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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 354 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine
  [SJR: 0.344]   [H-I: 9]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0253-7176
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [354 journals]
  • Immunoinflammatory therapies in psychiatry: Current evidence base

    • Authors: Vikas Menon, Shahul Ameen
      Pages: 721 - 726
      Abstract: Vikas Menon, Shahul Ameen
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):721-726

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):721-726
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_505_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Comprehensive management of autism: Current evidence

    • Authors: Manjiri Deshpande Shenoy, Vishal Indla, Harish Reddy
      Pages: 727 - 731
      Abstract: Manjiri Deshpande Shenoy, Vishal Indla, Harish Reddy
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):727-731
      Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and restricted repetitive behavior. The goals of treatment are to target core behaviors, improve social interactions and communication, and reduce disruptive behavior. The present paper discusses the role of applied behavioral analysis and pharmacotherapy.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):727-731
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_272_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Being a forensic psychiatrist in India: Responsibilities, difficulties,
           and criticalities

    • Authors: BC Malathesh, Soumitra Das
      Pages: 732 - 736
      Abstract: BC Malathesh, Soumitra Das
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):732-736
      Forensic psychiatry is in its infancy in India. There is a clear module or a well-structured training in the country except for recently opened few courses. Lack of trainer in the field might lead to compromised state when one has to take decision between the well-being of a person versus society. Starting from social contexts, such as marriage and mental illness, to the interpretation of criminal mind, there is a multitude of situations where forensic psychiatrist has a handful of jobs which suffer due to lack of infrastructure. In this article, we delineate the importance of a forensic psychiatrist in different civil as well as legal scenarios and difficulties often faced while handling it.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):732-736
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_334_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Validation of a screening tool for learning disorder in children

    • Authors: Varsha Vidyadharan, Harish M Tharayil, Biju George
      Pages: 737 - 740
      Abstract: Varsha Vidyadharan, Harish M Tharayil, Biju George
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):737-740
      Background: Learning disorder (LD) is a common cause for poor academic performance among school students. Poor detection of this may be due to lack of proper validated diagnostic and screening tools, leading to considerable difficulty for affected children and their families. This study aims to validate a screening tool developed by us among students with poor scholastic performance. It is an easy-to-use tool that can be used by parents or teachers. Preliminary validation was done earlier using case–control design among 100 students, and the results were encouraging. Materials and Methods: A tool with 26 items was applied in 365 schoolchildren with poor scholastic performance in Calicut district. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was done to find area under curve (AUC) and to obtain the sensitivity and specificity at the predefined cutoff score ≥10. Results: ROC analysis showed AUC of 0.93 for differentiating LD cases against the normal children. The optimum cutoff was taken as score ≥10 which has a sensitivity and specificity of 84.7% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: The new tool showed promising validity.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):737-740
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_29_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Anxiety and depression in irritable bowel syndrome

    • Authors: Arko Banerjee, Sujit Sarkhel, Rajib Sarkar, Gopal Krishna Dhali
      Pages: 741 - 745
      Abstract: Arko Banerjee, Sujit Sarkhel, Rajib Sarkar, Gopal Krishna Dhali
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):741-745
      Background: Psychological factors have been prominently implicated in the causation as well as maintenance of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Studies comparing psychiatric morbidity in IBS with healthy controls have reported contrasting findings. The current study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with IBS in comparison to healthy controls and to explore the relationship, if any, of anxiety and depression with various subtypes of IBS. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients of IBS (diagnosed as per Rome III criteria) between 18 and 65 years of age and fifty age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed for the presence of anxiety and depression using Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAMA) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD), respectively. Results: The patient group scored higher than controls (P < 0.001) in both HAMA and HAMD scores. The HAMA scores were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the severe IBS group compared to those with moderate IBS. HAMA scores predicted 25.6% (R2 = 0.256) of variance in IBS severity scores. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of HAMD scores. Conclusion: The high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities such as anxiety and depression in IBS samples in our study provides evidence in favor of proper screening for these disorders in gastrointestinal clinics. Recognition and treatment for these comorbidities can improve the quality of life as well as overall outcomes.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):741-745
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_46_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Stigma and attitudes toward patients with psychiatric illness among
           postgraduate Indian physicians

    • Authors: Susmita Chandramouleeswaran, Wesley Rajaleelan, Natasha Catherine Edwin, Ivan Koshy
      Pages: 746 - 749
      Abstract: Susmita Chandramouleeswaran, Wesley Rajaleelan, Natasha Catherine Edwin, Ivan Koshy
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):746-749
      Background: Due to paucity of psychiatrists in India, psychiatric patients often present to other doctors. We aimed to study nonpsychiatric residents' attitude and stigma toward psychiatric patients. Methods: A total of 57 postgraduate trainees participated in a cross-sectional study in a tertiary hospital in New Delhi. Attitudes to psychiatric patients were assessed using the attitude to mental illness questionnaire (AMIQ) and the perceived stigma questionnaire. This was correlated with sociodemographic information. Results: Over 70% residents accepted mentally ill patients as friends and felt they were equally employable. However, AMIQ demonstrated a negative attitude towards patients with schizophrenia. Perceived competence in dealing with psychiatric patients was associated with adequate undergraduate exposure (Chi-square = 7.270, P = 0.026) and correlated with positive attitudes (t-test, P = 0.0008). Conclusions: While the questionnaires revealed some prejudice toward psychiatric patients with schizophrenia, the postgraduate trainees who felt competent to deal with the mentally ill had the most positive attitudes toward them.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):746-749
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_84_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • First 2 years of experience of “residential care” at
           “sakalawara rehabilitation services,” National institute of
           mental health and neurosciences, Bengaluru, India

    • Authors: Narayana Manjunatha, Preeti Pansari Agarwal, Harihara N Shashidhara, Mohan Palakode, E Aravind Raj, Aruna Rose Mary Kapanee, Prashanthi Nattala, C Naveen Kumar, Paulomi Sudhir, Jagadisha Thirthalli, Srikala Bharath, Kasi Sekar, Mathew Varghese
      Pages: 750 - 755
      Abstract: Narayana Manjunatha, Preeti Pansari Agarwal, Harihara N Shashidhara, Mohan Palakode, E Aravind Raj, Aruna Rose Mary Kapanee, Prashanthi Nattala, C Naveen Kumar, Paulomi Sudhir, Jagadisha Thirthalli, Srikala Bharath, Kasi Sekar, Mathew Varghese
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):750-755
      Introduction: There is an unmet need for continuity-of-care is well known for those with severe mental disorders (SMDs) after acute care at hospitals in India. The “Sakalawara Rehabilitation Services (SRS)” functioned from March 2014 at “Sakalawara Community Mental Health Centre” (SCMHC) of “National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences,” Bengaluru, India in the concepts of residential care (half-way-home) with the aim to develop a replicable model.Aim: To review the inpatient records after the initial 2 years of experience in residential care at SCMHC. Methodology: Retrospective file review of inpatients at SCMHC from March 2014 to March 2016 in a semi-structured proforma designed for the study. Ethical committee of NIMHANS Bengaluru has approved the study. Results: The total number of inpatients during this period was 85. It was found that Schizophrenia spectrum disorders were the most common diagnosis among these patients. The activity of daily living and psycho-education were the most common individual interventions. The majority of families underwent structured family psycho-educational interventions. This review also demonstrated the feasibility of tele-aftercare in continuity of care after discharge of patients. Conclusion: SRS kind of residential set-up is feasible and demonstrated effectiveness in maintaining continuity of care of SMDs. There is a need for better structured and customized interventions. There is further a scope for tele (video) aftercare for those with SMDs.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):750-755
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_40_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • A clinical study of opioid substitution therapy in a tertiary care center
           of Eastern India

    • Authors: Satyakam Mohapatra, Mihir Ranjan Nayak, Manaswini Dash
      Pages: 756 - 759
      Abstract: Satyakam Mohapatra, Mihir Ranjan Nayak, Manaswini Dash
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):756-759
      Background: Opioid substitution therapy (OST) is an evidence-based intervention for opiate-dependent persons that replaces illicit drug use with medically prescribed, orally administered opiates such as buprenorphine and methadone. OST reduces HIV risk behaviors and harms associated with injecting opioid. Most of the evidence for OST effectiveness has been generated in middle- and high-income countries where programs are mostly located in dedicated health-care settings; evidence regarding the outcomes of OST programs in low-income countries where OST is often provided in grassroots settings such as drop-in centers is limited. Aims and Objectives: To study the sociodemographic variables, HIV ELISA status, HIV risk behavior, comorbid substance use pattern, and required dose of buprenorphine used for treatment of injection drug users (IDUs) attending oral substitution therapy (OST) center at a tertiary health care center. Methodology: A total of IDUs aged 18–60 years who attended the OST center during 1-year period at a government medical college are included in the study. Results: Majority of the IDUs are male with mean age of 32.8 years. The mean dose of buprenorphine used for the substitution was 4.6 mg/day at the start of therapy. Most of the IDUs are of lower educational status and educated up to primary or middle school. 32.50% of the participants who are unemployed are totally dependent on the family. Most common substance abuse among IDU users were tobacco (74.17%), followed by heroine (57.5%). High-risk behavior found among OST clients was unprotected sexual intercourse (19.17%), sharing needle (11.67%), and sexual intercourse with multiple partners (6.67%). HIV ELISA testing showed positive among 2 (1.67%). Conclusion: These findings have relevance to other parts of India and Asia, where injecting drug use is common and is a first step toward filling the gap in knowledge regarding the effectiveness of community-based OST programs delivered in resource-constrained settings.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):756-759
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_61_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Functional impairment and quality of life in patients with obsessive
           compulsive disorder

    • Authors: Puspita Sahoo, Rati Ranjan Sethy, Daya Ram
      Pages: 760 - 765
      Abstract: Puspita Sahoo, Rati Ranjan Sethy, Daya Ram
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):760-765
      Background: This study was carried out to enumerate the level of difference in functional impairment and quality of life (QOL) in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients and normal control group to find out the relationship among ICD functional impairment and QOL. Methodology: Thirty patients diagnosed with OCD as per International Classification of Diseases Diagnostic Criteria for Research-10 were taken for study. The control group consists of 30 normal participants from the community. Functional impairment and QOL questionnaires were administered on both groups to measure functional impairment and QOL in OCD. Results: The mean age of onset of OCD was (23.8 ± 7.25), mean duration of illness was (6.3 ± 4.47), and mean duration of treatment was (2.56 ± 2.47). It was also observed that total score as well as all the domains of the World Health Organization QOL-BREF, OCD patients scored significantly less (P < 0.001) compared to normal controls. Dysfunctional Analysis Questionnaire (DAQ)-Social area and DAQ-Personal area had statistically significant positive correlation (P < 0.05) with an obsessive subscale of Yale–Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) whereas DAQ-social area (P < 0.05), DAQ-Personal Area (P < 0.05) had statistically significant positive correlation with a total score of Y-BOCS. Conclusion: The presence of functional impairment leads to poor QOL in the persons with OCD.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):760-765
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_53_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of endocrine parameters as predictor of major depressive
           disorder

    • Authors: Soma Gupta, Amrita Mukherjee, Sangita Biswas, Smarajit Bose, Saswati Nath, Harendra Nath Das
      Pages: 766 - 769
      Abstract: Soma Gupta, Amrita Mukherjee, Sangita Biswas, Smarajit Bose, Saswati Nath, Harendra Nath Das
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):766-769
      Background: The diagnosis of the disease, major depressive disorder (MDD), entirely depends on the presence of some symptoms without any biochemical parameter to support it. Depletion of dopamine though is an established feature, is not the sole causative factor of MDD. Moreover, it has very little diagnostic value due to a short half-life. Other chemical messengers like hormones have also been found to get altered due to significant over activity of hypothalamo-pituitary axis. Literature review suggests that cortisol, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) are mostly altered in MDD, which can be utilized to diagnose the condition. Materials and Methods: A total of 101 patients suffering from MDD along with 106 age- and sex-matched controls were included in this study. Cortisol, TSH, and PRL were assayed in all the study participants by enzyme immunoassay. Student's t-test and linear discriminant analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: All the three hormones were found to be significantly high in cases with MDD. When applied for classification purpose, the errors in training group were found to be 15% and 15.74% from test set. None of the normal population was wrongly diagnosed as a patient of depression. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to evaluate multiple biochemical parameters as diagnostic marker of MDD. The study is in progress to find out a cutoff value of the responsible parameter so that they can be optimally used to diagnose a case of MDD.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):766-769
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_120_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Efficacy and tolerability of clozapine versus quetiapine in
           treatment-resistant schizophrenia

    • Authors: Mitesh Kumar, BS Chavan, Ajeet Sidana, Subhash Das
      Pages: 770 - 776
      Abstract: Mitesh Kumar, BS Chavan, Ajeet Sidana, Subhash Das
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):770-776
      Objectives: To compare the efficacy and tolerability of clozapine and quetiapine in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). Patients and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, open label study of 14 weeks, 53 patients with schizophrenia diagnosed as per ICD-10 and fulfilling the modified version of Conley and Kelly's criteria of TRS were randomly assigned to receive clozapine or quetiapine as per a computer-generated random table. After 2-weeks of dose-titration phase, doses were fixed at minimum therapeutic dose and subsequently adjusted according to the clinical improvement. All patients received dosage of respective drug in therapeutic range. 13 patients were lost to follow up. Treatment efficacy and side effects were evaluated with standardized rating scales. Results: Clozapine group (reduction in total score: mean=14.45, SD=10.39) had significantly greater reductions (P=0.004; CI=3.541-17.059) in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score, PANSS positive subscale and PANSS general psychopathology subscale at 14 weeks in comparison to the quetiapine group (reduction in total score: mean=4.15, SD=10.71). Significant reduction in PANSS negative subscale was seen with both drugs but no significant difference was present between the two drugs. At 14 weeks, 30% patients in clozapine group and 15% patients in quetiapine group showed response. Clozapine led to significantly greater side effects (P
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):770-776
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_111_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Caregiver burden in medical versus psychiatric patients: A cross-sectional
           comparative study

    • Authors: Anu Kant Mital, Sayali Ganesh Sabnis, Vrushali Vishal Kulkarni
      Pages: 777 - 784
      Abstract: Anu Kant Mital, Sayali Ganesh Sabnis, Vrushali Vishal Kulkarni
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):777-784
      Background: An informal care-giver is generally an unpaid individual who looks after the personal and medical needs of the patient. India being a country of traditions and family values, this informal care-giver is usually a family member. These care-givers, being untrained in this job undergo tremendous stress. Available research studies the burden individually in the relatives of chronically medically ill patients and those of psychiatrically ill patients. Furthermore the previous research targets the burden in individual diseases. This study stands out as it makes a comparison between the two broad groups, taking into account almost all possible chronic diseases in each group. Methods: This is a cross-sectional analytical descriptive study that was conducted on the family caregivers of chronically medically ill and psychiatrically ill patients, using the Caregiver's Burden Scale. Data were analyzed by SPSS 20 statistical software and Pearson correlation coefficient tests. Significant difference between area of caregiver burden of medicine and psychiatric patients was tested using relative deviate “Z” of SEDM test at 5% level of significance. Result: There is a significant difference between each category of Caregiver's Burden Scale among chronically medically ill and psychiatrically ill patients. (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The outcome of this study may help the health care providers in designing stress relief programs for primary care-givers. Overall this study may help better delivery systems of care for both the chronically medically ill as well as psychiatrically ill patients, by proper specific framing and psycho education programs for the caregivers of specific chronic illnesses.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):777-784
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_335_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Quality of the reviews submitted by attendees of a workshop on peer review

    • Authors: Samir Kumar Praharaj, Shahul Ameen
      Pages: 785 - 788
      Abstract: Samir Kumar Praharaj, Shahul Ameen
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):785-788
      Objective: The objective of the study was to study the methodological quality and error detection of the review by the participants of a peer review workshop. Methods: All participants of the workshop were invited to peer review a randomized controlled trial. The manuscript was E-mailed to them after introducing eight deliberate errors to it. Specific instructions and a deadline were provided. All the reviews were analyzed using review quality instrument (RQI). Furthermore, the rate and the type of errors identified were recorded. Results: Of 25 participants, 16 (64%) returned the reviews. The mean total score on RQI was 4.12 (standard deviation 0.70, 95% confidence interval 3.74–4.50); the items which most reviewers did not discuss where the importance of research question and originality of the paper. The number of errors correctly identified varied from 0 to 6 (median 3), the most common being a wrong conclusion (87.5%), randomization procedure (50%), written informed consent (50%), ethics committee approval (42.8%), and masking (31.2%). Only 5 (31.2%) gave an overall recommendation on whether the manuscript should be accepted or not. Conclusions: Major errors were readily identified by the reviewers; however, the need for training was felt in some areas in which the review quality was modest.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):785-788
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_372_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Prevalence and factors associated with depression among clinically stable
           people living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy

    • Authors: Sharanabasappa Algoodkar, Ajithkumar Kidangazhiathmana, PP Rejani, KS Shaji
      Pages: 789 - 793
      Abstract: Sharanabasappa Algoodkar, Ajithkumar Kidangazhiathmana, PP Rejani, KS Shaji
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):789-793
      Background: Individuals with HIV/AIDS are prone for psychiatric/psychological morbidities. Many studies have reported significantly higher prevalence of depression in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA's) when compared to general population. However, there are only very few studies looking at the prevalence of depression in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objectives: To estimate the prevalance and factors associated with depression among clinically stable PLWHAs. Materials and Methods: We used a cross-sectional study design to estimate the prevalence of depression and factors associated with it among clinically stable PLWHAs with CD4 cell count >400 cells/mm3 and on ART for >2 years. We assessed 100 PLWHAs and diagnosed depression using ICD-10 diagnostic criteria. Results: The prevalence of depression was 30% in this sample. Female gender, lack of family support, and HIV-positive status of the spouse were associated with depression in this study. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed lack of family support significantly associated with depression. High prevalence of depression and its association with stressful life circumstances even in individuals stable on ART points toward need for psychosocial interventions to improve metal health and well-being of these patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):789-793
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_364_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • A rare presentation of a case of obsessive–compulsive disorder
           comorbid with bipolar affective disorder

    • Authors: Nimmy Chandran, Arpit Parmar, Koushik Sinha Deb
      Pages: 794 - 796
      Abstract: Nimmy Chandran, Arpit Parmar, Koushik Sinha Deb
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):794-796
      Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic illness with waxing and waning course. OCD is not uncommonly found to be comorbid with bipolar affective disorder (BPAD). The course and prognosis of OCD have distinctive features in such cases. Only rarely symptoms of OCD emerge during mania in such individuals. We hereby report a very unusual case of OCD comorbid with BPAD in which obsession and compulsion symptoms occurred only during manic episodes with complete remission during periods between manic episodes (including during depressive episodes).
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):794-796
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.219655
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Rehabilitation in schizophrenia: A brain-behavior and psychosocial
           perspective

    • Authors: Jamuna Rajeswaran, Aarati Taksal, Sanjeev Jain
      Pages: 797 - 799
      Abstract: Jamuna Rajeswaran, Aarati Taksal, Sanjeev Jain
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):797-799
      Cognitive deficits in patients with schizophrenia have been documented consistently. They are known to contribute to functional impairment in patients. Cognitive remediation has been found to be beneficial in symptoms reduction and functional recovery. CH was a 26/F, completed her graduation, currently pursuing a management course through correspondence, unmarried, currently living with her parents, from Bengaluru, right-handed, Middle socio economic status (MSES). A diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia was referred for cognitive assessment and rehabilitation. Patient's cognitive assessment showed impairment in all the cognitive domains. She was given home-based and neurofeedback training along with family intervention. Significant improvement was seen in patients overall functioning.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):797-799
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.219648
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • A case report of gender dysphoria with morbid jealousy in a natal female

    • Authors: G Prasad Rao, B Aparna
      Pages: 800 - 802
      Abstract: G Prasad Rao, B Aparna
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):800-802
      Gender dysphoria is a new entity introduced in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder V to address the distress of the previously labeled gender identity disorder patients. It is less commonly seen in natal females, often starting in their childhood. Adults and adolescent natal females with early-onset gender dysphoria are almost always gynephilic. This case report is presented to discuss the interesting evolution of the symptoms in gender dysphoria case with difficulties in adjusting to the assigned sexual role, relationship problems, morbid jealousy, and severe depressive features with suicidal ideations.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):800-802
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.219643
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • A case of early onset subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presented as
           juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    • Authors: Ranjan Bhattacharyya, Bhaskar Mukherjee, Sumita Bhattacharyya
      Pages: 803 - 807
      Abstract: Ranjan Bhattacharyya, Bhaskar Mukherjee, Sumita Bhattacharyya
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):803-807
      A 7.5 years girl presented with myoclonic jerks with prolonged duration coming progressively at shorter intervals for last six moinths. There was declining academic performances. The dystonic, dyskinetic movements and ataxia were there for last three months. The stages were progressing too rapidly. IgG antibody titre to measles virus was found to be positive with EEG changes which confirms diagnosis. SSPE at so early age with atypical presentation is unique in this indexed case.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):803-807
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.219642
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Risperidone-induced erythema multiforme minor

    • Authors: Shreyas Shrikant Pendharkar, Shilpa Avinash Telgote, Amol Jadhav, Sachin Bhojne
      Pages: 808 - 810
      Abstract: Shreyas Shrikant Pendharkar, Shilpa Avinash Telgote, Amol Jadhav, Sachin Bhojne
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):808-810
      Antipsychotic agents are known to cause adverse cutaneous reactions. These are supposedly rare with atypical antipsychotic agents. Adverse dermatologic reactions due to antipsychotic agent risperidone are rarely reported. Here, we present a case of risperidone-induced erythema multiforme minor.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):808-810
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.219660
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Olanzapine-induced Psoriasis

    • Authors: Ashish Hanmantrao Chepure, Apurva Karmveer Ungratwar
      Pages: 811 - 812
      Abstract: Ashish Hanmantrao Chepure, Apurva Karmveer Ungratwar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):811-812
      Olanzapine is a second-generation antipsychotic drug mainly used in the treatment of schizophrenia. It has several side effects including weight gain, hypercholesterolemia, and hyperglycemia, but dermatological side effects are rarely reported. We report a rare case of olanzapine-induced psoriasis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):811-812
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_21_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Examining discrepancy between performance on traditional measures and
           parent report measure of executive functioning in autism spectrum disorder
           

    • Authors: Itisha Nagar, Ashum Gupta
      Pages: 813 - 816
      Abstract: Itisha Nagar, Ashum Gupta
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):813-816
      There is a growing concern amongst the researchers regarding the ecological validity of the neuropsychological tests used to assess EF in ASD. Traditional EF tests have been criticized for not being unable to tap real-life scenarios that are relevant to and representative of everyday behavior. The present study aimed to examine any potential discrepancy between performance on traditional measures of executive function and behavioural expressions of EF in case of an individual with High Functioning Autism (HFA). The findings highlight the importance of use of ecologically valid measures to gain a more valid assessment of executive functions.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):813-816
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_24_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The tale of the storyteller and the painter: The paradoxes in nature

    • Authors: Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra, Lakshminarayanapuram Gopal Viswanathan, Rahul Wahatule, Safal Shetty
      Pages: 817 - 820
      Abstract: Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra, Lakshminarayanapuram Gopal Viswanathan, Rahul Wahatule, Safal Shetty
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):817-820
      Introduction: Brain as the seat of behavior is acknowledged from the times of Charaka, however where neurology ends and philosophy begins remains an enigma. It is certainly every neurologist's observation that there is loss of function either region based or domain based in progressive diseases of the nervous system making it the seat of all useful activities. However, there are references to occurrence of new skills seen during various illnesses causing progressive cognitive dysfunction. This serves as a pharmaco-sparing agent in behavior management and therefore serves as a rehabilitatory tool. However, its pathomechanism is not clear. Patient and Methods: Two patients comprising one male and one female who were being evaluated for progressive cognitive dysfunction and were found to have interesting creative skills and are being described. Results: The first patient is a case of young onset behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and the second patient is a case of neurosarcoidosis. Conclusion: The emergence of these skills could be due to disinhibition of some of the innate skills of the patients during degeneration or establishment of new data linking circuits with creative potential during attempted repair.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):817-820
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_43_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Right-sided transcranial direct current stimulation and attentional
           salience of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia

    • Authors: Damodharan Dinakaran, Rujuta Parlikar, Vanteemar S Sreeraj, Anuradha Neikar, Sachin Nagendrappa, Venkataram Shivakumar, Ganesan Venkatasubramanian
      Pages: 821 - 822
      Abstract: Damodharan Dinakaran, Rujuta Parlikar, Vanteemar S Sreeraj, Anuradha Neikar, Sachin Nagendrappa, Venkataram Shivakumar, Ganesan Venkatasubramanian
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):821-822
      Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a safe, noninvasive technique demonstrated to reduce persistent auditory hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia. Here, we report the differential effect of tDCS on auditory hallucinations against other positive symptoms and also the use of right-sided tDCS in patients with increased attentional salience toward auditory hallucinations.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):821-822
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_44_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Schizophrenia with comorbid idiopathic parkinson's disease: A
           difficult clinical management scenario

    • Authors: Sandeep Grover, Swapnajeet Sahoo, Manoj Kumar Goyal
      Pages: 823 - 827
      Abstract: Sandeep Grover, Swapnajeet Sahoo, Manoj Kumar Goyal
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):823-827
      Comorbidity of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and schizophrenia is an uncommon and rare scenario, which often poses a difficult and challenging situation for management. Both the disorders have completely opposite pathophysiology and treatment of one disorder with available pharmacological agents can pose a threat to the other disorder. The situation becomes graver and risk of adverse side effects increases when an individual presents at a later age with both these disorders along with compromised physical and mental health. Of all the available psychopharmacological agents, clozapine has been found to be quite helpful for the management of psychosis without deterioration of existing movement problems of Parkinson's disease. In this case report, we present the case of a 60-year-old female with long-standing paranoid schizophrenia for the last 30 years, who later developed IPD and discuss the various management issues encountered during her treatment.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):823-827
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_68_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Clozapine-induced delayed ejaculation

    • Authors: Soumitra Das, Adesh Kumar Agrawal
      Pages: 828 - 828
      Abstract: Soumitra Das, Adesh Kumar Agrawal
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):828-828

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):828-828
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_157_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Twin registries: The neglected population resource

    • Authors: Deeksha Elwadhi, Prashant Gupta
      Pages: 829 - 830
      Abstract: Deeksha Elwadhi, Prashant Gupta
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):829-830

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):829-830
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_233_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Antipsychotics and OCD: Boon or Bane?

    • Authors: Ahmed Naguy
      Pages: 830 - 831
      Abstract: Ahmed Naguy
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):830-831

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):830-831
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_236_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Overestimation of depression prevalence among adolescent students

    • Authors: Samir Kumar Praharaj
      Pages: 831 - 833
      Abstract: Samir Kumar Praharaj
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):831-833

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):831-833
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_251_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Aggressive behavior and short–long polymorphisms of monoamine
           oxidase a: An example of effect of genetic molecular mass change in
           psychological medicine

    • Authors: Beuy Joob, Viroj Wiwanitkit
      Pages: 833 - 834
      Abstract: Beuy Joob, Viroj Wiwanitkit
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):833-834

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):833-834
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_247_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • If depression may be associated with future care seeking of
           activity-limiting low back pain, we must properly address the depression
           as well

    • Authors: Omar Viswanath
      Pages: 834 - 835
      Abstract: Omar Viswanath
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):834-835

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):834-835
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_362_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Successful use of risperidone, trihexyphenidyl, and paroxetine in
           pregnancy

    • Authors: Sandeep Kumar Goyal, Atul Goel
      Pages: 835 - 836
      Abstract: Sandeep Kumar Goyal, Atul Goel
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):835-836

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(6):835-836
      PubDate: Fri,1 Dec 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_380_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 6 (2017)
       
 
 
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