for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 429 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 429 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access  
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.127, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access  
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)

        1 2 3 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.368
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0253-7176
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [429 journals]
  • Financial aspect of indian suicides in 2015

    • Authors: Poduri Gopala Sarma
      Pages: 201 - 204
      Abstract: Poduri Gopala Sarma
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):201-204
      Background: There is an increasing need for cost computation of every aspect of human behavior for planning. Objective: This objective of the study was to compute the cost of suicide in India in 2015. Materials and Methods: Official data on suicides and life expectancy in 2015 formed the basis for computation of years of presumed life lost and total years of life lived (TYLL). Market rate and official estimates of various expenditures – pre- and post-suicide –formed the basis for loss and gain computation. The difference between income and expenditure formed the total cost. Results: A total of 133,623 persons committed suicide in 2015. They lost 4,349,158 years in total while living for slightly more period of 4,777,293 years. Postsuicide, the expenses were 152,233.8 trillion with a saving of 29,200 trillion. During the lifetime they lived, these people generated an income of 1,672,198 trillion and cost 320739.3 trillion. The net cost of suicide was ' 149,313.9 trillion. Conclusions: Although suicide cannot be prevented completely, much monetary loss can be minimized with adequate preventive tailor-made strategies.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):201-204
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_235_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Profile and outcome of near-hanging patients presenting to emergency
           department in a tertiary care hospital in South India – A
           retrospective descriptive study

    • Authors: Priya Ganesan, Moses Kirubairaj Amos Jegaraj, Sathish Kumar, Bijesh Yadav, Bagyalaksmi Selva, Reginald George Alex Tharmaraj
      Pages: 205 - 209
      Abstract: Priya Ganesan, Moses Kirubairaj Amos Jegaraj, Sathish Kumar, Bijesh Yadav, Bagyalaksmi Selva, Reginald George Alex Tharmaraj
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):205-209
      Background: Hanging is one of the common modes of deliberate self-harm presenting to emergency departments (EDs) across the world. Early intervention and aggressive resuscitation can decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with near-hanging. Our aim was to study the profile of patients presenting with near-hanging and their outcome to our adult ED. Materials and Methods: Medical records of patients with age more than 15 years presenting with near-hanging to the ED was reviewed retrospectively. The following profile data such as age, gender, marital status, material used for hanging, and type of hanging were collected. The information regarding the outcome of the patients from the hospital also analyzed. The data were analyzed to express the mean (±standard deviation) for the quantitative variables and frequency for the qualitative variables (±percent) using SPSS statistical software. Results: The analysis of 2 years data from August 2014 to July 2016 revealed 77 patients reached the ED with near-Hanging. The mean age of the patients − 31.1 years. Approximately, 43% were complete hanging, while rest were partial hanging. Majority of the patients used dressing materials for hanging themselves. Out of 77 patients, 64 were discharged alive while 2 patients died in the hospital and 11 were left against medical advice. Conclusions: Hanging is still a major mode of deliberate self-harm in South India both among men and women. The outcome of near-hanging is positively influenced by early admission and active treatment.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):205-209
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_282_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Managing bipolar affective disorder in a tribal District of Odisha

    • Authors: Dheeraj Kattula, Jayaprakash Russell Ravan, Munaf Babajan Nandyal
      Pages: 210 - 212
      Abstract: Dheeraj Kattula, Jayaprakash Russell Ravan, Munaf Babajan Nandyal
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):210-212
      Background: Managing any chronic illness in marginalized communities in resource-poor settings is always a challenge. Lack of facility to monitor lithium and the common morbidity of hypokalemic periodic paralysis and chronic renal failure among tribals of northern part of Odisha pose unique challenges in managing bipolar disorder. Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study done in a district-level hospital catering to predominantly tribal population. A part of the data was collected by a psychiatrist prospectively and analyzed. Historical data were obtained from medical records. Results: Out of 18 patients who had been diagnosed of bipolar/mania, 12 had received treatment with carbamazepine in the range of 400–600 mg. All but one person showed improvement. One person developed rash and had to stop the treatment. Conclusion: Carbamazepine may be used relatively safely in resource-poor settings in high-risk groups.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):210-212
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_477_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Neuropsychological functioning in euthymic phase of bipolar affective
           disorder

    • Authors: Priyanka Bhatia, Ajeet Sidana, Subhash Das, Manoj Kumar Bajaj
      Pages: 213 - 218
      Abstract: Priyanka Bhatia, Ajeet Sidana, Subhash Das, Manoj Kumar Bajaj
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):213-218
      Background: A substantial proportion of euthymic bipolar disorder patients have neuropsychological impairment which can have a significant impact on the overall functional recovery. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 bipolar disorder patients, currently in euthymic phase for the last 3 months with minimum duration of illness 2 years and current Young Mania Rating Scale <7 and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale <6, currently on medications were administrated various neuropsychological tests. Results: Approximately half of the patients have neuropsychological impairments in the areas of mental speed, sustained attention, verbal fluency, working memory, set shifting, verbal and visual memory, and visual-constructional ability. Conclusion: Findings of the current study provides evidence of neuropsychological impairment in euthymic bipolar disorder patients, and type of medications also has an impact on neuropsychological functions.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):213-218
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_531_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Two-Year follow-up of isolated epileptiform discharges in autism: An
           endophenotypic biomarker?

    • Authors: Vimal Doshi Veerappan, B Sweetha, HR Kavitha, B Sivalingam, Shanthi Nambi, Leema Pauline
      Pages: 219 - 224
      Abstract: Vimal Doshi Veerappan, B Sweetha, HR Kavitha, B Sivalingam, Shanthi Nambi, Leema Pauline
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):219-224
      Context: A significant subset of autistic children exhibit abnormal isolated epileptiform discharges (IEDs) in the absence of clinical epilepsy. The etiological significance of such IEDs is under much debate. Aims: The aim is to study the relationship between IEDs with risk factors, clinical severity, behavioral problems, and social-quotient and follow-up for the occurrence of new seizures. Settings and Design: This study was a prospective double-blind comparative study of autistic children with and without IEDs. Subjects and Methods: All autistic children attending Child Psychiatry Department of tertiary care postgraduate teaching hospital in April 2013 were included in the study. Electroencephalography, risk factors, and clinical severity were assessed. The same cohort of 72 children was followed for 2 years and reassessed. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent sample t-test, Chi-square test, Pearson correlation, and linear by linear association were the statistical methods used. Results: Twenty-four (42%) of the followed up sample exhibited IEDs. 10.52% had converted to clinical seizures within the follow-up period. While there was no difference between risk factors and age at diagnosis between the IED and non-IED groups, there was a significant difference between disease severity, behavioral problems and social quotient between the groups. Conclusions: IED in a subgroup of autistic children point to more severe illness, severe behavioral problems, and severe social impairment over a 2-year follow-up period. Can IED be considered a neurobehavioral endophenotype in autism?
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):219-224
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_555_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Prevalence of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders in
           obsessive-compulsive disorder

    • Authors: Mohammad Aleem Siddiqui, Daya Ram, Sanjay Kumar Munda, Shazia Veqar Siddiqui, Sujit Sarkhel
      Pages: 225 - 231
      Abstract: Mohammad Aleem Siddiqui, Daya Ram, Sanjay Kumar Munda, Shazia Veqar Siddiqui, Sujit Sarkhel
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):225-231
      Introduction: There is growing awareness of the heterogeneity of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and of the multiple systems involved in its pathogenesis. Identification of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSDs) may have important implications in the management and prognosis of OCD, but there is a paucity of research in the domain of identification of OCSD in probands with OCD. There are few studies that have examined OCSD in the first-degree relatives (FDR) of OCD patients, some of these were not controlled, and these studies have no final agreements over outcomes, and therefore, this area needs to be further explored. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of OCSDs in OCD probands; and its relationship to sociodemographic and clinical variables, comparing each aspect by a control group of schizophrenia probands. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients each of OCD and schizophrenia, diagnosed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV Text Revision,[1] above 18 years of age and giving informed consent, were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for OCSD, Yale–Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Rating Scale, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety. Results: In OCD group, 22 OCSDs were found in 11 subjects whereas in schizophrenia group, 2 OCSDs (self-injury) were found in two probands. When the two groups were compared in terms of individual OCSDs, there was no significant difference between them. However, when the comparison was made taking into account all OCSDs taken together, it was significantly higher (P = 0.016) in the OCD group compared to the schizophrenia group. Conclusion: OCSDs were significantly more in OCD probands as compared to schizophrenia probands. This suggests a familial aggregation of these disorders.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):225-231
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_556_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Stress and quality of life in cancer patients: Medical and psychological
           intervention

    • Authors: Prasad Vijay Barre, Gadiraju Padmaja, Suvashisa Rana, Tiamongla
      Pages: 232 - 238
      Abstract: Prasad Vijay Barre, Gadiraju Padmaja, Suvashisa Rana, Tiamongla
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):232-238
      Background: Cancer pervades many dimensions of an individual's life – demanding a holistic treatment approach. However, studies with combined medical and psychological interventions (MPIs) are sparse. High-level stress and poor quality of life (QoL) can hinder patients' prognosis. The study thus aimed to analyze the impact of combined medical and psychological (psychoeducation, relaxation technique–guided imagery, and cognitive therapy) interventions on stress and QoL of cancer patients – head and neck, breast, and lung cancers. Methods: The study was conducted in cancer hospitals employing one-group pretest-posttest-preexperimental design. Descriptive statistics, paired t-test, Cohen's d, and bar graphs were used to analyze the data. Results: Findings showed high impact of the combined MPIs in reducing both the overall stress as well as the various components of the stress scale-fear, psychosomatic complaints, information deficit, and everyday life restrictions. Significant changes were also seen in QoL and its domains – global health status, besides functional and symptom scales. Results showed a significant improvement in physical, role and emotional functioning scale, while decrement in fatigue, pain, insomnia, appetite loss, diarrhea, and constipation of symptoms scales. Conclusions: It can be concluded that combined MPI has a positive impact – decreasing stress and improving QoL in cancer patients, which can further enhance their prognosis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):232-238
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_512_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Anxiety, depression, and quality of life in women with polycystic ovarian
           syndrome

    • Authors: Aditi P Chaudhari, Kaustubh Mazumdar, Pooja Deepak Mehta
      Pages: 239 - 246
      Abstract: Aditi P Chaudhari, Kaustubh Mazumdar, Pooja Deepak Mehta
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):239-246
      Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder among women of reproductive age. Symptoms include amenorrhea, hirsutism, infertility, obesity, acne vulgaris, and androgenic alopecia. PCOS is a stigmatizing condition that affects a woman's identity, mental health and quality of life (QOL). This aspect has not received adequate attention in India. Aims and Objectives: (1) To study the prevalence of anxiety and depression among women suffering from PCOS (2) To determine if symptoms of PCOS were associated with psychiatric morbidity, and (3) To determine the impact of psychiatric morbidity on the QOL. Materials and Methods: Seventy females in the reproductive age group (18–45 years) diagnosed with PCOS as per Rotterdam criteria and without any preexisting psychiatric illness were clinically interviewed for anxiety and depressive disorders which were then rated according to the Hamilton scales. QOL was assessed using the World Health Organization-QOL-BREF. Binary logistic regression was performed to study the association of the symptoms with the psychiatric morbidity. QOL scores of patients with and without psychiatric morbidity were compared using Mann–Whitney U-test. Results and Conclusions: The prevalence of anxiety and depression in our sample was 38.6% and 25.7%, respectively. Infertility and alopecia were associated with anxiety, while acne was associated with depression. Hirsutism was associated with a lower psychological QOL. Patients with psychiatric morbidity had a significantly lower QOL than those without.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):239-246
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_561_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Sensory gating deficits and their clinical correlates in
           drug-free/drug-naive patients with schizophrenia

    • Authors: Ravichandra Karkal, Nishant Goyal, Sai Krishna Tikka, Roshan V Khanande, Anil Kakunje, Christoday R J Khess
      Pages: 247 - 256
      Abstract: Ravichandra Karkal, Nishant Goyal, Sai Krishna Tikka, Roshan V Khanande, Anil Kakunje, Christoday R J Khess
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):247-256
      Background: Sensory gating refers to “filtering” of irrelevant sensory input in the brain. Auditory sensory gating deficit has been considered as a marker of schizophrenia (SCZ) and assessed using P50 paired-click paradigm. We explore sensory gating deficits and their clinical correlates in SCZ. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five drug-free/drug-naïve patients with SCZ, whose psychopathology was assessed using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and 25 age-matched normal controls (NC) were recruited. ERP recordings were done using 40-channel event-related potential measuring system. Results: S2-S1 P50 amplitude difference, an index of sensory gating, was significantly lower in SCZ at F3 and F4 sites when compared to NC, indicating impaired gating. SCZ had significantly lower S1 amplitude compared to NC at these sites; S2 amplitudes were comparable. The sensory gating index also showed significant correlations with PANSS scores. Conclusions: Our study reiterates sensory gating abnormalities in SCZ and confers a frontal specificity, implying specific deficits in early preattentive processes to them. Further, we suggest that gating deficits in SCZ are driven predominantly by abnormally small S1 rather than an inability to suppress S2. A correlation between sensory gating parameters and measures of psychopathology strengthens the hypothesis that abnormal response to sensory input may contribute to the psychopathology in SCZ.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):247-256
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_53_18
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • A cross-sectional study on the proportion of anxiety and depression and
           determinants of quality of life in polycystic ovarian disease

    • Authors: Aparna Prathap, TP Subhalakshmi, P Joseph Varghese
      Pages: 257 - 262
      Abstract: Aparna Prathap, TP Subhalakshmi, P Joseph Varghese
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):257-262
      Background: The polycystic ovary syndrome is a disorder characterized by hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovarian morphologic features. Earlier studies have shown that depression was significantly increased in the polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) group and also that PCOD women had marked reduction in quality of life, impaired emotional well-being, and reduced sexual satisfaction. This study was undertaken with the objectives of studying the proportion of anxiety and depression and assessing the quality of life and its correlates in women with PCOD. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study on 64 PCOD patients using a pro forma for collecting sociodemographic and clinical details, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, Ferriman–Gallewey score for hirsutism and WHO-quality of life (QOL) BREF. Results: Depression was seen in 93.5% of the subjects and anxiety in 100% of the subjects. The patients were also seen to have a lower quality of life. Lower scores were obtained in the psychological domain (68.80 ± 12.87). Presence and severity of depression and anxiety were found to have a negative correlation with QOL in all domains but maximally affecting the social relationships domain (P ≤ 0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Severity of hirsutism and nulliparity was found to have association with QOL in the psychological domain. Conclusion: The majority of women with PCOD in this study were found to have depression and anxiety. They were also seen to have a lower quality of life. Depression, anxiety, and hirsutism were found to have a negative correlation with QOL in all domains.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):257-262
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_221_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Bowel and bladder anxiety: An obsession or a variant of
           agoraphobia?

    • Authors: Debjit Roy, Amrita Sarkar, Arvind Nongpiur, Manoj Prithviraj
      Pages: 263 - 265
      Abstract: Debjit Roy, Amrita Sarkar, Arvind Nongpiur, Manoj Prithviraj
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):263-265
      It has long been debated whether bowel and bladder anxiety are a part of obsessive compulsive spectrum disorder or a variant of agoraphobia with no consensus view yet. Tricyclic antidepressants are reportedly efficacious in such cases and lead to complete resolution of symptoms. Here, we report a 36-year-old male having urges to visit toilet when in public places or where toilets are not easily available and a resulting avoidance of such spaces fearing an episode of incontinence. Symptoms originated 16 years ago when he was in university which compelled him to drop out. We treated him with paroxetine and relaxation therapy to which he responded satisfactorily.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):263-265
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_133_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Sickness behavior and seasonal affective disorder: An immunological
           perspective of depression

    • Authors: Pooja Patnaik Kuppili, Nivedhitha Selvakumar, Vikas Menon
      Pages: 266 - 268
      Abstract: Pooja Patnaik Kuppili, Nivedhitha Selvakumar, Vikas Menon
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):266-268
      We describe a case of 45-year-old female suffering from chronic hepatitis B and bronchial asthma who presented with symptoms of seasonal affective disorder and sickness behavior. The case report illustrates syndromal and sub syndromal presentations of depression such as sickness behavior in support of “malaise theory of depression” from psychoneuroimmunological perspective. The current case depicts the complex interplay of inflammatory physical illness, medication and manifestations of depression in an individual case. Thus, the physicians and psychiatrists must be vigilant regarding the psychiatric manifestations of physical illness with immune-inflammatory component.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):266-268
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_232_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Snake venom use as a substitute for opioids: A case report and review of
           literature

    • Authors: Aseem Mehra, Debashish Basu, Sandeep Grover
      Pages: 269 - 271
      Abstract: Aseem Mehra, Debashish Basu, Sandeep Grover
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):269-271
      The mind-altering agents such as tobacco, cannabis, and opium have been widely used since the evolution of human being. These substances have been widely used for recreational purposes. However, derivatives from reptiles such as snakes, reptiles, and scorpions can also be used for recreational purposes and as a substitute for other substances. Their use is rare and related literature is very scanty. In this report, we present a case of snake venom abuse and review the existing literature.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):269-271
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_216_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Incubus syndrome: A case series and review of literature

    • Authors: Sandeep Grover, Aseem Mehra
      Pages: 272 - 275
      Abstract: Sandeep Grover, Aseem Mehra
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):272-275
      Incubus syndrome, characterized by delusional belief in female patients of being sexually approached by an unforeseen person, is rarely described in literature and description has been limited to isolated case reports. We describe four patients with schizophrenia, who reported the phenomenon of incubus and responded well to treatment with antipsychotics. A review of literature yielded five reports (describing six cases), most of which were described in the context of schizophrenia.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):272-275
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_218_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Successful management of patient with sheehan's syndrome presenting
           with psychosis and catatonia

    • Authors: Santanu Nath, Rajeev Ranjan, Debadatta Mohapatra, Biswa Ranjan Mishra
      Pages: 276 - 279
      Abstract: Santanu Nath, Rajeev Ranjan, Debadatta Mohapatra, Biswa Ranjan Mishra
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):276-279
      Sheehan's syndrome is a neuroendocrine condition that manifests with symptoms of hypopituitarism. It mostly occurs as a complication of parturition due to severe postpartum hemorrhage compromising pituitary circulation. Reports of neuropsychiatric manifestations of Sheehan's syndrome are available with most cases describing psychosis. We report an interesting case of Sheehan's syndrome which presented with catatonia on a psychotic background and its successful management. The possible pathophysiological underpinnings for the causation of catatonia and psychosis in this condition are also discussed.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):276-279
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_280_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • A case of whipple&#39;s disease: A very rare cause for rapidly
           progressive dementia

    • Authors: Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra, Pawan Raj, Anupama Ramakanth Pai, Neeraja Reddy
      Pages: 280 - 283
      Abstract: Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra, Pawan Raj, Anupama Ramakanth Pai, Neeraja Reddy
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):280-283
      Introduction: Whipple's disease (WD) is a very rare systemic disease caused by the gram-positive bacillus Tropherymawhippleii 1st described in the year 1907. It is a disease with multisystem involvement and high degree of suspicion is needed for diagnosis. However the classical (OMM)oculomasticatory (OFMM)oculofacial-skeletal myorhythmia clubbed with dementia, head ache and other neurologic features should deserve an attempt to confirm whenever possible and therapeutic trial as it is one of the treatable dementias. Males are more affected and probable route of infection is oral though clustering of cases is not reported so far. Case Report: 63 year old hypertensive patient presented with abdominal pain, weight loss, dementia, ataxia, extrapyramidal features, falls, up gaze palsy,oculomastigatory skeletal myorhythmia,skin of the face showing nodules which were pigmented and itchy fallowing HAJ pilgrimage.. Investigations for immune mediated,vasculitic,paraneoplastic, sarcoid were noncontributory. Duodenal biopsy showed nonspecific changes. MRI was consistent with changes reported in Whipples. Patient responded to treatment of Whipples disease. Discussion and Conclusion: Our patient presented with the typical and unique oculomastigatory myorhythmia clubbed with systemic features of whipplesdisese and showed response to treatment. Limitation of our report we could not do PCR due to lack of availability. This case is being reported for its rarity and to create awareness regarding the typical eye movements.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):280-283
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_149_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Diagnostic apraxia and ictal alien hand

    • Authors: Sadanandvalli Retnaswami Chandra, Karu Venkata Ravi Teja, Roopa Sheshadri
      Pages: 284 - 287
      Abstract: Sadanandvalli Retnaswami Chandra, Karu Venkata Ravi Teja, Roopa Sheshadri
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):284-287
      Alien hand is a strangely behaving hand and occurs in disease of medial frontal lobe and also corpus callosum. When it is with frontal lobe disease, it manifests as groping and hooking with either hand, but callosal lesions produce left-hand abnormalities of varying degrees. Occasionally this phenomenon can be transient as an ictal manifestation. Case 1 is a 20-year-old female who was on treatment for panic and anxiety for 4 years and later noticed strange action by the left hand pushing food plate and notebook when she is using them with the right hand. Case 2 is a 14-year-old boy who presented with episodes of strange situation where his left hand was pushing his right hand into his mouth, and he had no control over it. He bit his right-hand fingers, and on one episode, he was bleeding from his injured fingers, yet he felt someone is making his left hand do this. Both patients had a demonstrable structural lesion. Patients, when they have stereotyped strange behavior with limbs, need to be investigated for organic disease and initiate treatment accordingly.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):284-287
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_161_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Electroconvulsive therapy in an elderly patient with severe aortic
           stenosis: A case report and review of literature

    • Authors: Himanshu Singla, Sandeep Grover
      Pages: 288 - 291
      Abstract: Himanshu Singla, Sandeep Grover
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):288-291
      Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the safest treatment options for psychiatric illnesses with no absolute contraindications. However, certain medical conditions including cardiac ailments such as aortic stenosis are associated with increased risk with ECT. We present the case of a 74-year-old female who was suffering from severe depression with psychotic symptoms (which had not responded to two adequate trials of antidepressants), along with severe aortic stenosis, who was managed with modified bilateral ECT and review the available literature.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):288-291
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_152_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Evidence for stress-induced bleeding in a patient with von willebrand
           factor deficiency

    • Authors: Karthick Subramanian, Madhavapuri Pravallika, Vikas Menon
      Pages: 292 - 295
      Abstract: Karthick Subramanian, Madhavapuri Pravallika, Vikas Menon
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):292-295
      Literature reveals that psychological stress is related to hemostatic mechanisms and that excess stress can lead to prothrombotic events. Patients with chronic bleeding disorders report increased levels of subjective distress. The psychobiological link between stress and bleeding tendencies is rarely investigated when compared to the wealth of the studies on stress and clotting mechanisms. We present the case of a female with recurrent depressive disorder in whom episodic stress precipitated acute bleeding spells. An extensive hematopathological investigation revealed that she had von Willebrand factor deficiency. Our report adds to the literature that, apart from inducing procoagulant states, stress can precipitate bleeding episodes in patients with certain bleeding diatheses such as von Willebrand factor deficiency. The case also highlights that adequate pharmacotherapy and psychosocial interventions can yield adequate remission of both depression and bleeding spells.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):292-295
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_349_17
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Sandpaper-Gate: Psychology plays its innings

    • Authors: Sai Krishna Tikka, Shobit Garg
      Pages: 296 - 298
      Abstract: Sai Krishna Tikka, Shobit Garg
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):296-298

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):296-298
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_151_18
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • A comment on “add-on aripiprazole for atypical
           antipsychotic-induced, clinically significant hyperprolactinemia”

    • Authors: Ahmed Naguy
      Pages: 299 - 300
      Abstract: Ahmed Naguy
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):299-300

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2018 40(3):299-300
      PubDate: Wed,9 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_47_18
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.225.57.230
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-