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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Medical Sciences
  [SJR: 0.207]   [H-I: 31]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0019-5359 - ISSN (Online) 0019-5359
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Depression: Why to talk?

    • Authors: Prakash Balkrishna Behere, Kanika Kumar, Aniruddh Prakash Behere
      Pages: 411 - 413
      Abstract: Prakash Balkrishna Behere, Kanika Kumar, Aniruddh Prakash Behere
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):411-413

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):411-413
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_295_17
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Do we need better hepatitis B vaccines?

    • Authors: Wolfram H Gerlich
      Pages: 414 - 419
      Abstract: Wolfram H Gerlich
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):414-419

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):414-419
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1852_16
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • When treating rheumatoid arthritis be vigilant for influenza (&
           pneumonia): Don't ignore, don't neglect

    • Authors: Arvind Chopra, Vaijayanti Lagoo Joshi
      Pages: 420 - 423
      Abstract: Arvind Chopra, Vaijayanti Lagoo Joshi
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):420-423

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):420-423
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_62_17
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Genital tuberculosis in females

    • Authors: G Angeline Grace, D Bella Devaleenal, Mohan Natrajan
      Pages: 425 - 436
      Abstract: G Angeline Grace, D Bella Devaleenal, Mohan Natrajan
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):425-436
      The morbidity and mortality due to tuberculosis (TB) is high worldwide, and the burden of disease among women is significant, especially in developing countries. Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli reach the genital tract primarily by haematogenous spread and dissemination from foci outside the genitalia with lungs as the common primary focus. Genital TB in females is a chronic disease with low-grade symptoms. The fallopian tubes are affected in almost all cases of genital TB, and along with endometrial involvement, it causes infertility in patients. Many women present with atypical symptoms which mimic other gynaecological conditions. A combination of investigations is needed to establish the diagnosis of female genital TB (FGTB). Multidrug anti-TB treatment is the mainstay of management and surgery may be required in advanced cases. Conception rates are low among infertile women with genital TB even after multidrug therapy for TB, and the risk of complications such as ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage is high. More research is needed on the changing trends in the prevalence and on the appropriate methods for diagnosis of FGTB.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):425-436
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1550_15
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C genetic variant& risk of
           schizophrenia: A meta-analysis

    • Authors: Vandana Rai, Upendra Yadav, Pradeep Kumar, Sushil K Yadav, Sanjay Gupta
      Pages: 437 - 447
      Abstract: Vandana Rai, Upendra Yadav, Pradeep Kumar, Sushil K Yadav, Sanjay Gupta
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):437-447
      Background & objectives: Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is an important enzyme of folate metabolism, whose role in schizophrenia is debatable. Numerous case-control studies have investigated the association of MTHFR A1298C polymorphism with schizophrenia, but results are controversial. The aim of the present study was to find the association between MTHFR A1298C gene polymorphism and schizophrenia.Methods: PubMed, Google Scholar, Science Direct and Springer link databases were searched for case-control association studies in which MTHFR A1298C polymorphism was investigated as a risk factor for schizophrenia. In all, 19 studies with 4049 cases and 5488 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95 per cent confidence intervals (CIs) were used as an association measure.Results: The results of meta-analysis reported a significant association between A1298C polymorphism and schizophrenia risk in overall comparisons in all genetic models (C vs. A: OR=1.13, 95% CI=1.01-1.27, P=0.02; CC vs. AA: OR=1.20, 95% CI=1.03-1.39, P=0.02; AC vs. AA: OR=1.13, 95% CI=1.03-1.23, P=0.009; AC+CC vs. AA: OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.02-1.24, P=0.002; CC vs. AA+AC: OR=1.17, 95% CI=1.01-1.35, P=0.04).Interpretation & conclusions: MTHFR A1298C polymorphism was found to be a risk factor for schizophrenia and might have played a significant role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):437-447
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_745_14
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Index-TB guidelines: Guidelines on extrapulmonary tuberculosis for India

    • Authors: Surendra K Sharma, H Ryan, Sunil Khaparde, KS Sachdeva, Achintya D Singh, Alladi Mohan, Rohit Sarin, CN Paramasivan, Prahlad Kumar, Neeraj Nischal, Saurav Khatiwada, Paul Garner, Prathap Tharyan
      Pages: 448 - 463
      Abstract: Surendra K Sharma, H Ryan, Sunil Khaparde, KS Sachdeva, Achintya D Singh, Alladi Mohan, Rohit Sarin, CN Paramasivan, Prahlad Kumar, Neeraj Nischal, Saurav Khatiwada, Paul Garner, Prathap Tharyan
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):448-463
      Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is frequently a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a common opportunistic infection in people living with HIV/AIDS and other immunocompromised states such as diabetes mellitus and malnutrition. There is a paucity of data from clinical trials in EPTB and most of the information regarding diagnosis and management is extrapolated from pulmonary TB. Further, there are no formal national or international guidelines on EPTB. To address these concerns, Indian EPTB guidelines were developed under the auspices of Central TB Division and Directorate of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. The objective was to provide guidance on uniform, evidence-informed practices for suspecting, diagnosing and managing EPTB at all levels of healthcare delivery. The guidelines describe agreed principles relevant to 10 key areas of EPTB which are complementary to the existing country standards of TB care and technical operational guidelines for pulmonary TB. These guidelines provide recommendations on three priority areas for EPTB: (i) use of Xpert MTB/RIF in diagnosis, (ii) use of adjunct corticosteroids in treatment, and (iii) duration of treatment. The guidelines were developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria, which were evidence based, and due consideration was given to various healthcare settings across India. Further, for those forms of EPTB in which evidence regarding best practice was lacking, clinical practice points were developed by consensus on accumulated knowledge and experience of specialists who participated in the working groups. This would also reflect the needs of healthcare providers and develop a platform for future research.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):448-463
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1950_16
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Effect of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy on immune response
           to trivalent influenza vaccine in rheumatoid arthritis

    • Authors: Vikramraj K Jain, Nandhini Bhashini, L Karthik Balajee, Sujatha Sistla, Subhash Chandra Parija, Vir Singh Negi
      Pages: 464 - 470
      Abstract: Vikramraj K Jain, Nandhini Bhashini, L Karthik Balajee, Sujatha Sistla, Subhash Chandra Parija, Vir Singh Negi
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):464-470
      Background & objectives: Patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases may be at an increased risk of infection due to disease and use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy. The present study was done to evaluate the immune response to influenza vaccination in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Methods: Fifty one RA patients on stable methotrexate (MTX) therapy (≥15 mg/wk), 51 newly diagnosed DMARD-naïve RA patients and 45 healthy controls received a single dose of inactivated seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine. Blood samples were collected just prior to and four weeks after vaccination. Pre- and post-vaccination antibody titres against the three virus strains were measured by hemagglutination inhibition assay. The impact of age, gender, DMARD treatment and pre-vaccination seroprotection on response to the vaccine was assessed by binary logistic regression analysis for each of the virus strains.Results: Pre-vaccination antibody titres were found to be high in the three study groups for all influenza strains, except for Yamagata strain, the titres for which were low in healthy controls. Trivalent influenza vaccination was found to be safe and stimulated a good antibody response in all study groups. On regression analysis, there was no association of age, gender or MTX therapy with vaccine response, except for Yamagata strain where healthy controls had higher positive immune response (P=0.008; odds ratio – 3.37, 95% confidence interval: 1.36-8.32).Interpretation & conclusions: Our results indicated that influenza vaccination was safe in RA patients with no detrimental effect on disease activity. MTX therapy at a dose ≥15 mg/wk did not affect the vaccine response. Presence of high pre-vaccination seroprotective antibody levels in the study population indicates the need for re-examination of recommended annual influenza vaccination in such subgroups of population.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):464-470
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_920_15
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Spectrum of prenatally detected central nervous system malformations:
           Neural tube defects continue to be the leading foetal malformation

    • Authors: Anjurani Siddesh, Geetika Gupta, Ram Sharan, Meenal Agarwal, Shubha R Phadke
      Pages: 471 - 478
      Abstract: Anjurani Siddesh, Geetika Gupta, Ram Sharan, Meenal Agarwal, Shubha R Phadke
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):471-478
      Background & objectives: Prenatal diagnosis of malformations is an important method of prevention and control of congenital anomalies with poor prognosis. Central nervous system (CNS) malformations amongst these are the most common. The information about the prevalence and spectrum of prenatally detected malformations is crucial for genetic counselling and policymaking for population-based preventive programmes. The objective of this study was to study the spectrum of prenatally detected CNS malformations and their association with chromosomal abnormalities and autopsy findings.Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in north India from January 2007 to December 2013. The details of cases with prenatally detected CNS malformations were collected and were related with the foetal chromosomal analysis and autopsy findings.Results: Amongst 6044 prenatal ultrasonographic examinations performed; 768 (12.7%) had structural malformations and 243 (31.6%) had CNS malformations. Neural tube defects (NTDs) accounted for 52.3 per cent of CNS malformations and 16.5 per cent of all malformations. The other major groups of prenatally detected CNS malformations were ventriculomegaly and midline anomalies. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 8.2 per cent of the 73 cases studied. Foetal autopsy findings were available for 48 foetuses. Foetal autopsy identified additional findings in eight foetuses and the aetiological diagnosis changed in two of them (4.2%).Interpretation & conclusions: Amongst prenatally detected malformations, CNS malformations were common. NTD, which largely is a preventable anomaly, continued to be the most common group. Moreover, 60 per cent of malformations were diagnosed after 20 weeks, posing legal issues. Chromosomal analysis and foetal autopsy are essential for genetic counselling based on aetiological diagnosis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):471-478
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1882_14
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Influence of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)
           reconstruction algorithm on diagnostic accuracy of parathyroid
           scintigraphy: Comparison of iterative reconstruction with filtered
           backprojection

    • Authors: Gonca Kara Gedik, Oktay Sari
      Pages: 479 - 487
      Abstract: Gonca Kara Gedik, Oktay Sari
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):479-487
      Background & objectives: Preoperative localization of parathyroid lesions is essential for improving the results in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the value of technetium-99m (Tc-99m) methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of iterative reconstruction (IR) and filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithms about localization of parathyroid lesions.Methods: Forty four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, in whom histopathological correlation could be performed, were included in the study. Dual-phase Tc-99m parathyroid scintigraphy was performed 20 and 120 min after injection of 740 MBq Tc-99m MIBI in all patients. Tomographic images were acquired 120 min after the administration of radiopharmaceutical. The SPECT data were evaluated using an IR as well as a FBP algorithm. In 23 of 44 patients, SPECT acquisitions were performed in 64×64 matrix; in the remaining 21 patients, tomographic data were collected in 128×128 matrix. The imaging results were compared with pathological findings and sensitivities of both reconstruction algorithms, and planar views were calculated.Results: Using planar MIBI scans, abnormal parathyroid glands were correctly localized in 75 per cent of the cases. Sensitivity increased to 77 per cent using SPECT with FBP and to 84 per cent with IR. When the sensitivities were calculated according to the acquisition matrix, these were 95 per cent (20/21) and 85 per cent (18/21) for IR and FBP, respectively in patients in whom 128×128 matrix was used. The sensitivities were lower in patients who were imaged with 64×64 matrix; these were calculated as 74 per cent (17/23) and 70 per cent (16/23) with IR and FBP, respectively.Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed that compared to planar scintigraphy, Tc-99m MIBI SPECT was more sensitive diagnostic modality in the detection of abnormal parathyroid tissues. Image quality and sensitivity may be improved further when larger matrices with IR are used instead of FBP algorithm.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):479-487
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_305_15
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Red cell alloimmunization & role of advanced immunohaematological
           support in liver transplantation

    • Authors: Raj Nath Makroo, Soma Agrawal, Mohit Chowdhry, Aakanksha Bhatia, Uday Kumar Thakur
      Pages: 488 - 491
      Abstract: Raj Nath Makroo, Soma Agrawal, Mohit Chowdhry, Aakanksha Bhatia, Uday Kumar Thakur
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):488-491
      Background & objectives: Transfusion support forms an integral part of liver transplantation programme. Advanced immunohaematology services are required to deal with complex serological problems that can complicate transfusion therapy in these patients. Here, we report on red cell alloimmunization and presence of alloimmunization in donors and patients undergoing liver transplantation in a tertiary care hospital in north India.Methods: Records of 1433 liver transplants performed from January 2009 to March 2015 were retrieved and reviewed. Antibody screening was performed both for liver donors, and recipients and antibody identification was performed for the screen-positive patients.Results: Of the 1433 liver recipients, 32 (2.3%) developed antibodies. Seventeen patients had one or more alloantibodies, five had autoantibodies with an underlying alloantibody and 10 had only autoantibodies in their plasma. The overall alloimmunization rate was 1.5 per cent with 25 alloantibodies identified in 22 patients. Anti-E was the most common specificity identified.Interpretation & conclusions: The presence of alloantibodies can complicate transfusion therapy in patients undergoing liver transplantation, who are already at a high risk of being heavily transfused owing to the nature of surgery and the haemostatic dysfunction from chronic liver disease. Therefore, screening for irregular red cell alloantibodies combined with a rational blood transfusion policy may be essential for these patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):488-491
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1974_15
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Identification of a novel homozygous mutation in transmembrane channel
           like 1 (TMC1) gene, one of the second-tier hearing loss genes after GJB2
           in India

    • Authors: Pawan Kumar Singh, Manju Ghosh, Shipra Sharma, Shivaram Shastri, Neerja Gupta, Madhumita Roy Chowdhury, Anuranjan Anand, Madhulika Kabra
      Pages: 492 - 497
      Abstract: Pawan Kumar Singh, Manju Ghosh, Shipra Sharma, Shivaram Shastri, Neerja Gupta, Madhumita Roy Chowdhury, Anuranjan Anand, Madhulika Kabra
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):492-497
      Background & objectives: Hearing impairment is a common and heterogeneous sensory disorder in humans. Among about 90 genes, which are known to be associated with hearing impairment, mutations in theGJB2 (gap junction protein beta 2) gene are the most prevalent in individuals with hereditary hearing loss. Contribution of the other deafness-causing genes is relatively poorly understood. Here, we present our findings on two families with transmembrane channel like 1 (TMC1) gene variants of the 47 families with nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL) studied.Methods: Forty seven families including 26 consanguineous families with at least two hearing impaired children and one normal hearing child and 21 non-consanguineous families having at least three hearing impaired children and one normal hearing child were enrolled for this study. Genetic linkage studies were carried out in 41 families that wereGJB2 (Connexin 26) negative. Seven polymorphic short tandem repeat markers at the DFNB7/11 locus were studied employing fluorescently labelled markers.Results: A novel homozygous missense mutation c.1283C>A (p.Ala428Asp) was identified co-segregating with hearing loss. This change results in substitution of a highly conserved polar alanine to a charged aspartic acid and is predicted to be deleterious. In addition, a previously reported nonsense mutation, p.R34X in TMC1, was found.Interpretation & conclusions: While mutations in TMC1 are not as common a cause of NSHL as those in GJB2, TMC1 should be considered for diagnostic investigations in cases of NSHL in GJB2-negative families.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):492-497
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_397_15
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Does endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy through clipping procedure have
           early effects on electrocardiographic parameters?

    • Authors: Fatih Candas, Zafer Isilak, Akin Yildizhan, Omer Uz, Murat Yalcin, Rauf Gorur, Turgut Isitmangil
      Pages: 498 - 502
      Abstract: Fatih Candas, Zafer Isilak, Akin Yildizhan, Omer Uz, Murat Yalcin, Rauf Gorur, Turgut Isitmangil
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):498-502
      Background & objectives: Hyperhidrosis is a pathologic condition of excessive sweating in amounts greater than physiologic needs. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is a globally accepted treatment modality for primary palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis. ETS also has distinctive effects on the heart, circulatory and respiratory systems. In this study early effects of ETS on electrocardiographic (ECG) parameters of hyperhidrosis patients were evaluated.Methods: Twelve-lead ECGs were performed on 72 patients who were free from cardiovascular, metabolic, neurological and pulmonary diseases and underwent planned ETS because of hyperhidrosis, before and after the procedure within the first 24 h. Heart rate (HR), PR, QT, corrected QT (QTc), QTc/Tpeak-Tend (TpTe) intervals, P-wave and QTc/TpTe dispersions were compared by ECG.Results: A total of 72 patients (24.1±6.0 yr, 17 female) were included in the study. The pre-operative HR of patients was significantly higher than post-operative HR of patients (73.8±12.8 vs. 68.1±12.6 beats/ min; P<0.001). The QTc dispersion (QTcd) durations of pre-operative patients were significantly longer than those of post-operative patients (51.5±6.3 vs. 44.9±5.6 msec; P<0.01). The TpTe dispersion value of pre-operative patients was significantly (P<0.001) higher than that of post-operative patients.Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed that ETS through clipping procedure had positive effects on the mechanisms of arrhythmia by reducing HR, QTcd, TpTe and TpTe dispersion parameters of ECG in early periods in hyperhidrosis patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):498-502
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1133_14
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Acute effects on cardiovascular oscillations during controlled slow yogic
           breathing

    • Authors: Om Lata Bhagat, Chhaya Kharya, Ashok Jaryal, Kishore Kumar Deepak
      Pages: 503 - 512
      Abstract: Om Lata Bhagat, Chhaya Kharya, Ashok Jaryal, Kishore Kumar Deepak
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):503-512
      Background & objectives: Breathing exercises are believed to modulate the cardiovascular oscillations in the body. To assess the validity of the assumption and understand the underlying mechanism, the key autonomic regulatory parameters such as heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure variability (BPV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) were recorded during controlled slow yogic breathing. Alternate nostril breathing (ANB) was selected as the yogic manoeuvre.Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers (age 30±3.8 yr) participated in the study. ANB was performed at a breathing frequency of 5 breaths per minute (bpm). In each participant, the electrocardiogram, respiratory movements, beat-to-beat BP and end-tidal carbon dioxide were recorded for five minutes each: before, during and after ANB. The records were analyzed for HRV, BPV and BRS.Results: During ANB, HRV analysis showed significant increase in the standard deviation of all NN intervals, low-frequency (LF) component, LF/HF (low frequency/high frequency) ratio and significant decrease in the HF component. BPV analysis showed a significant increase in total power in systolic BPV (SBPV), diastolic BPV (DBPV) and mean BPV. BRS analysis showed a significant increase in the total number of sequences in SBPV and DBPV and significant augmentation of α-LF and reduction in α-HF. The power spectrum showed a dominant peak in HRV at 0.08 Hz (LF component) similar to the respiratory frequency. The acute short-term change in circulatory control system declined immediately after the cessation of slow yogic breathing (ANB) and remained elevated in post-ANB stage as compared to the pre-ANB.Interpretation & conclusions: Significant increase in cardiovascular oscillations and baroreflex recruitments during-ANB suggested a dynamic interaction between respiratory and cardiovascular system. Enhanced phasic relationship with some delay indicated the complexity of the system. It indicated that respiratory and cardiovascular oscillations were coupled through multiple regulatory mechanisms, such as mechanical coupling, baroreflex and central cardiovascular control.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):503-512
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_830_15
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Ocular distribution of antioxidant enzyme paraoxonase & its alteration
           in cataractous lens & diabetic retina

    • Authors: Subramaniam Rajesh Bharathidevi, Kannadasan Anand Babu, Nishit Jain, Sivashanmugam Muthukumaran, Vetrivel Umashankar, J Biswas, Narayanasamy Angayarkanni
      Pages: 513 - 520
      Abstract: Subramaniam Rajesh Bharathidevi, Kannadasan Anand Babu, Nishit Jain, Sivashanmugam Muthukumaran, Vetrivel Umashankar, J Biswas, Narayanasamy Angayarkanni
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):513-520
      Background & objectives: The enzyme paraoxonase (PON), an antioxidant enzyme that has both arylesterase and thiolactonase activity, is well studied in cardiovascular diseases. Although a few studies have shown altered PON activity in ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, but the tissue-wise expression of PON in its three gene forms has not been studied. This study was conducted to see the ocular distribution of PON for any altered expression in ocular pathologies such as in cataract and diabetes mellitus.Methods: Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of the ocular tissues was done for localizing all three forms of the PON in the human donor eyeballs. The PON arylesterase (PON-AREase) and thiolactonase (PON-HCTLase) activities were determined by spectrophotometry in kinetic mode, and the mRNA expression of the PON genes (PON1-3) was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.Results: IHC showed the presence of both PON1 and 2 in all the ocular tissues and PON3 was seen only in retina. The mRNA expression analysis showed that PON2 and PON3 were present in all the tissues, whereas PON1 was seen only in ciliary and retina. Both the PON-AREase and PON-HCTLase activities were detected in all ocular tissues and was in the order of lens>retina>choroid>ciliary body>iris. The expression and activity were studied in cataractous lens and in diabetic retina of the donor eyes. A significant decrease in PON-AREase activity was seen in cataractous lens (P<0.05) but not in diabetic retina, and there was an increase in PON- HCTLase activity (P<0.05) only in diabetic retina. Bioinformatic studies and in vitro experiments indicated that advanced glycation end products (AGE) such as carboxymethyl -lysine might decrease the PON- AREase activity of the PON.Interpretation & conclusions: Distribution of PON enzyme and its activity in ocular tissues is reported here. The study revealed maximal PON activity in lens and retina, which are prone to higher oxidative stress. Differential activities of PON were observed in the lens and retinal tissues from cataractous and diabetic patients, respectively.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):513-520
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1284_14
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Health-related quality of life in Indian children: A community-based
           cross-sectional survey

    • Authors: Manu Raj, Abish Sudhakar, Rinku Roy, Bhavik Champaneri, Teena Mary Joy, Raman Krishna Kumar
      Pages: 521 - 529
      Abstract: Manu Raj, Abish Sudhakar, Rinku Roy, Bhavik Champaneri, Teena Mary Joy, Raman Krishna Kumar
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):521-529
      Background & objectives: There are limited data on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) related to Indian children. The objective of this study was to construct a generic HRQOL reference for children aged 2-18 yr from a community setting.Methods: The study was a community-based cross-sectional survey. A total of 719 children/adolescents in the age group of 2-18 yr were enrolled using stratified random cluster sampling. A total of 40 clusters (cluster size 18) were selected for the study. The data contained child self-report and parent proxy report from healthy children and their parents/caretakers. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 (PedsQL4.0) Generic Core Scale was used to collect HRQOL data. Questionnaires were self-administered for parents and children aged 8-18 yr. In the age group of five to seven years, parents assisted the children in filling questionnaires.Results: The mean HRQOL total scores from child self-report and parent proxy report were 87.50±11.10 and 90.10±9.50 respectively, for children aged 2-18 yr. Social functioning had the highest scores and emotional functioning had the lowest scores for the entire sample and subgroups. The mean values for HRQOL in the current study were significantly different from the reference study for both child (87.39 vs. 83.91, P<0.001) and parent proxy reports (90.03 vs. 82.29, P<0.001) when compared between children aged 2-16 yr.Interpretation & conclusions: The study provided reference values for HRQOL in healthy children and adolescents from Kerala, India, that appeared to be different from existing international reference. Similar studies need to be done in different parts of India to generate a country-specific HRQOL reference for Indian children.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):521-529
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_447_16
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Food significantly reduces plasma concentrations of first-line
           anti-tuberculosis drugs

    • Authors: Agibothu Kupparam Hemanth Kumar, Vedachalam Chandrasekaran, Angadi Kiran Kumar, M Kawaskar, J Lavanya, Soumya Swaminathan, Geetha Ramachandran
      Pages: 530 - 535
      Abstract: Agibothu Kupparam Hemanth Kumar, Vedachalam Chandrasekaran, Angadi Kiran Kumar, M Kawaskar, J Lavanya, Soumya Swaminathan, Geetha Ramachandran
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):530-535
      Background & objectives: Concomitant feeding and anti-tuberculosis (TB) drug administration are likely to reduce nausea and enhance compliance to treatment. However, food could lower plasma drug concentrations. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of food on two-hour plasma concentrations of rifampicin (RMP), isoniazid (INH) and pyrazinamide (PZA), and pharmacokinetics of these drugs in adult TB patients.Methods: Newly diagnosed adult TB patients were recruited from the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) treatment centres in Chennai Corporation, Chennai, India. Two-hour post-dosing plasma concentrations were determined in 25 patients, and a semi-intensive pharmacokinetic study was undertaken in six patients. RMP, INH and PZA concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography.Results: The geometric mean two-hour concentrations with food and under fasting conditions were 2.2 and 5.5 μg/ml for RMP (P<0.001), 3.9 and 11.3 μg/ml for INH (P<0.001), and 18.0 and 28.2 μg/ml for PZA (P<0.001), respectively. Drug administration with food caused the plasma concentration to decrease by 50, 45 and 34 per cent for RMP, INH and PZA, respectively. Significant decreases in peak concentrations and exposures of drugs and delay in time to attain peak concentrations of drugs when taken with food were also observed.Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed that food lowered anti-TB drug concentrations significantly and delayed absorption. Patients may be explained the beneficial effects of taking anti-TB drugs in a fasting state and advised to do so. There is a need for more research on optimization of dosing to maximize efficacy and safety of currently used drugs.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):530-535
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_552_15
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Seroprevalence of transplacentally acquired measles antibodies in
           HIV-exposed versus HIV-unexposed infants at six months of age

    • Authors: Sneha Jain, Anju Seth, Shashi Khare, Jagdish Chandra
      Pages: 536 - 542
      Abstract: Sneha Jain, Anju Seth, Shashi Khare, Jagdish Chandra
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):536-542
      Background & objectives: Measles infection is reported to be more severe, prolonged and associated with a higher complication rate in children with HIV infection. Reports indicate that infants born to HIV-infected women [HIV exposed infants (HEI)] may be more vulnerable to measles. The World Health Organization recommends measles vaccination starting at six months of age in these infants who may be HIV-infected themselves. However, in India, they are given measles vaccination at nine months of age like all other infants. In this study, the seroprevalence of transplacentally acquired measles antibodies was compared in HEI and unexposed infants (HUnI) at six months of age and the proportion of HEI undergoing seroconversion after immunization with measles vaccine was assessed.Methods: In this prospective longitudinal study, measles IgG antibodies were estimated in serum of 49 HEI and 50 HUnI aged 6-7 months. Measles vaccine was then administered to HEI. Assessment for measles IgG antibodies was repeated 8-12 wk post-immunization.Results: Measles IgG antibodies were detected in two of 49 (4.1%) HEI and 16 of 50 (32%) HUnI. HEI were 11 times more likely to lack measles antibodies as compared to HUnI (odds ratio=11.05, 95% confidence interval=2.989-40.908). Post-vaccination, seroprevalence of measles antibodies increased to 38.5 per cent (P
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):536-542
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_44_16
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 in chronic hepatitis C:
           Correlations with insulin resistance, histological features &
           sustained virological response

    • Authors: Dana Crisan, Mircea Dan Grigorescu, Corina Radu, Alina Suciu, Mircea Grigorescu
      Pages: 543 - 550
      Abstract: Dana Crisan, Mircea Dan Grigorescu, Corina Radu, Alina Suciu, Mircea Grigorescu
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):543-550
      Background & objectives: One of the multiple factors contributing to virological response in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10). Its level reflects the status of interferon-stimulated genes, which in turn is associated with virological response to antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of serum IP-10 levels on sustained virological response (SVR) and the association of this parameter with insulin resistance (IR) and liver histology.Methods: Two hundred and three consecutive biopsy proven CHC patients were included in the study. Serum levels of IP-10 were determined using ELISA method. IR was evaluated by homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR). Histological features were assessed invasively by liver biopsy and noninvasively using FibroTest, ActiTest and SteatoTest. Predictive factors for SVR and their interrelations were assessed.Results: A cut-off value for IP-10 of 392 pg/ml was obtained to discriminate between responders and non-responders. SVR was obtained in 107 patients (52.70%). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for SVR was 0.875 with a sensitivity of 91.6 per cent, specificity 74.7 per cent, positive predictive value 80.3 per cent and negative predictive value 88.7 per cent. Higher values of IP-10 were associated with increasing stages of fibrosis (P<0.01) and higher grades of inflammation (P=0.02, P=0.07) assessed morphologically and noninvasively through FibroTest and ActiTest. Significant steatosis and IR were also associated with increased levels of IP-10 (P=0.01 and P=0.02). In multivariate analysis, IP-10 levels and fibrosis stages were independently associated with SVR.Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed that the assessment of serum IP-10 level could be a predictive factor for SVR and it was associated with fibrosis, necroinflammatory activity, significant steatosis and IR in patients with chronic HCV infection.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):543-550
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1410_14
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Typical & atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in diarrhoea
           & their role as carrier in children under five

    • Authors: Taru Singh, Shukla Das, VG Ramachandran, Dheeraj Shah, Rumpa Saha, Sajad Ahmad Dar, Arvind Rai
      Pages: 551 - 557
      Abstract: Taru Singh, Shukla Das, VG Ramachandran, Dheeraj Shah, Rumpa Saha, Sajad Ahmad Dar, Arvind Rai
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):551-557
      Background & objectives: Multidrug-resistant enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is responsible for a large number of cases of infantile diarrhoea in developing countries, causing failure in treatment with consequent health burden and resulting in a large number of deaths every year. This study was undertaken to determine the proportion of typical and atypical EPEC in under five children with diarrhoea and controls, their function as a carriage and to identify virulent genes associated with them.Methods: During the study period, 120 stool samples including 80 from controls children were collected and analyzed for the presence of EPEC using standard bacteriological methods. Isolates were subjected to antimicrobial testing by disc diffusion method. Isolates confirmed as E. coli by phenotypic method were further tested for the presence of attaching and effacing (eae) and bundle-forming pilus (bfpA) genes by real-time SYBR Green-based polymerase chain reaction.Results: All isolates were tested for the presence of EPEC. The frequency of typical EPEC was 20 and 16.25 per cent whereas the frequency of atypical EPEC strains was 5 and 23.75 per cent in patients and controls, respectively (P
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):551-557
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_25_15
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus in donors & opportunistic viral
           infections in liver transplant recipients

    • Authors: Joy Varghese, S Subramanian, Mettu Srinivas Reddy, Naresh Shanmugam, G Balajee, Vijaya Srinivasan, Jayanthi Venkataraman, Rela Mohamed
      Pages: 558 - 562
      Abstract: Joy Varghese, S Subramanian, Mettu Srinivas Reddy, Naresh Shanmugam, G Balajee, Vijaya Srinivasan, Jayanthi Venkataraman, Rela Mohamed
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):558-562
      Background & objectives: Opportunistic virus infections are common in liver transplant (LT) recipients. There is a risk of developing infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes-related viruses such as herpes simplex virus-1 and 2 (HSV-1 & 2), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Varicella Zoster virus (VZV), reactivation of infection and recurrent infection. This study was conducted to determine CMV seropositivity in donors and its influence on LT recipients and seropositivity of CMV, HSV-1 and 2, EB viral capsid antigen (EBVCA) and VZV in LT recipients and their reactivation.Methods: Pre-transplant data for IgG and IgM for CMV (and donor), HSV-1 and -2, EB viral capsid antigen (VCA) and VZV were available for 153 recipients. All recipients were on ganciclovir or valganciclovir prophylaxis for three months after LT. For reactivation rates, findings of post-transplant CMV quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (CMV qRT-PCR) assay were associated with pre-transplant serological profile.Results: Of the 153 LT recipients, 131 were men (85.6%). The median age of LT was 46 yr (range 9 months-71 yr). Overall exposure to CMV was 71.8 per cent followed by EB VCA (61.4%) and VZV (49.6%). Susceptibility to both HSV-1 and -2 was high across all decades (P<0.001). Seropositivity of CMV in donor was 90.9 per cent (100 out of 110). Post-transplant CMV qRT- PCR was positive in 17 (26.6%; 3 in recipient negative) of 64 samples tested. qRT-PCR assay was positive in one out of four (25%) tested for HSV-1 and nine out of 19 (47.4%) tested for EBV. Two recipients tested for HSV-2 and one for VZV were negative. There were three deaths in recipients (D+ R+) who were also positive for CMV qRT PCR. There was one death due to HSV-1 pneumonia. One patient with EBV reactivation developed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder two years after transplant.Interpretation & conclusions: Transplant recipient were at highest risk of acquiring HSV-1 and -2 more so for HSV-2. CMV exposure in transplant recipients and donors were very high and at greatest risk for recipient reactivation rate. Despite this, death related to CMV reactivation was low.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):558-562
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1024_14
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Heterologous expression of porcine elongase 6 (ELOVL6) gene in a human
           cell line

    • Authors: Saurabh Gupta, Lakshman Santra, Soumen Naskar, Sanjeev K Maurya, Mashidur Rana, Jyotirmoy Ghosh, Sujoy K Dhara
      Pages: 563 - 568
      Abstract: Saurabh Gupta, Lakshman Santra, Soumen Naskar, Sanjeev K Maurya, Mashidur Rana, Jyotirmoy Ghosh, Sujoy K Dhara
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):563-568

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):563-568
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_785_16
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Underutilization of antenatal services among tribal women

    • Authors: Manas Pratim Roy
      Pages: 569 - 569
      Abstract: Manas Pratim Roy
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):569-569

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):569-569
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1794_16
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Authors&#39; Response

    • Authors: Tulsi Adhikari, Damodar Sahu, Saritha Nair, Kalyan B Saha, Ravendra K Sharma, Arvind Pandey
      Pages: 570 - 570
      Abstract: Tulsi Adhikari, Damodar Sahu, Saritha Nair, Kalyan B Saha, Ravendra K Sharma, Arvind Pandey
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):570-570

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):570-570
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-5916.213722
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Choice of criterion used in the receiver operating characteristic analysis

    • Authors: Farrokh Habibzadeh, Parham Habibzadeh, Mahboobeh Yadollahie
      Pages: 571 - 572
      Abstract: Farrokh Habibzadeh, Parham Habibzadeh, Mahboobeh Yadollahie
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):571-572

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):571-572
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_2002_16
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Authors&#39; Response

    • Authors: Alladi Mohan, S Aparna Reddy, Alok Sachan, K.V.S. Sarma, D Prabath Kumar, Mahesh V Panchagnula, P.V.L.N. Srinivasa Rao, B Siddhartha Kumar, P Krishnaprasanthi
      Pages: 573 - 574
      Abstract: Alladi Mohan, S Aparna Reddy, Alok Sachan, K.V.S. Sarma, D Prabath Kumar, Mahesh V Panchagnula, P.V.L.N. Srinivasa Rao, B Siddhartha Kumar, P Krishnaprasanthi
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):573-574

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):573-574
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-5916.213767
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Freely moving right ventricular thrombus in a patient with acute pulmonary
           embolism

    • Authors: Kunal Mahajan, Prakash Chand Negi
      Pages: 575 - 575
      Abstract: Kunal Mahajan, Prakash Chand Negi
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):575-575

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):575-575
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_47_16
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Essentials of medical biochemistry: With clinical cases

    • Authors: Jyotsna Kailashiya, Avijit Mukherjee, Debabrata Dash
      Pages: 576 - 577
      Abstract: Jyotsna Kailashiya, Avijit Mukherjee, Debabrata Dash
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):576-577

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):576-577
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-5916.213764
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    • Authors: BS Ramakrishna
      Pages: 577 - 577
      Abstract: BS Ramakrishna
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):577-577

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):577-577
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-5916.213765
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Chronic kidney diseases &#8211; Recent advances in clinical and
           basic research

    • Authors: Vivekanand Jha
      Pages: 577 - 579
      Abstract: Vivekanand Jha
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):577-579

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2017 145(4):577-579
      PubDate: Mon,28 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-5916.213766
      Issue No: Vol. 145, No. 4 (2017)
       
 
 
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