Trupti Gandhewar, Neha Aggarwal, Paul Mathai
      Pages: 2 - 4
      Abstract: Neelam N Andrade, Trupti Gandhewar, Neha Aggarwal, Paul Mathai
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):2-4
      Rhabdomyoma, by definition is a benign muscle tumour.. Rhabdomyomas constitute 2% of all myogenous neoplasms. This tumour is in incongruence with other benign soft tissue tumours, in that it is rarer than its malignant counterpart. They are broadly categorised as cardiac and extra-cardiac. Three different subtypes exists as 1) the adult type, 2) the fetal type and 3) the genital type, the adult type being the most common.[1] AR (Adult Rhabdomyoma) generally occurs in the 4th and 5th decade with a male predilection.[2] There have been very few presentations of this lesion in the paediatric age group. Here we present a case of lingual adult rhabdomyoma in an 11 year old girl.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):2-4
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_835_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Detection of Hepatitis C Virus RNA in blood and saliva of
           transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients diagnosed with Hepatitis C

    • Authors: Behzad Hooshmand, Seyed Moayed Alavian, Farnaz Kouhestani, Maryam Firouzmandi, Saeed Reza Motamedian
      Pages: 5 - 9
      Abstract: Behzad Hooshmand, Seyed Moayed Alavian, Farnaz Kouhestani, Maryam Firouzmandi, Saeed Reza Motamedian
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):5-9
      Background: The aim of the current study was to detect hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in blood and saliva of a population of patients with thalassemia who have HCV antibody in their serum. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, blood and saliva samples were collected and were analyzed with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of HCV RNA. In addition, liver-related blood tests were performed, and patients' medical history was recorded. Data were analyzed by independent samples t-test and Chi-square with a significant level of 0.05. Results: Overall, 62 adult patients (29 males and 33 females) were included. Most (87%) of the patients had major thalassemia and genotype 1a was the most common (42%) type. HCV RNA was detected in 71 and 16% of blood and saliva samples, respectively. HCV RNA was detected more in female patients (31%) (P = 0.003) and in intermediate thalassemia (50%) (P < 0.005). The mean age of the patients with positive saliva was almost 10 years older (P < 0.001), and the mean number of blood transfusion was fewer in positive saliva group (P = 0.037). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of saliva PCR was calculated to be 18%, 88%, 80%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusion: Saliva contained HCV RNA in 16% of the assessed population. The probability of detection of HCV RNA in saliva increased in older patients, less number of blood transfusions, females and intermediate thalassemia. Saliva RT-PCR demonstrated low sensitivity and high specificity with high positive predictive value in the assessed population.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):5-9
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_297_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of bond strength and load deflection rate of multi-stranded
           fixed retainer wires: An In-Vitro Study

    • Authors: Renu Sarah Samson, Eby Varghese, Eswara Uma, Pramod Redder Chandrappa
      Pages: 10 - 14
      Abstract: Renu Sarah Samson, Eby Varghese, Eswara Uma, Pramod Redder Chandrappa
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):10-14
      Background: Fixed orthodontic retainers must be well retained on the tooth surfaces, allow physiologic movement of teeth and exert minimal forces on the teeth to be retained. Previous studies analyzed the bond strength and amount of deflection caused due to the debonding force but not the magnitude of force needed for unit deformation. Aims: This study aims to evaluate and compare the bond strength and load deflection rate (LDR) of three different fixed retainer wires. Materials and Methods: The wires were divided into three Groups: A – three-stranded twisted ligature wire, B – Bond-A-Braid (Reliance Orthodontics), and C – three-stranded twisted lingual retainer wire (3M Unitek). Twenty models were prepared for each group with a passive 15 mm long lingual retainer wire bonded to two lower incisors. An occlusogingival force was applied to the wire until it debonded. For LDR, three-point bending test was done at 0.5 mm deflection. These forces were measured using a Universal Instron Testing Machine. Statistical Analysis: Mean bond strength/LDR and pairwise comparisons were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's honest significant difference post hoc test, respectively. Results: Group C exhibited the highest mean bond strength and LDR of 101.17N and 1.84N, respectively. The intergroup comparisons were all statistically significant. Conclusion: Compared to the other two wire types, Group C might be better retained on the teeth due to its higher bond strength. With its relatively higher LDR value, it may resist deformation from occlusal forces, thereby reducing inadvertent tooth movement and yet remain flexible enough to allow physiologic tooth movements.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):10-14
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_632_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Microphotographic assessment of enamel surface using self-etching primer
           and conventional phosphoric acid: An In vitro Study

    • Authors: Geetanjali Gandhi, J. P. S. Kalra, Amit Goyal, Atul Sharma
      Pages: 15 - 19
      Abstract: Geetanjali Gandhi, J. P. S. Kalra, Amit Goyal, Atul Sharma
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):15-19
      Introduction: Conventional acid-etching method irreversibly removes several microns of enamel surface and also involves many steps. Hence, a simplified technique that minimizes enamel loss, improves adhesion procedures, prevents saliva contamination, and saves chair time, thereby producing clinically useful bond strength, would be valuable. Aim: To assess and compare the bonding mechanism of a self-etching primer (SEP) to that of phosphoric acid on enamel of the human permanent teeth by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted premolars were randomly divided into two groups of fifteen teeth each – the control group I (phosphoric acid) and experimental group II (self-etching primer). Brackets were bonded using Transbond XT adhesive on the buccal surfaces of the teeth after etching and priming according to their respective protocols. The teeth were then sectioned and the samples were subjected to a protocol of demineralization cycles. After complete dissolution of dental tissues, the specimens were gold sputter coated and evaluated under SEM. Results: A characteristically uniform etch pattern was seen in the resin samples of the phosphoric acid/Transbond XT primer group, which revealed increased roughness and resin tags penetrating the demineralized enamel surface, whereas with Transbond Plus SEP, a regular resin tag distribution was observed which showed less magnitude when compared with the control group. Conclusion: From the study, it was concluded that Transbond Plus SEP produced an etch pattern which was more conservative than conventional phosphoric acid system.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):15-19
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_647_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Surface detail reproduction and dimensional stability of contemporary
           irreversible hydrocolloid alternatives after immediate and delayed pouring
           

    • Authors: Preethi Kusugal, Ritu Sunil Chourasiya, Zarir Ruttonji, Preeti Astagi, Ajay Kumar Nayak, Abhishekha Patil
      Pages: 20 - 25
      Abstract: Preethi Kusugal, Ritu Sunil Chourasiya, Zarir Ruttonji, Preeti Astagi, Ajay Kumar Nayak, Abhishekha Patil
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):20-25
      Purpose: To overcome the poor dimensional stability of irreversible hydrocolloids, alternative materials were introduced. The dimensional changes of these alternatives after delayed pouring are not well studied and documented in the literature. The purpose of the study is to evaluate and compare the surface detail reproduction and dimensional stability of two irreversible hydrocolloid alternatives with an extended-pour irreversible hydrocolloid at different time intervals. Materials and Methods: All testing were performed according to the ANSI/ADA specification number 18 for surface detail reproduction and specification number 19 for dimensional change. The test materials used in this study were newer irreversible hydrocolloid alternatives such as AlgiNot FS, Algin-X Ultra FS, and Kromopan 100 which is an extended pour irreversible hydrocolloid as control. The surface detail reproduction was evaluated using stereomicroscope. The dimensional change after storage period of 1 h, 24 h, and 120 h was assessed and compared between the test materials and control. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test. Results: Statistically significant results (P < 0.001) were seen when mean scores of the tested materials were compared with respect to reproduction of 22 μm line from the metal block. Kromopan 100 showed statistically significant differences between different time intervals (P < 0.001) and exhibited more dimensional change. Algin-X Ultra FS proved to be more accurate and dimensionally stable. Conclusions: Newer irreversible hydrocolloid alternative impression materials were more accurate in surface detail reproduction and exhibited minimal dimensional change after storage period of 1 h, 24 h, and 120 h than extended-pour irreversible hydrocolloid impression material.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):20-25
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_676_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Influence of infected root dentin on the bond strength of a self-adhesive
           resin cement

    • Authors: D&#233;bora Delai, Maybell Tedesco, Josiane de Almeida, Marcelo Carvalho Chain, Cleonice da Silveira Teixeira, Mara Cristina Santos Felippe, Wilson Tadeu Felippe
      Pages: 26 - 30
      Abstract: Débora Delai, Maybell Tedesco, Josiane de Almeida, Marcelo Carvalho Chain, Cleonice da Silveira Teixeira, Mara Cristina Santos Felippe, Wilson Tadeu Felippe
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):26-30
      Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the bond strength (BS) of a self-adhesive resin cement to the contaminated root dentin. Materials and Methods: The crown and apical third of twenty single-rooted teeth were removed. The root canals were flared and 1-mm-thick root sections were obtained. The sections were rinsed, dried, and sterilized. The control group (n=20) was composed of one section of each third, which remained immersed in sterile trypticase soy broth (TSB) for 2 months. The other sections comprised the experimental group (n = 40) and were immersed in a suspension of Enterococcus faecalis. The culture medium was changed at every 4 days for 2 months. The sections were rinsed with distilled water, dried, and the root canal space was fi lled with the self-adhesive resin cement RelyX™ U200. After 24 h, the push-out test was performed and the types of interface failure were observed on a stereo microscope. Statistical Analysis: Data were statistically analyzed by the nonparametric Mann–Whitney test (α=5%). Results: A significant reduction was observed in the BS of resin cement to the contaminated dentin compared to the healthy dentin, for both thirds analyzed (P < 0.05). The BS was signifi cantly greater at the cervical third compared to the middle third for specimens in the experimental group (P < 0.05). Adhesive and mixed failures were observed more frequently in specimens contaminated with E. faecalis. Conclusion: Bacterial contamination negatively infl uenced the BS of the self-adhesive resin cement to the root dentin, and there was a predominance of adhesive and mixed failures.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):26-30
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_683_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Prevalence and severity of temporomandibular disorders among the
           orthodontic patients using fonseca's questionnaire

    • Authors: Sandhya Jain, Sunny Chourse, Deshraj Jain
      Pages: 31 - 34
      Abstract: Sandhya Jain, Sunny Chourse, Deshraj Jain
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):31-34
      Objective: The purpose of the study is to determine the prevalence of TMDs among the 12-18 years and 19-30 years patient age group requiring orthodontic treatment by using the Fonseca's questionnaire. Material and Methods: A total of 390 patients who visited the orthodontic department for treatment were asked to fill Fonseca's questionnaire. The results were analyzed for both the age groups and the percentage values were compared between males and females, different types of malocclusion and presence of TMDs. Results: In the 12-18 years age group, around 18.75% of the males and 12.28% of the females were having some degree of TMJ dysfunction. In the 19-30 years age group, around 30.32% of the females were found to have some severity of TMJ dysfunction as opposed to 19.23% of males. In the 12-18 years age group, around 11% of Class I, 16% of Class II and 50% of class III patients were having some degree of temporomandibular dysfunction. In the 19-30 years age group, the results showed that around 24% of Class I and class II patients and 50% of Class III patients presented with some degree of TMD. In the 12-18 years age group around 15% and in the 19-30 years age group, around 25% of the patients presented with some degree of TMD ranging from mild, moderate to severe. Conclusion: The study concludes that significantly more number of females presented with TMDs as compared to males in the 19-30 years age group. As the age increases the presence of TMDs also increases because of the significant presence of TMDs in the 19-30 years age group as compared to 12-18 years age group.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):31-34
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_689_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Osteonecrosis of the jaw among patients receiving antiresorptive
           medication: A 4-year retrospective study at a tertiary cancer center,
           Kerala, India

    • Authors: Pramod S Sankar, SA Thilak, P Nayak, JP Tripathy, B Satheesan, AV Rajitha
      Pages: 35 - 40
      Abstract: Pramod S Sankar, SA Thilak, P Nayak, JP Tripathy, B Satheesan, AV Rajitha
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):35-40
      Purpose: Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a rare but complicated side effect of antiresorptive medications. The aim of the study is to evaluate the dental and drug-related factors related to ONJ among patients on these drugs at a tertiary cancer center, India. Methodology: A retrospective record review of patients who received antiresorptive medication at our center from 2011 to 2014 was done. The demographic factors, type, dosage, and duration of the medication and dental history were collected, and the data were entered an analyzed using Epidata software. Results: A higher incidence of ONJ (8.1%) was noted in our sample (n = 183). Dental intervention after zoledronic acid (ZA) administration showed a statistical significance (P < 0.001). No significance (P value) was noted with respect to sex (0.78), age (0.28), median duration (0.9), and median dosage (0.9) of ZA. Conclusion: Oro-dental screening and dental monitoring shall reduce the incidence of ONJ. Within the limitations of our study, no significant relation could be pointed toward the dosage and duration of the drug and development of ONJ.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):35-40
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_696_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Clinical evaluation of role of dual antiplatelet therapy on bleeding after
           dental extraction

    • Authors: Prashant Babaji, Yousef Rishal
      Pages: 41 - 44
      Abstract: Prashant Babaji, Yousef Rishal
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):41-44
      Aims and Objectives: Altered platelet function and increased bleeding time (BT) can occur with antiplatelet therapy. This study was conducted to evaluate the need for stoppage of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing dental extractions. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty patients indicated for dental extraction were grouped as Group I: Consisted of 75 patients on dual antiplatelet therapy and Group II: Consisted of 75 patients who have discontinued antiplatelet therapy 1 week before dental extraction. BT of all the participants was recorded before extraction procedures. Under local anesthesia, single molar tooth indicated for simple extraction was done in both the groups. Suturing along with pressure pack was done after extraction. BT after extraction was statistically checked between the groups after 1 h and 24 h using Chi-square test with P < 0.05. Results: Postoperatively, none of the patients in both the groups showed active bleeding 1 h and 24 h. No bleeding was seen in 73 patients in Group I and 78 patients in Group II after 24 h. Conclusion: This study concluded that there is no significant difference in BT in both the groups. Antiplatelet monotherapy or even antiplatelet dual therapy needs no alteration or stopped before minor oral surgical procedures. Most of the postoperative bleeding can be easily controlled by local hemostatic measures.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):41-44
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_702_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of antibacterial efficacy of fungal-derived silver
           nanoparticles against Enterococcus faecalis

    • Authors: Kiran Rahul Halkai, Jayashree A Mudda, Vasundhara Shivanna, Vandana Rathod, Rahul Halkai
      Pages: 45 - 48
      Abstract: Kiran Rahul Halkai, Jayashree A Mudda, Vasundhara Shivanna, Vandana Rathod, Rahul Halkai
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):45-48
      Background: The main objective of endodontic therapy is complete elimination and prevention of bacteria from the root canal system; however, it is difficult due to anatomical ramifications of root canal system and growing resistant microbes to available disinfectants. Therefore, to overcome this problem, newer antimicrobial agents have to be developed. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of fungal-derived biosynthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods: Freshly prepared silver nanoparticles using the endophytic fungi Fusarium semitectum, characterized by different techniques were used to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy against E. faecalis by agar well diffusion method measuring the zone of inhibition using different concentrations of nanoparticles (AgNPs) (A [20 μl], B [40 μl], C [60 μl], D [80 μl], and E [100 μl]), F (0.2% chlorhexidine [CHX]), G (2% CHX), H (ampicillin), and I (distilled water) were used as control groups. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey multiple comparison test was done. Results: AgNPs (100 ml) showed highest zone of inhibition 19.5 mm against E. faecalis. CHX (0.2%) 14.52 mm, CHX (2%) 20.02 mm, and ampicillin showed highest mean zone of inhibition 20.5 mm and distilled water showed no zone of inhibition. Results indicate no significant difference between E (100 μl), G (2% CHX), and H (ampicillin) (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Biosynthesized AgNPs exhibit efficient antibacterial activity against E. faecalis and therefore can be used as root canal irrigant or intracanal medicament for root canal disinfection.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):45-48
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_703_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Assessment of effect of age, gender, and dentoalveolar changes on
           mandibular morphology: A digital panoramic study

    • Authors: V Sairam, Gareema Raju Potturi, B Praveen, G Vikas
      Pages: 49 - 54
      Abstract: V Sairam, Gareema Raju Potturi, B Praveen, G Vikas
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):49-54
      Introduction: With progressive development in the growth and function of the jaws, changes are observed in size as well as shape of the mandible, which vary on the basis of age, gender, and dental status. The objective of this study was to evaluate and assess the morphological changes of the mandible, with varying age, gender, and dental status, using panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted using digital panoramic radiographs taken by Kodak 8000c digital panoramic and cephalometric system on 150 patients, comprising fifty edentulous individuals (above 50 years of age), fifty old dentate individuals (above 50 years of age), and fifty young dentate individuals (below 25 years of age). All the mandibular measurements (gonial angle, ramus length, condylar length (CL), ramus notch depth, and cortical bone thickness) were carried out using RadiAnt DICOM VIEWER 2.2.9 (32-bit) software. The measurements were then subjected to paired t-test, Tukey's multiple post hoc procedures, and multiple linear regression analysis. Results: Descriptive statistics for all the parameters on the right and left sides of the mandible in both males and females were analyzed. A statistical significance of P < 0.05 was observed for all the variables except one variable (CL). Conclusion: In the present study, all the variables showed increased measurements in males except gonial angle, which was found to be wider in females, indicating that women tend to get affected by varying dental statuses than men. Hence, the parameters used in this study may act as good indicators for the assessment of the effect of age, gender, and dental status on mandibular morphology.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):49-54
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_704_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Simvastatin effects on dental socket quality: A comparative study

    • Authors: Mehdi Sezavar, Behnam Bohlouli, Sareh Farhadi, Shiva Tabatabaee, Reza Latifi
      Pages: 55 - 59
      Abstract: Mehdi Sezavar, Behnam Bohlouli, Sareh Farhadi, Shiva Tabatabaee, Reza Latifi
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):55-59
      Background: The shrinkage of the alveolar ridge might be minimized by the ridge preservation stages and applied alloplasts, after tooth extraction. According to studies on statins, angiogenesis and osteogenesis are observed as a topical application of these drugs. Objectives: The aim of this study is to the application of simvastatin in terms of bone regeneration of the alveolar ridge after tooth extraction. Materials and Methods: This study assessed this issue through the split-mouth method which assessed 10 dental sockets filled with simvastatin and collagen and 10 others filled just by collagen postextraction. The histological process of bone samples was observed under light microscope after 2 months at the time of fixture insertion to evaluate live and dead bone, trabecular, amorphous, and nonosteoblastic. The statistical analysis was assessed using Mann–Whitney U-test and level of significance was considered <0.05. Results: Normal bone was detected in both groups. In simvastatin group, the percentages of vital bone, amorphous, and trabecular bone were more than the other group and the percentages of dead bone and nonosteoblastic were lower, although there was no significant difference in the results. Conclusion: Based on study results, simvastatin possibly can improve the quality of osteogenesis in the jaw bone; however, further studies are necessary to definitively result.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):55-59
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_719_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of surface quality of silicone impression materials after
           disinfection with ozone water: An In vitro Study

    • Authors: K Abinaya, B Muthu Kumar, SC Ahila
      Pages: 60 - 64
      Abstract: K Abinaya, B Muthu Kumar, SC Ahila
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):60-64
      Purpose: To compare and evaluate the surface quality of silicone impression materials after ozone water disinfection. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 samples were prepared on a stainless steel die (American Dental Association specification no. 19 and International Standard of Organization - 4823). The samples were divided into four groups; each group contains 15 samples. Group A as control, Group B, C, and D disinfected with 2% glutaraldehyde, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, and ozone water, respectively. The samples were made according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the samples were allowed to set in a thermostatically controlled water bath at 35°C ± 1°C and retrieved after 10 min. The surface qualities of the samples were measured in stereomicroscope with ×20 magnification. Results: The data obtained were analyzed using Chi-square test, and the “P” value was calculated. The results showed that there were no differences in the surface quality among the Groups A, C, and D for addition silicone putty and light body and medium body impression materials than the Group B. Conclusion: This study concluded that ozone water disinfection showed least changes when compared to 5.25%sodium hypochloride and 2% glutaraldehyde disinfection for addition silicone putty , light body and medium body impression materials.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):60-64
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_747_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • To evaluate the efficacy of topical propolis in the management of
           symptomatic oral lichen planus: A randomized controlled trial

    • Authors: Athira Joshy, Nagabhushana Doggalli, Karthikeya Patil, PK Kulkarni
      Pages: 65 - 71
      Abstract: Athira Joshy, Nagabhushana Doggalli, Karthikeya Patil, PK Kulkarni
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):65-71
      Introduction: Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic inflammatory, autoimmune, mucocutaneous disease of unknown etiology. The first line of treatment for oral LP (OLP) has been corticosteroids, but because of their adverse effects, alternative therapeutic approaches are being carried out, of which the recent natural alternative is propolis. Aim: This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of topical propolis in the management of OLP. Materials and Methods: The research group consisted of 27 patients diagnosed with symptomatic OLP, among which 15 patients were in the control group and the rest 12 were in the study group. The patients in the control group received triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% (topical application) while the patients in the study group received propolis gel. Both the groups were evaluated for pain and erythema at baseline (1st visit), first follow-up (7th day), and second follow-up (14th day) using numerical rating scale and modified oral mucositis index. Results: The patients in both the study and control groups showed a statistically significant reduction (P = 0.000 for the study group and P = 0.000 for the control group) in pain and erythema scores from baseline to second follow-up visit. However, on comparison of the reduction in pain and erythema scores between the two groups, the difference was found to be statistically insignificant (P = 0.255). Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and Cramer's V test were used. Conclusion: The topical propolis was found to be of comparative effectiveness with respect to triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% in the management of OLP.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):65-71
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_751_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Antimicrobial efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride and calcium hydroxide
           with and without a carrier: A broth dilution analysis

    • Authors: Vinaya Susan Varghese, Veerendra Uppin, Kishore Bhat, Madhu Pujar, Amruta B Hooli, Nirmal Kurian
      Pages: 72 - 76
      Abstract: Vinaya Susan Varghese, Veerendra Uppin, Kishore Bhat, Madhu Pujar, Amruta B Hooli, Nirmal Kurian
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):72-76
      Background: An efficient antimicrobial agent action is required for a predetermined time period for absolute elimination of root canal microbes. Till date, there is limited or no data on the antimicrobial effect of octenidine as an intracanal medicament with chitosan (CTS) as a carrier against Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis. Aim: The aim of this microbiological study was to compare the antimicrobial efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride (OHC) and calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) as intracanal medicaments, both independently and along with CTS as a carrier molecule against the common resistant endodontic pathogens. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 single-rooted anterior teeth were selected, root canal preparation was done, and teeth were divided into two groups and contaminated with C. albicans and E. faecalis, which were further divided into four test groups each according to intracanal medicaments used. CTS was used as a vehicle for OHC and Ca(OH)2and antimicrobial assessment was performed on day 2 and day 7 following broth dilution method. Dentine samples were collected after each time interval, and the number of colony-forming units was determined. Results: All four medicaments used in this study showed antifungal and antibacterial activity that diminished from day 2 to day 7. Group I (OHC alone) and Group IV (Ca[OH]2alone) showed significant antimicrobial activity against C. albicans and E. faecalis, respectively, than the other groups. Conclusion: A combination of OHC + CTS and Ca(OH)2+ CTS produced inferior results than that of the medicaments used alone.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):72-76
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_779_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Direct linear measurement of root dentin thickness and dentin volume
           changes with post space preparation: A cone-beam computed tomography study
           

    • Authors: Shoeb Yakub Shaikh, Safia Shoeb Shaikh
      Pages: 77 - 82
      Abstract: Shoeb Yakub Shaikh, Safia Shoeb Shaikh
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):77-82
      Aim: The purpose of the present study was direct linear measurement of dentin thickness and dentin volume changes for post space preparation with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Ten maxillary central incisors were scanned, before and after root canal and post space preparation, with Orthophos XG three-dimensional hybrid unit. Thirteen axial section scans of each tooth from orifice to apex and dentin thickness for buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal were measured using proprietary measuring tool and thereafter subjected to statistical analysis. Furthermore, dentin volume was evaluated using ITK-SNAP software. Results: There was statistically significant difference between the dentin thickness in pre- and postinstrumentation (paired t-test) and also between different groups (one-way ANOVA). In the shortest post length of 4.5mm the post space preparation resulted in 2.17% loss of hard tissue volume, where as 11mm longest post length post space preparation resulted in >40% loss of hard tissue volume. Conclusion: CBCT axial section scan for direct measurements of root dentin thickness can be guideline before and after post space preparation for selection of drill length and diameter.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):77-82
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_785_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Correlation between dentofacial esthetics and mental temperament: A
           clinical photographic analysis using visagism

    • Authors: Tanikonda Rambabu, Chava Gayatri, Girija S Sajjan, P Venkata Karteek Varma, Visinigiri Srikanth
      Pages: 83 - 87
      Abstract: Tanikonda Rambabu, Chava Gayatri, Girija S Sajjan, P Venkata Karteek Varma, Visinigiri Srikanth
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):83-87
      Background: “Visagism,” a proposed novel concept, makes it possible for the patients to express the desirable emotions and personality traits, through their smile. According to this concept, clinicians can design a smile that blends with the patient's physical appearance, personality, and desires. Aim: To establish a relation, if any, between the smile pattern (dentofacial esthetics determined by three parameters, i.e., tooth form, long axes of maxillary anterior teeth, and connection line between embrasure) and the personality traits (four mental temperaments) through the concept of visagism. Settings and Design: A total of 190 participants aged between 20 and 38 years from a dental college were selected for the study. Materials and Methods: The temperaments of the participants were identified using a self-reporting questionnaire. The photographs of frontal view of teeth in centric occlusion of the participants were captured, and their tooth forms, long axes, and embrasure lines were drawn using photograph editing software. The type of temperament obtained from the questionnaire for each participant was compared with that obtained from photographic evaluation. Statistical Analysis Used: The obtained data were statistically analyzed by applying Kappa statistics for kappa measure of agreement. Results: There was no agreement between temperaments derived through questionnaire and those temperaments obtained from the photographic analysis. Conclusion: Although the concept of combining the principles of smile design and mental temperaments through visagism is an appreciable idea, it lacks a practical approach to create a personalized smile for each patient by including mental temperaments at present stage.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):83-87
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_788_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Comparison of tentative radiographic working length with and without grid
           versus electronic apex locator

    • Authors: Tanikonda Rambabu, Visinigiri Srikanth, Girija S Sajjan, Sirisha Ganguru, Chava Gayatri, K Roja
      Pages: 88 - 91
      Abstract: Tanikonda Rambabu, Visinigiri Srikanth, Girija S Sajjan, Sirisha Ganguru, Chava Gayatri, K Roja
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):88-91
      The apical termination of obturation is the most important factor influencing the success of root canal treatment (RCT). Working length (WL) is the key element in achieving this. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the preoperative estimated WL with conventional radiograph and with grid radiograph, with reference to electronic apex locator (EAL) in single-rooted teeth. Settings and Design: Thirty permanent anterior teeth with complete root formation indicated for RCT were included in this study. Materials and Methods: Conventional radiograph (Group 1) and conventional radiograph with external grid (Group 2) were made before access opening. WL with EAL (Group 3) was determined after access opening. Statistical Analysis: The statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) version 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used to compare the WLs of three groups, and the statistical significance was considered to be P ≤ 0.05. ANOVA, post hoc test were made to measure the intergroup comparison, and Pearson correlation values were obtained. Results and Conclusion: The results of the study showed a higher correlation between grid WL and apex locator WL than conventional WL and apex locator WL. Preoperative metrics with radiographic grid along with the apex locator is a better measuring tool compared to the conventional radiographic WL in a single-rooted tooth.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):88-91
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_790_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Comparison of tumor necrosis Factor-α concentrations in gingival
           crevicular fluid between self-ligating and preadjusted edgewise appliances
           in the early leveling stage of orthodontic treatment

    • Authors: Agita Pramustika, Nurtami Soedarsono, Krisnawati, Retno Widayati
      Pages: 92 - 96
      Abstract: Agita Pramustika, Nurtami Soedarsono, Krisnawati, Retno Widayati
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):92-96
      Introduction: Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is an important proinflammatory cytokine that regulates the early phase of inflammation reaction during orthodontic tooth movement. The aim of the present study was to compare TNF-α concentrations in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) between preadjusted edgewise appliance (PEA) and self-ligating (SL) systems during the early leveling stage of orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients (aged 15–35 years) who participated in this study were divided into two experimental groups (PEA and SL) and control group (without orthodontic treatment). The GCF was taken at five sites in the maxilla anterior teeth from each participant just before bracket bonding and at 1, 24, and 168 h after the initiation of tooth movement. Cytokine levels were determined through ELISA. Results: The concentration of TNF-α was significantly higher in the experimental groups than in the control group at 24 h after force application. TNF-α levels were significantly decreased at 168 h after force application in the PEA group. Meanwhile, in the SL group, the level of TNF-α at 168 h was still increased, although there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: TNF-α concentration was increased at 1 h and 24 h after orthodontic force application in both the PEA and SL groups. In the PEA group, TNF-α concentration was significantly decreased at 168 h, meanwhile in the SL group, this value remained increased at this time point. The differences in TNF-α concentration between the PEA and SL groups may be caused by their different types of brackets, wires, and ligation methods.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):92-96
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_792_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • The Top 10 ethical challenges in dental practice in indian scenario:
           Dentist perspective

    • Authors: Vanishree M Kemparaj, Ganesh Shenoy Panchmal, Umashankar Gangadaraiah Kadalur
      Pages: 97 - 104
      Abstract: Vanishree M Kemparaj, Ganesh Shenoy Panchmal, Umashankar Gangadaraiah Kadalur
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):97-104
      Aim: This exploratory qualitative research is an attempt to assess the health care ethical challenges in dental practice in an Indian scenario. Methodology: Qualitative indepth interview was conducted on 20 dental professionals to assess the ethical challenges prevailing in dental practice in Indian scenario. After obtaining the responses the verbatims were categorized into categories and finally 36 themes emerged. Later from two group of 6 panellists each after conducting focus group discussion the themes of ethical issues occurring in dental practice were ranked based on order of significance impact on the practice, patient and society using Delphi method. Result: The top ten ethical challenges listed by the panellists are inadequate sterilization and waste management in dental clinics, poor knowledge and attitude towards ethics among our dental practitioners, in competence among dental professional, increase in cost of oral health service, poor informed consent process, requirement of consensus about the treatment procedures among dentists, Conflict in Advertising, clustering of dental clinics in urban areas, disagreement with treatment modalities among dentist and patient, poor medical record maintenance among our dental practitioners. Conclusion: The study attempts to bring the prevailing ethical challenges in oral health care practice in Indian scenario.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):97-104
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_802_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of Low-Level Laser Therapy on Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A
           Randomized Control Study

    • Authors: Guneet Guram, Rajesh Kumar Reddy, Anand M Dharamsi, Prabhu Mahin Syed Ismail, Samvit Mishra, M Dave Prakashkumar
      Pages: 105 - 109
      Abstract: Guneet Guram, Rajesh Kumar Reddy, Anand M Dharamsi, Prabhu Mahin Syed Ismail, Samvit Mishra, M Dave Prakashkumar
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):105-109
      Background: Fixed orthodontic treatment is time-consuming procedure. Pain is usually associated with orthodontic treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) duration and pain perception. Materials and Methods: This randomized double-blind splint-mouth controlled clinical study includes 20 (8 males and 12 females) orthodontic patients requiring bilateral canine retraction. Time taken for canine retraction with LLLT (Group A) over control (Group B) quadrant on the same patient was assessed along with pain experience using facial pain scale. The data were tabulated and statistically evaluated using SPSS 20 for windows (Microsoft, Chicago, IL, USA) and t-test with P < 0.05. The difference in pain was evaluated with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: There was no difference in values for age and sex of patient for tooth movement and pain (P > 0.05). There was statistically significant decrease in rate of canine retraction in Group A compared to Group B. There was statistically significant difference for maxillary and mandibular arches in Group A whereas it was not significant in Group B. Pain experience was statistically significant till 2nd day, and after 3rd day, it was not significant between the groups. Conclusion: LLLT can reduce the fixed OTM timing and pain experience.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):105-109
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_864_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Non-Hodgkin&#39;s lymphoma of the mandible in HIV patient - A Rare
           Case Report

    • Authors: Mahesh Neerupakam, Jacob Prakash, Sridevi Koduri, Thejasri Vishnubhatla
      Pages: 110 - 113
      Abstract: Mahesh Neerupakam, Jacob Prakash, Sridevi Koduri, Thejasri Vishnubhatla
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):110-113
      Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is a lymphatic system tumor originating from either B or T lymphocytes and shows a high malignant potential. In HIV-seropositive patients, NHL of head and neck is mainly found in Waldeyer's ring, oral mucosa, salivary glands, paranasal sinuses, and laryngeal tissue. Primary NHL rarely affects the bone. When the lesion affects the bones of the jaws, it is rare in the mandible when compared to the maxilla. In the reported cases, only 0.6% are found in the mandible. NHL of the mandible can be difficult to diagnose, and so the prime aim of the present case report is to establish appropriate diagnosis of one of such kinds. Clinically, they may imitate a dental infection with symptoms of pain and discomfort. A delay in diagnosis may lead to a poor prognosis. Herewith, we present a case of NHL on the lower-right mandible in a 40-year-old male. A correlation of clinical findings, radiological examination, and histopathological examination enabled us in early diagnosis and differentiating it from other similar conditions, thus aiding in initiation of prompt treatment.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):110-113
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_543_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Diode laser and periodontal regeneration-assisted management of implant
           complications in anterior maxilla

    • Authors: Sanjeev Kumar Salaria, Isha Sharma, Navjot Kaur Brar, Satwant Kaur
      Pages: 114 - 119
      Abstract: Sanjeev Kumar Salaria, Isha Sharma, Navjot Kaur Brar, Satwant Kaur
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):114-119
      Dental implant is being considered successful if the patient is pleased with both of its functional and esthetic outcome. As implant complications (such as peri-implantitis, inappropriate implant position, wrong angulation, and implant location too close to anatomical structures) have been frequently encountered in dental practice, therefore, thorough knowledge to manage such complications is the key prerequisite to prevent the failure of implant. The present case report discussed the etiology, diagnosis of early peri-implantitis, and periodontal abscess with their successful management through periodontal regeneration and diode laser-assisted therapy.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):114-119
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_626_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Prosthetic rehabilitation of hemimandibulectomy defect with removable
           partial denture prosthesis using an attachment-retained guiding flange

    • Authors: Sangeeta J Nair, IN Aparna, B Dhanasekar, Nayana Prabhu
      Pages: 120 - 122
      Abstract: Sangeeta J Nair, IN Aparna, B Dhanasekar, Nayana Prabhu
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):120-122
      The restoration of normal function and esthetics is often challenging in the prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with hemimandibulectomy defects due to unstable occlusion and mandibular deviation. The extensive period of time for completion of healing of the reconstructed mandible through reconstructive plastic surgery and/or implant-assisted prosthesis may compromise the masticatory function by causing delay in the fabrication of definitive prosthesis. This case report describes a novel technique for the construction of customized attachment-retained mandibular guiding flange prosthesis for immediate rectification of the frontal plane rotation occurring after hemimandibulectomy.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):120-122
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_730_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Gingival veneer used as prosthetic solution for esthetic-compromised
           malpositioned dental implant

    • Authors: Viviane Ankli, Francisco Ivison Rodrigues Limeira, Monica Yamauti, Tassiana Can&#231;ado Melo S&#225;
      Pages: 123 - 127
      Abstract: Viviane Ankli, Francisco Ivison Rodrigues Limeira, Monica Yamauti, Tassiana Cançado Melo Sá
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):123-127
      Implant therapy has become a common practice and esthetic demands have tremendously increased, especially in the replacement of anterior teeth in patients with a high lip line. This report presents a gingival veneer as a viable treatment modality to mask peri-implant marginal gingival defects. An impression of the upper arch was made and the gingival veneer was waxed, and clinical confirmation was obtained, followed by laboratory processing, finishing, and polishing. After installing, it adapted to the proximal niches and exhibited good stability. A gingival veneer can be a feasible alternative with excellent esthetic results, when indicated and correctly executed to mask possible defects in the peri-implant marginal gingiva associated with a malpositioned single dental implant.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):123-127
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_739_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Diagnosis, treatment planning, and full-mouth rehabilitation in a case of
           amelogenesis imperfecta

    • Authors: Mayuri Naik, Siddharth Bansal
      Pages: 128 - 131
      Abstract: Mayuri Naik, Siddharth Bansal
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):128-131
      Amelogenesis imperfecta is a genetic condition affecting the teeth resulting in aberrations of the structure and clinical appearance of enamel. The treatment of amelogenesis imperfecta involves a multidisciplinary treatment approach requiring a comprehensive examination, diagnosis, and effective treatment planning strategy along with satisfaction of patient-related factors. The clinical case described here involves judicious involvement of different disciplines to formulate a treatment plan best suitable to confirm with the patient's needs and expectations, at the same time maintaining the integrity and harmony of associated hard and soft tissues.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):128-131
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_787_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • An enigmatic clinical presentation of plasma cell granuloma of the oral
           cavity

    • Authors: Pravesh Kumar Jhingta, Kavita Mardi, Deepak Sharma, Vinay Kumar Bhardwaj, Ashu Bhardwaj, Nitin Saroch, Nishant Negi
      Pages: 132 - 136
      Abstract: Pravesh Kumar Jhingta, Kavita Mardi, Deepak Sharma, Vinay Kumar Bhardwaj, Ashu Bhardwaj, Nitin Saroch, Nishant Negi
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):132-136
      Plasma cell granuloma is a rare benign lesion characterized by the infiltration of plasma cells; primarily occurring in the lungs. It is also seen to occur in the brain, kidney stomach, heart, and so on but its intraoral occurrence is a rarity. This case report represents one of the uncommon locations in the oral cavity affected by plasma cell granuloma, its clinical and histological features, and establishes the differential diagnosis with other malignant or benign disease entities and planning the treatment accordingly. This report discusses the diagnostic enigma and the associated terminology of plasma cell granulomas and reinforces the need for performing biopsy and a histopathological or immune histochemical study, irrespective of the clinical features and clinical diagnosis of the lesion. In this case a 52-year-old female, presented with gingival enlargement in the mandibular anterior region, treated by excisional biopsy. Histological evaluation revealed plasma cell infiltrates in the connective tissue. The immune-histochemistry revealed kappa and lambda light chains with a polyclonal staining pattern, which confirmed the diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):132-136
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_816_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Endodontic management of radix entomolaris in second molar

    • Authors: Parupalli Karunakar, Umrana Faizuddin, Madanala Nagarjun, MS Ranga Reddy
      Pages: 137 - 139
      Abstract: Parupalli Karunakar, Umrana Faizuddin, Madanala Nagarjun, MS Ranga Reddy
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):137-139
      The presence of radix entomolaris (RE) in a mandibular first molar is a common occurrence, which accounts for 0.2%–32% of the population, but the presence of RE in a mandibular second molar is a rare occurrence in our ethnic group. This presence of additional root can lead to difficulties during endodontic treatment. A thorough knowledge of anatomy is necessary for the success of endodontic treatment. This article presents a review on clinical approach and a case series on the detection and management of RE on mandibular second molar. RE was identified using Same lingual opposite buccal (SLOB) technique with preoperative radiograph, modifying the access cavity preparation, locating the canals followed by cleaning, and shaping of canals with nickel-titanium instruments. Obturation was done with respective master cones and AH + resin sealer.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):137-139
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_821_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • PGI bracket positioner: A novel combination of reverse bracket tweezer and
           positioning gauze

    • Authors: Sombir Singh, Sanjeev Verma, Nameksh Raj Bhupali, Satinder Pal Singh
      Pages: 140 - 141
      Abstract: Sombir Singh, Sanjeev Verma, Nameksh Raj Bhupali, Satinder Pal Singh
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):140-141
      The accurate bracket positioning is essential for the expression of the bracket system that affects the treatment outcome considerably and is also essential for good functional occlusion as well as facial esthetics. The proper alignment cannot be achieved without proper bracket positioning. Thus, the brackets positioning devices are an integral part of orthodontic armamentarium. Here, we present a new innovation that provides a unique combination of reverse bracket tweezer and positioner and hence is very helpful in precise vertical positioning of brackets with increased efficiency.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):140-141
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_746_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Sleeve push technique: A novel method of space gaining

    • Authors: Sanjeev Verma, Nameksh Raj Bhupali, Deepak Kumar Gupta, Sombir Singh, Satinder Pal Singh
      Pages: 142 - 145
      Abstract: Sanjeev Verma, Nameksh Raj Bhupali, Deepak Kumar Gupta, Sombir Singh, Satinder Pal Singh
      Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):142-145
      Space gaining is frequently required in orthodontics. Multiple loops were initially used for space gaining and alignment. The most common used mechanics for space gaining is the use of nickel–titanium open coil springs. The disadvantage of nickel–titanium coil spring is that they cannot be used until the arches are well aligned to receive the stiffer stainless steel wires. Therefore, a new method of gaining space during initial alignment and leveling has been developed and named as sleeve push technique (SPT). The nickel–titanium wires, i.e. 0.012 inches and 0.014 inches along with archwire sleeve (protective tubing) can be used in a modified way to gain space along with alignment. This method helps in gaining space right from day 1 of treatment. The archwire sleeve and nickel–titanium wire in this new SPT act as a mutually synergistic combination and provide the orthodontist with a completely new technique for space opening.
      Citation: Contemporary Clinical Dentistry 2018 9(1):142-145
      PubDate: Tue,6 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_809_17
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
 
 
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