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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 429 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 429 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access  
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.127, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access  
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)

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Journal Cover
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.352
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 7  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0974-2069 - ISSN (Online) 0974-5149
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [429 journals]
  • Population-based treated prevalence, risk factors, and outcomes of
           bicuspid aortic valve in a pediatric Medicaid cohort

    • Authors: Avnish Tripathi, Yinding Wang, Jeanette M Jerrell
      Pages: 119 - 124
      Abstract: Avnish Tripathi, Yinding Wang, Jeanette M Jerrell
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):119-124
      Background: We investigated the treated prevalence of bicuspid aortic valve in a pediatric population with congenital heart disease and its incident complications.Materials and Methods: A 15-year retrospective data set was analyzed. Selection criteria included age ≤17 years, enrollees in the South Carolina State Medicaid program and diagnosed as having bicuspid aortic valve on one or more service visits.Results: The 15-year-treated prevalence of predominantly isolated bicuspid aortic valve was 2% (20/1000) of pediatric congenital heart disease cases, with a non-African American: African-American ratio of 3.5:1, and a male:female ratio of 1.6:1. Aortic stenosis (28.0%), ventricular septal defect (20.6%), and coarctation of the aorta (20.6%) were the most prevalent coexisting congenital heart lesions. Of the 378 bicuspid aortic valve cases examined, 10.3% received aortic valve repair/replacement, which was significantly more likely to be performed in children with diagnosed aortic stenosis (adjusted odds ratio = 12.90; 95% confidence interval = 5.66–29.44). Cohort outcomes over the study period indicated that 9.5% had diagnosed heart failure, but <1% had diagnosed supraventricular tachycardia, infective endocarditis, aneurysm, dissection, or death.Conclusions: The majority of isolated bicuspid aortic valve cases without aortic stenosis did not require surgical intervention. Outcomes for cases requiring repair/replacement were relatively benign.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):119-124
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_137_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Long-term outcome of coronary artery dilatation in Kawasaki disease

    • Authors: Najib Advani, Sudigdo Sastroasmoro, Teddy Ontoseno, Cuno SPM Uiterwaal
      Pages: 125 - 129
      Abstract: Najib Advani, Sudigdo Sastroasmoro, Teddy Ontoseno, Cuno SPM Uiterwaal
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):125-129
      Background: Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis syndrome with a high incidence of coronary aneurysms in untreated children. The majority of aneurysms resulting from KD are known to regress with time.Aims: This study aimed to determine the course and outcome of coronary artery dilatation in patients with KD and ascertain whether there are any differences in the outcomes in the different branches.Setting and Design: This is a retrospective cohort study of patients diagnosed with KD with midterm follow-up data.Methods: Serial echocardiography was performed in all KD patients with coronary dilatation for 1–10½ years. The Kaplan–Meier curve was used for statistical analysis.Results: There were 154 patients with coronary dilatation studied. The frequency of coronary dilatation in acute phase was 33.3% and decreased to 7.9% 6–8 weeks later. Each patient could have dilatations at more than one branch, so the total number of dilatations was 245. The median time needed for regression was 2.6 months (mean: 10.5 months) while the median of follow-up duration was 41 months (mean: 23 months). Small- and medium-sized dilatations had more favorable outcomes compared to the giant ones. Location of dilatation did not influence the outcome.Conclusions: The majority (77.4%) of small- and medium-sized dilatations regress within 2 years, but giant aneurysms tend to persist. The outcome of coronary dilatation is determined by the diameter and not by the location. Regression rate is faster in smaller dilatations. Left main coronary artery is the most frequent location for dilatation.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):125-129
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_172_16
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Simulation training improves team dynamics and performance in a
           low-resource cardiac intensive care unit

    • Authors: Sivaram Subaya Emani, Catherine K Allan, Tess Forster, Anna C Fisk, Christine Lagrasta, Bistra Zheleva, Peter Weinstock, Ravi R Thiagarajan
      Pages: 130 - 136
      Abstract: Sivaram Subaya Emani, Catherine K Allan, Tess Forster, Anna C Fisk, Christine Lagrasta, Bistra Zheleva, Peter Weinstock, Ravi R Thiagarajan
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):130-136
      Introduction: Although simulation training has been utilized quite extensively in highincome medical environments, its feasibility and effect on team performance in lowresource pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU) environments has not been demonstrated. We hypothesized that lowfidelity simulationbased crisis resource management training would lead to improvements in team performance in such settings.Methods: In this prospective observational study, the effect of simulation on team dynamics and performance was assessed in 23 healthcare providers in a pediatric CICU in Southeast Asia. A 5day training program was utilized consisting of various didactic sessions and simulation training exercises. Improvements in team dynamics were assessed using participant questionnaires, expert evaluations, and video analysis of time to intervention and frequency of closedloop communication.Results: In subjective questionnaires, participants noted significant (P < 0.05) improvement in team dynamics and performance over the training period. Video analysis revealed a decrease in time to intervention and significant (P < 0.05) increase in frequency of closedloop communication because of simulation training.Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of simulationbased training in improving team dynamics and performance in lowresource pediatric CICU environments, indicating its potential role in eliminating communication barriers in these settings.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):130-136
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_117_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Predictive efficacy of procalcitonin, platelets, and white blood cells for
           sepsis in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgeries who are admitted
           to intensive care units: Single-center experience

    • Authors: Jigar Surti, Imelda Jain, Komal Shah, Amit Mishra, Yogini Kandre, Pankaj Garg, Jatin Shah, Ashok Shah, Payal Tripathi
      Pages: 137 - 142
      Abstract: Jigar Surti, Imelda Jain, Komal Shah, Amit Mishra, Yogini Kandre, Pankaj Garg, Jatin Shah, Ashok Shah, Payal Tripathi
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):137-142
      Background: Sepsis is one of the major contributor of morbidity and mortality in pediatric cardiac surgeries.Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the predictive efficacy of total leukocyte counts (TC), platelet count (PC), and procalcitonin (PCT) for sepsis in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries who are admitted to the Intensive Care Unit.Materials and Methods: This prospective, single-center study included 300 neonates, infants, and pediatric patients who had undergone various open heart surgeries at our center from September 2014 to November 2015.Results: Overall, the incidence of sepsis was 14% in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgeries. TC of postoperative 48 h were significantly lower (11889.19 ± 5092.86 vs. 14583.22 ± 6562.96; P = 0.004) in septic patients. The low levels of platelets on postoperative 24 h and 72 h were observed in patients with sepsis as compared to patients without sepsis, whereas the levels of PCT at various time intervals (preoperative, postoperative - 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h) had shown no association with sepsis in the study population. Low PC (24 h) was the strongest predictor of sepsis showing an odds ratio of 1.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42–3.51; P = 0.001) and area under curve of 0.688 with 95% CI of 0.54–0.83 (P = 0.018).Conclusion: We may conclude that in Indian pediatric population platelet levels are highly associated with sepsis as compared to any other hematological parameter. The immediate postoperative level of platelet is the strongest predictor of sepsis and could be effectively used in the clinical settings.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):137-142
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_36_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Percutaneous balloon dilatation for congenital aortic stenosis during
           infancy: A 15-year single-center experience

    • Authors: Abdulraouf M Z Jijeh, Muna Ismail, Aisha Al-Bahanta, Ahmed Alomrani, Omar Tamimi
      Pages: 143 - 147
      Abstract: Abdulraouf M Z Jijeh, Muna Ismail, Aisha Al-Bahanta, Ahmed Alomrani, Omar Tamimi
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):143-147
      Background: Congenital aortic stenosis (AS) is a rare disease. Treatment options for newborns are challenging. Newborns may have higher reintervention rate and mortality.Objectives: The study aimed to identify the factors predictive of reintervention following balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) for AS during infancy.Methods: Retrospectively, between 2001 and 2016, echocardiography (echo) and cardiac catheterization data for infants with AS were analyzed, including follow-ups and reinterventions. Percentage reduction was defined as the ratio between the drop of aortic valve (AV) peak gradient and the baseline peak gradient.Results: Sixty infants were included and 48 were followed up. Sixteen (27%) patients were neonates. Peak-to-peak gradient at AV was 64 ± 27 mmHg, which was reduced to 27 ± 13 mmHg. Percentage reduction was 53% ±24%. Forty-nine (82%) patients had adequate results (residual AV gradient <35 mmHg). There was no significant aortic insufficiency (AI) before procedure, while 6 (10%) patients had increased AI immediately after BAV. Of 48 patients, 14 (29%) required an additional BAV. Of 48 patients, 8 (17%) required surgical interventions following BAV. Reintervention was associated more with small left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), high residual AV, and low percentage reduction. Mortality was 8.3%.Conclusions: BAV in infancy has a reasonable success rate (82%) with high rate of reintervention. Patent ductus arteriosus-dependent neonates carried the highest risk of mortality. Small LVOT, high AV residual gradient, and low percentage reduction resulted in more reinterventions.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):143-147
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_171_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Fetal cardiac arrhythmias: Current evidence

    • Authors: Nathalie Jeanne Bravo-Valenzuela, Luciane Alves Rocha, Luciano Marcondes Machado Nardozza, Edward Araujo J&#250;nior
      Pages: 148 - 163
      Abstract: Nathalie Jeanne Bravo-Valenzuela, Luciane Alves Rocha, Luciano Marcondes Machado Nardozza, Edward Araujo Júnior
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):148-163
      This article reviews important features for improving the diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias by ultrasound in prenatal cardiac screening and echocardiography. Transient fetal arrhythmias are more common than persistent fetal arrhythmias. However, persistent severe bradycardia and sustained tachycardia may cause fetal hydrops, preterm delivery, and higher perinatal morbidity and mortality. Hence, the diagnosis of these arrhythmias during the routine obstetric ultrasound, before the progression to hydrops, is crucial and represents a challenge that involves a team of specialists and subspecialists on fetal ultrasonography. The images in this review highlight normal cardiac rhythms as well as pathologic cases consistent with premature atrial and ventricular contractions, heart block, supraventricular tachycardia (VT), atrial flutter, and VT. In this review, the details of a variety of arrhythmias in fetuses were provided by M-mode and Doppler ultrasound/echocardiography with high-quality imaging, enhancing diagnostic accuracy. Moreover, an update on the intrauterine management and treatment of many arrhythmias is provided, focusing on improving outcomes to enable planned delivery and perinatal management.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):148-163
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_134_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Anatomy of the normal fetal heart: The basis for understanding fetal
           echocardiography

    • Authors: Beatriz Picazo-Angelin, Juan Ignacio Zabala-Arg&#252;elles, Robert H Anderson, Damian S&#225;nchez-Quintana
      Pages: 164 - 173
      Abstract: Beatriz Picazo-Angelin, Juan Ignacio Zabala-Argüelles, Robert H Anderson, Damian Sánchez-Quintana
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):164-173
      The rapid changes that have taken place in recent years in relation to techniques used to image the fetal heart have emphasized the need to have a detailed knowledge ofnormal cardiac anatomy. Without such knowledge, it is difficult, if not impossible, to recognize the multiple facets of congenital cardiac disease. From the inception of fetal echocardiographic screening, the importance of basic knowledge of cardiac anatomy has been well recognized. The current machines used for imaging, however, now make it possible potentially to recognize features not appreciated at the start of the specialty. So as to match the advances made in imaging, we have now revisited our understanding of normal cardiac anatomy in the mid-gestational fetus. This was made possible by our dissection of 10 fetal hearts, followed by production of addition histological sections that mimic the standard ultrasound views. The fetuses ranged in gestational age from between 20 and 28 weeks. We then correlated the obtained anatomic images with the corresponding ultrasonic images used in the standard fetal screening scan. We also interrogated the anatomic sections so as to clarify ongoing controversies regarding detailed features of the normal cardiac anatomy. We have been able to show that the views now obtained using current technology reveal many details of anatomy not always appreciated at earlier times. Knowledge of these features should now permit diagnosis of most congenital cardiac malformations. The anatomic-echocardiographic correlations additionally provide a valuable resource for both the understanding and teaching of fetal echocardiography.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):164-173
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_152_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Developing congenital heart surgery in India: The travails and triumphs of
           a pioneer

    • Authors: Rao R Ivatury
      Pages: 174 - 180
      Abstract: Rao R Ivatury
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):174-180
      Professor IM Rao, from All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, was a pioneering cardiac surgeon who, against overwhelming odds, developed congenital heart surgery in India. He made many contributions to the evolution of his specialty, spanning more than four decades and three countries. This is a brief report of his professional life and accomplishments.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):174-180
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_43_18
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Particle embolization of systemic-to-pulmonary collateral artery networks
           in congenital heart disease: Technique and special considerations

    • Authors: Sarosh P Batlivala, William E Briscoe, Makram R Ebeid
      Pages: 181 - 186
      Abstract: Sarosh P Batlivala, William E Briscoe, Makram R Ebeid
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):181-186
      Systemic-to-pulmonary artery collateral networks commonly develop in patients with single-ventricle physiology and chronic hypoxemia. Although these networks augment pulmonary blood flow, much of the flow is ineffective and contributes to cardiac volume loading. This volume loading can have detrimental effects, especially for single-ventricle patients. Some data suggest that occluding collaterals may improve outcomes after subsequent operations, especially when the volume of collateral flow is significant. Traditional practice has been to coil occlude the feeding vessel. We perform particle embolization of these collateral networks for two primary reasons. First, access to the feeding vessel is not blocked as collaterals may redevelop. Second, particles occlude the most distal connections. Thus, embolization with particles should be considered as an alternative to coil occluding the proximal feeding vessel.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):181-186
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_93_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Novel direct approach for placement of permanent transvenous pacing leads
           after Fontan procedure

    • Authors: Jess T Randall, Osamah T Aldoss, Ian H Law, Abhay A Divekar
      Pages: 187 - 190
      Abstract: Jess T Randall, Osamah T Aldoss, Ian H Law, Abhay A Divekar
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):187-190
      The need for transvenous pacing (patients who have exhausted epicardial options) after a Fontan-type operation has been recognized. Many novel strategies have been proposed, but currently, all of them require additional maneuvers or rerouting of the leads to the pacemaker pocket. In this report, we describe a novel direct approach to transvenous pacing after a Fontan-type operation from a standard, prepectoral approach.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):187-190
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_157_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Cardiac strangulation: An atypical complication from epicardial pacemaker
           leads in a newborn

    • Authors: Nabil Tahhan, Papa Salmane Ba, Khaled Hadeed, Yves Dulac, Fabio Cuttone, Bertrand Leobon
      Pages: 191 - 193
      Abstract: Nabil Tahhan, Papa Salmane Ba, Khaled Hadeed, Yves Dulac, Fabio Cuttone, Bertrand Leobon
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):191-193
      We report a rare and serious complication of cardiac strangulation arising from the implantation of epicardial pacing leads in a newborn. Patient's follow-up 9-month postsurgery revealed compression under the pulmonary valve annulus by a pacemaker lead, causing progressive stenosis of the right ventricular outflow tract. The epicardial leads were replaced to relieve compression, and stenosis of the right ventricular outflow tract was rectified. Pacemaker implantation in newborns is not without challenges; epicardial leads should be carefully positioned to avoid any compression of cardiac structures.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):191-193
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_175_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Congenital second-degree heart block and total anomalous pulmonary venous
           return associated with microduplication of 1q32.2

    • Authors: Surasak Puvabanditsin, Vidya Puthenpura, Seyni Gueye-Ndiaye, Michele Takyi, Adaora Madubuko, Lauren Walzer, Rajeev Mehta
      Pages: 194 - 196
      Abstract: Surasak Puvabanditsin, Vidya Puthenpura, Seyni Gueye-Ndiaye, Michele Takyi, Adaora Madubuko, Lauren Walzer, Rajeev Mehta
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):194-196
      We report a term female infant with congenital heart block and total anomalous of pulmonary venous return. The results of single nucleotide polymorphism oligonucleotide microarray analysis showed an interstitial duplication of approximately 818 Kb, which involved 11 genes, including the entire LAMB3 gene which is known to associate with cardiac conduction defect. Our report adds to the collective knowledge that the cardiac conduction defect is a clinical feature of chromosome 1q32.2 duplication.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):194-196
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_21_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Retroperitoneal paraganglioma in a patient with Fontan: The hypoxia
           connection

    • Authors: Shriprasad R Deshpande, Priyanka Patel, Neill Videlefsky, Dellys M Soler Rodriguez, Rene Romero, Matthew S Clifton
      Pages: 197 - 200
      Abstract: Shriprasad R Deshpande, Priyanka Patel, Neill Videlefsky, Dellys M Soler Rodriguez, Rene Romero, Matthew S Clifton
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):197-200
      Paragangliomas are rare neuroendocrine tumors where hypoxia-inducible factor plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. It has been suggested that patients with congenital heart disease, in particular, may have cellular environment and relative hypoxia favorable to the development of these neuroendocrine tumors. Here, we present a case of an 11-year-old child with hypoplastic left heart syndrome previously palliated with Fontan procedure, diagnosed with paraganglioma on surveillance imaging. We present the clinical course, intervention, and outcome as well as review the possible contributory mechanisms. As we continue to improve long-term survival for single ventricle patients, awareness of these tumors during surveillance may be warranted as timely intervention may lead to cure.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):197-200
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_172_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Three-dimensional printing in surgical planning: A case of aortopulmonary
           window with interrupted aortic arch

    • Authors: Ryan A Moore, William Jack Wallen, Kyle W Riggs, David LS Morales
      Pages: 201 - 203
      Abstract: Ryan A Moore, William Jack Wallen, Kyle W Riggs, David LS Morales
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):201-203
      Better anatomical understanding and conceptualization of complex congenital heart defects using three-dimensional (3D) printing may improve surgical planning, especially in rare defects. In this report, we utilized 3D printing to delineate the exact cardiac anatomy of a neonate with an aortopulmonary window associated with interrupted aortic arch to devise a novel approach to the repair.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):201-203
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_127_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Double-outlet left atrium: Successful repair of an extremely rare anomaly

    • Authors: Yasser Ahmad Bhat, Himanshu Pratap, Kulbhushan Singh Dagar, Neeraj Awasthy
      Pages: 204 - 206
      Abstract: Yasser Ahmad Bhat, Himanshu Pratap, Kulbhushan Singh Dagar, Neeraj Awasthy
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):204-206
      The clinical detail, echocardiographic features, angiographic evaluation, and surgical repair of double-outlet left atrium (LA) in a 2-year-old boy are discussed. In a solitus position and normally connected systemic and pulmonary venous drainage setting, the only outlet of the right atrium was a secundum atrial septal defect. The LA thus received the entire venous return and then drained into both ventricles through a common atrioventricular valve.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):204-206
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_136_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Eosinophilia to endomyocardial fibrosis: Documentation of a case

    • Authors: Dinkar Bhasin, Saurabh Kumar Gupta, Sudheer Arava, Shyam S Kothari
      Pages: 207 - 210
      Abstract: Dinkar Bhasin, Saurabh Kumar Gupta, Sudheer Arava, Shyam S Kothari
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):207-210
      Endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) is an important cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy in tropical countries. The etiopathogenesis of EMF remains obscure. The role of eosinophilia in the etiopathogenesis of EMF has been debated extensively, but remains unproven. Accordingly, we present a case wherein a patient with documented eosinophilia and heart failure at the age of three-and-a-half years presented with endomyocardial fibrosis at the age of nine years. Such documentation is important to highlight the central role of eosinophils in the pathogenesis of EMF.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):207-210
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_143_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Pulmonary artery-to-left atrial fistula discovered after the closure of
           atrial septal defect: A rare clinical scenario

    • Authors: Akshay Chauhan, Saket Agarwal, Utsav Gupta, Nayem Raja, Muhammad Abid Geelani, Vijay Trehan
      Pages: 211 - 213
      Abstract: Akshay Chauhan, Saket Agarwal, Utsav Gupta, Nayem Raja, Muhammad Abid Geelani, Vijay Trehan
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):211-213
      A case of the right pulmonary artery-to- left atrial fistula with atrial septal defect (ASD) is presented. The fistula was detected after the patient developed desaturation following surgical closure of the ASD. It was managed with a transcatheter (trans-RPA route) closure of the fistula using a 12-mm Amplatzer ventricular septal defect closure device.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):211-213
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_138_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Homocystinuria presenting as a calcified right atrial mass

    • Authors: Tahleel Altaf Shera, Naseer Ahmed Choh, Faiz Altaf Shera, Azher Maqbool Khan
      Pages: 214 - 216
      Abstract: Tahleel Altaf Shera, Naseer Ahmed Choh, Faiz Altaf Shera, Azher Maqbool Khan
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):214-216
      Homocystinuria is a genetic inborn error of metabolism due to the deficiency of cystathionine β-synthase resulting in increased serum homocysteine and methionine and decreased cysteine which predisposes affected individuals to arterial and venous thromboembolic phenomena. We present a case of homocystinuria who presented to us as a calcified right atrial mass during the evaluation for lower respiratory tract infection. Our case reveals an unusual mix of findings using imaging with multiple detector computed tomography and radiographs.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):214-216
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_174_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Cardiac involvement in hypereosinophilic syndrome

    • Authors: Mohamad Jihad Mansour, Malek Rahal, Elie Chammas, Omar Hamoui, Wael Aljaroudi
      Pages: 217 - 218
      Abstract: Mohamad Jihad Mansour, Malek Rahal, Elie Chammas, Omar Hamoui, Wael Aljaroudi
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):217-218
      A 9-year-old boy with hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) was referred for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging following an abnormal echocardiogram that showed a large mass layered on the inferolateral wall of the left ventricle, causing secondary severe mitral regurgitation. Cardiac involvement in HES usually affects the ventricular apex. In our case, CMR confirmed the presence of a large mural thrombus of 0.9 cm × 4.2 cm. This unusual cardiac involvement in HES was diagnosed in its intermediate thrombotic stage. CMR is very sensitive and specific in staging the disease. It explained the etiology of mitral regurgitation and guided therapy, especially when echocardiography was nonconclusive.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):217-218
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_168_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • T-wave alternans in long QT syndrome

    • Authors: Siddharth Narayan Gadage
      Pages: 219 - 221
      Abstract: Siddharth Narayan Gadage
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):219-221
      Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a congenital disorder characterized by prolongation of QT interval in the electrocardiogram (ECG) and a propensity to develop ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to syncope, cardiac arrest or sudden death. T-wave alternans (TWA), a phenomenon of beat-to-beat variability in the repolarization phase of the ventricles, has been closely associated with an increased risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmic events (VTE) and sudden cardiac death (SCD).
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):219-221
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_112_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Large nonapical right ventricular diverticulum in a patient with
           atrioventricular septal defect

    • Authors: Michael Weidenbach, Bardo Wannenmacher, Christian Paech, Robert Wagner
      Pages: 222 - 223
      Abstract: Michael Weidenbach, Bardo Wannenmacher, Christian Paech, Robert Wagner
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):222-223
      Congenital diveticula and aneurysm of the heart are rare and most often located at the apex of the left ventricle. They pose a significant risk for cardiac failure and arrhythmias. In contrast, nonapical diverticula of the right ventricle (RV) have a much more benign course. We present a child with Trisomy 21, atrioventricular septal defect, and large nonapical diverticulum of the RV that was neither addressed during surgery nor needed any medical treatment during 1-year follow-up.
      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):222-223
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_149_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Myocarditis following diphtheria, whole-cell pertussis, and tetanus toxoid
           vaccination in a young infant

    • Authors: Vivek Kumar, Navjyot Sidhu, Shuvendu Roy, K Gaurav
      Pages: 224 - 226
      Abstract: Vivek Kumar, Navjyot Sidhu, Shuvendu Roy, K Gaurav
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):224-226

      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):224-226
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_107_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Ivabradine for congenital junctional ectopic tachycardia in siblings

    • Authors: Shyam S Kothari, Bharath Raj Kidambi, Rajnish Juneja
      Pages: 226 - 228
      Abstract: Shyam S Kothari, Bharath Raj Kidambi, Rajnish Juneja
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):226-228

      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):226-228
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_25_18
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Transcatheter closure of large aortopulmonary window in a neonate

    • Authors: Girish R Sabnis, Hetan C Shah, Charan P Lanjewar, Sushma Malik, Prafulla G Kerkar
      Pages: 228 - 230
      Abstract: Girish R Sabnis, Hetan C Shah, Charan P Lanjewar, Sushma Malik, Prafulla G Kerkar
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):228-230

      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):228-230
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_158_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Is seeing believing: An obstructed bidirectional Glenn, that
           wasn&#39;t!

    • Authors: Himanshu Pratap, Neetu Vashisht, Neeraj Awasthy, Kulbhushan Singh Dagar
      Pages: 230 - 231
      Abstract: Himanshu Pratap, Neetu Vashisht, Neeraj Awasthy, Kulbhushan Singh Dagar
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):230-231

      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):230-231
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_173_17
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Normal reference ranges for cardiac valve cross-sectional areas in preterm
           infants

    • Authors: Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
      Pages: 232 - 232
      Abstract: Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
      Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):232-232

      Citation: Annals of Pediatric Cardiology 2018 11(2):232-232
      PubDate: Fri,4 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_15_18
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 2 (2018)
       
 
 
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