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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine
  [SJR: 0.344]   [H-I: 9]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0253-7176
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Mood stabilisers, but for lithium, are not stabilizing moods! Bipolar
           disorders: Clinical conundrums 2

    • Authors: MS Reddy, Starlin Vijay Mythri, Swetha Reddy
      Pages: 553 - 557
      Abstract: MS Reddy, Starlin Vijay Mythri, Swetha Reddy
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):553-557

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):553-557
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_427_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Ethics in psychiatric research: Issues and recommendations

    • Authors: Shobhit Jain, Pooja Patnaik Kuppili, Raman Deep Pattanayak, Rajesh Sagar
      Pages: 558 - 565
      Abstract: Shobhit Jain, Pooja Patnaik Kuppili, Raman Deep Pattanayak, Rajesh Sagar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):558-565
      Psychiatric research has increased remarkably over recent decades to help in understanding the current trends and better therapeutic options for illness. On the other hand, there is also a trend toward higher rates of retraction of published papers in the recent years. Ethics is required to maintain and increase the overall quality and morality of research. Psychiatric research faces several unique ethical challenges. Ethical guidelines are very important tool of research which safeguards participants; however, there is a dearth of such guidelines in India. The present paper aims to review available ethical issues and guidelines pertaining to psychiatric research. A search was conducted on Pubmed using search terms (e.g., “ethics,” “psychiatry,” “research”). Relevant studies were selected for the review after manual screening of title/abstract. Additional sources were referred to using cross references and Google Scholar. Psychiatric research has several important ethical issues which are different from other medical disciplines. These issues are related to informed consent, confidentiality, conflict of interest, therapeutic misconception, placebo related, vulnerability, exploitation, operational challenges, among others. The current paper has made several recommendations to deal with ethical challenges commonly faced in psychiatric research. The ethical guidelines are utmost needed for Indian psychiatric research. Specific guidelines are lacking pertaining to psychiatric research. The issues and recommendations merit a further discussion and consideration.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):558-565
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_131_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • “Vaping:” Emergence of a new paraphernalia

    • Authors: Subrata Naskar, Praveen Kumar Jakati
      Pages: 566 - 572
      Abstract: Subrata Naskar, Praveen Kumar Jakati
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):566-572
      As research, has progressed through ages, we have been able to uncover the true nature of nicotine addiction. Humankind is now aware of the various ailments that it brings with it. As the slogan for a smokeless world for a better world has been raised, a new practice called “vaping” has come to the forefront. The use of electronic cigarettes (EC) has been on the rise recently. Claims have been made over its role for nicotine deaddiction as well as reducing harmful use for chronic nicotine abusers. In the current review, we searched the PubMed database for available literatures on this practice. We conclude that though EC has the potential to work wonders in smoking cessation, the unforeseen adverse effects needs to be evaluated first before its large-scale introduction in market through solid evidence-based research.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):566-572
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_142_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation in the treatment:
           Resistant patients who suffer from severe obsessive-compulsive disorder

    • Authors: Kiomars Najafi, Youssef Fakour, Homa Zarrabi, Abtin Heidarzadeh, Mohammadrasoul Khalkhali, Taiebeh Yeganeh, Hasan Farahi, Marziyeh Rostamkhani, Tahereh Najafi, Soheil Shabafroz, Mahdiyeh Pakdaman
      Pages: 573 - 578
      Abstract: Kiomars Najafi, Youssef Fakour, Homa Zarrabi, Abtin Heidarzadeh, Mohammadrasoul Khalkhali, Taiebeh Yeganeh, Hasan Farahi, Marziyeh Rostamkhani, Tahereh Najafi, Soheil Shabafroz, Mahdiyeh Pakdaman
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):573-578
      Background: During the past years, significant efforts have been made to explain the biological backgrounds of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Cortical-subcortical and neurotransmitter models are used for explaining the symptoms of OCD, so our hypothesis is that brain's transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) can regulate the brain activities of the OCD patients. Thus, based on the mentioned issues, this research seeks to investigate the efficacy of TDCS in treatment-resistant patients who suffer from severe OCD. Materials and Methods: The present study is a clinical trial research which was based on the available sampling method, 42 treatment-resistant patients who suffer from severe OCD were selected as research's samples (2015–2016). Medical intervention protocol in this study is TDCS cathode type that was done in 15 sessions for 3 consecutive weeks (each session was conducted for 30 min daily). Yale–Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale was used for evaluating the efficacy of TDCS method during the 1st, 5th, 10th, and 15th sessions and it was also used for checking the 1st and 3rd monthly follow-up phases. Results: Variance within-group analysis (repeated measure) showed that the mean differences in the different stages of evaluation are significant (seven stages of evaluation). Conclusion: TDCS can be introduced as an appropriate, strong tool for regulating the brain - behavioral systems and it can also be introduced as a suitable alternative treatment for treatment-resistant patients who suffer from severe OCD.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):573-578
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_388_16
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Self-inflicted cut injury as common method of deliberate self harm: A
           retrospective study from Nepal

    • Authors: Shakya Rabi, Joshi Sulochana, Sharma Pawan
      Pages: 579 - 583
      Abstract: Shakya Rabi, Joshi Sulochana, Sharma Pawan
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):579-583
      Context: Deliberate self-injury, a fairly common condition is present across all culture. It is defined as intentional, direct injuring of body tissue without suicidal intent. We continue to lack a sufficient understanding of this behavior in the context of South East Asian region. Aims: This study aims to explore the characteristics of self-cutting, and gender differences in homologous group of youth applying for foreign employment in Nepal. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional, single interview method in an out-patient setting. Subjects and Methods: The youths applying for foreign employment were screened for self-harm attempt using single question. Screen positive individuals were applied with inclusion and exclusion criteria. The data were collected in a single interview by consultant psychiatrist. Results: Males were more than females and the mean age (standard deviation) at the time of act and current presentation were 16.52 (3.13) and 24.70 (5.54) years, respectively. Various methods were used in self-inflicting cut, and certain amount of stress was present in the majority of the participants. There was no significant difference between male and female in all descriptive characteristics except for mean age at the time of presentation. Conclusions: The descriptive results from Nepal are keeping with most of the published literature. The study is the first one from Nepal, and we expect that this will help in laying a good foundation for further studies with stronger methodologies.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):579-583
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_438_16
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Sociodemographic and clinical predictors of response in manic episodes: A
           naturalistic, prospective, cohort study

    • Authors: Jasmin Garg, Ajeet Sidana, BS Chavan, Shikha Goel
      Pages: 584 - 589
      Abstract: Jasmin Garg, Ajeet Sidana, BS Chavan, Shikha Goel
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):584-589
      Background: Response to treatment of a manic episode is dependent on several sociodemographic and clinical factors as reported by researchers from other countries. The prescription of mood stabilizers and/or antipsychotics for manic episode depends on these factors. There is a lack of availability of data from India on this topic. Hence, this study was planned to identify the predictors of pharmacological response. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with a diagnosis of bipolar affective disorder current episode manic were enrolled and assessed for sociodemographic variables and clinical variables such as age of onset, family history, comorbidities, index episode, and number of past episodes. They were divided into four groups depending on the treatment they were receiving, namely, lithium with an antipsychotic (n = 25), lithium with divalproex and an antipsychotic (n = 8), divalproex with an antipsychotic (n = 5), and the miscellaneous group (n = 4). The primary outcome measure was improvement in the Young Mania Rating Scale score and secondary outcome measure was duration of ward stay. Results: There was a significant improvement in all the treatment modalities and it was comparable. There was no significant impact of any sociodemographic or clinical variable on treatment outcome except that females had significantly better response than males. There was nearly significant shorter duration of hospitalization in the lithium and antipsychotics groups compared to divalproex group. Conclusion: All treatment modalities are equally efficacious in the management of manic episode in short term. However, lithium and antipsychotics tend to produce early response than divalproex. Other sociodemographic and clinical predictors were not significantly associated with response.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):584-589
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_418_16
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Role overload, role self distance, role stagnation as determinants of job
           satisfaction and turnover intention in banking sector

    • Authors: Monica Kunte, Priya Gupta, Sonali Bhattacharya, Netra Neelam
      Pages: 590 - 599
      Abstract: Monica Kunte, Priya Gupta, Sonali Bhattacharya, Netra Neelam
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):590-599
      Purpose: This study examined the relationship of the organizational role stress: Role overload, role self-distance, and role stagnation with job satisfaction and turnover intention with a sample of banking employees in India. Methodology: In this research, we used the RODS scale developed by Prohit and Pareek (2010) for measuring occupational role scale. The reliability of the scale came out to be 0.71. Findings: The majority of employees of all ranks, in both private and public sector banks, suffer from high role stress of all types. It was found that role overload and role stagnation are inversely associated with banking employees' job satisfaction. Private sector bank employees have more role stress and more unsatisfied than employees of public sector banks. Employees Turnover intention was found to be positively impacted by job satisfaction, contrary to many other studies. Possible reasons have been suggested. Job satisfaction was found to play a partial mediating role in the relationship between role overload and turnover intention with 40% mediation. Further, employees with longer tenure (work experience) have less role stress and are more satisfied. Originality: This study is unique in the sense there is hardly any study linking role stress to job satisfaction and turnover intention, specially in Indian context.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):590-599
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.217022
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Erectile dysfunction: An underestimated presentation in patients with
           diabetes mellitus

    • Authors: Zeeshan Anwar, Vishal Sinha, Sayantanava Mitra, Ashwani Kumar Mishra, Mahboobul Hasan Ansari, Abhishek Bharti, Vipin Kumar, Ashwini Kumar Nigam
      Pages: 600 - 604
      Abstract: Zeeshan Anwar, Vishal Sinha, Sayantanava Mitra, Ashwani Kumar Mishra, Mahboobul Hasan Ansari, Abhishek Bharti, Vipin Kumar, Ashwini Kumar Nigam
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):600-604
      Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus. ED, like other sexual disorders, is often under-reported and under-diagnosed, as talking about sex is considered a taboo in our society. Methodology: All the male patients with diabetes mellitus (with or without active complaints of ED) attending Medicine or Psychiatry OPD of the institute during the study period were enrolled in the study. They were investigated for their body-mass index (BMI), blood sugar and lipid profile; and were assessed on HAM-D, General Health Questionnaire-30, IIEF, sex myth checklist and QOL Instrument for Indian Diabetes Patients (QOLID). Result and Discussion: In the present study, a total of 138 diabetic patients were assessed, and those with severe ED were found to have poor glycemic control, worse lipid profile, higher body mass index, later age of onset, and longer duration of untreated diabetes as compared to non-ED patients. ED patients also scored higher on depression rating scale, had poorer general health and quality of life (QOL). Early attention to ED in diabetic patients can improve general health and QOL of the sufferers. Conclusion: DM patients with poor glycemic control and advanced age have a higher propensity of developing severe ED, which further deteriorates the already compromised health & QOL.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):600-604
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.217015
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Reactions to psychiatry referral in patients presenting with physical
           complaints to medical and surgical outpatient services

    • Authors: Shubh Mohan Singh, BN Subodh, Aseem Mehra, Abbas Mehdi
      Pages: 605 - 610
      Abstract: Shubh Mohan Singh, BN Subodh, Aseem Mehra, Abbas Mehdi
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):605-610
      Background: While it is well known that patients with psychiatric illness feel stigmatized, little is known about the reactions to a psychiatric referral among those who visit general hospital medical and surgical services for their complaints. Materials and Methods: This study assessed the sociodemographic details, psychiatric diagnosis, somatic symptom severity, and interview-based reactions to referral among patients referred to psychiatry services from other departments in a general tertiary hospital in North India. Fifty-nine males and 101 females were assessed over 6 months for this purpose. Results: A majority of patients were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder and had significant somatic symptom severity. The themes explored were the decision to accept the referral, possibility of the presence of mental illness as signified by a psychiatric diagnosis and factors that enabled or impeded psychiatric treatment seeking. Conclusions: Results indicate that patients did not empower in decision-making, a reluctance to accept the possibility of a psychiatric diagnosis and accept medication and had poor knowledge about psychiatry. Referring clinicians and psychiatrists should be sensitive to patient perceptions so that better care is possible.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):605-610
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_402_16
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Stressful and traumatic experiences among women with alcohol use disorders
           in India

    • Authors: Kanika Malik, Prabhat Kumar Chand, P Marimuthu, LN Suman
      Pages: 611 - 618
      Abstract: Kanika Malik, Prabhat Kumar Chand, P Marimuthu, LN Suman
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):611-618
      Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine lifetime stressful and traumatic experiences among women with alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Methods: The sample comprised of two groups: a clinical group of 35 women with a diagnosis of AUD and a comparison group of 60 women drawn from the community. After screening out, the participants were administered Life Stressor Checklist-Revised. Results: On an average, clinical group was exposed to 7.57 (standard deviation [SD] = 4.14) stressful events and comparison group was exposed to 4.03 (SD = 2.80) stressful events across the lifespan (t = 4.976; P < 0.001). Clinical group reported a high number of childhood abuse and interpersonal traumas across lifespan than comparison group. The relationship between adverse life experiences and alcohol abuse among women was bidirectional. Conclusion: Understanding the nature and experiences of trauma in this group has implications for planning gender-sensitive treatment programs for women seeking help for AUDs in India
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):611-618
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_411_16
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Development and preliminary testing of the biopsychosocial prognosis scale
           for coronary artery bypass grafting

    • Authors: Meena Hariharan, Marlyn Thomas, Suvashisa Rana
      Pages: 619 - 626
      Abstract: Meena Hariharan, Marlyn Thomas, Suvashisa Rana
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):619-626
      Background: The present study attempted to develop a self-report scale called Biopsychosocial Prognosis Scale for Coronary Artery Bypass grafting (BIPROSCAB) that measured patients' prognosis in an integrated manner, a month after they had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Method: The development and preliminary testing of the psychometric properties of BIPROSCAB followed five phases involving 450 patients in total. Results: Findings gave rise to a 25-item scale which was subjected to an exploratory factor analysis using principal component analysis with varimax rotation. A 9-factor structure emerged, and the factors were named post-CABG affect state, post-CABG anxiety, post-CABG physical pain, discomfort in surgical sites, worry about return to normalcy, discomfort in the leg, CABG bio-social by-products, constraints in socializing, and infection and interference to routine life. The reliability, validity, and usability of BIPROSCAB were also analyzed. Conclusion: BIPROSCAB is a reliable, valid, and useful multidimensional self-report scale for measuring and evaluating the impact of medical treatment and psychosocial intervention in patients after CABG.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):619-626
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_124_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • A comparative study of factors associated with relapse in alcohol
           dependence and opioid dependence

    • Authors: Maithili Kadam, Ankita Sinha, Swateja Nimkar, Yusuf Matcheswalla, Avinash De Sousa
      Pages: 627 - 633
      Abstract: Maithili Kadam, Ankita Sinha, Swateja Nimkar, Yusuf Matcheswalla, Avinash De Sousa
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):627-633
      Background: Alcohol and opiates are among the most addictive substances posing significant public health problems due to the biopsychosocial impact that they have on individuals. Research shows that majority of abstinent alcohol and/or opioid dependence subjects relapse within 1 year. It has also been estimated that 26–36 million people worldwide abuse opiates, with exceptionally high-relapse rates. The purpose of this study was to compare the sociodemographic factors and correlates relapse in alcohol dependence and opioid dependence. Methodology: This research uses a cross-sectional comparative study design with a sample size of 60 drawn from a population of clinically diagnosed patients of alcohol dependence (n = 30) or opioid dependence (n = 30) and seeking treatment for relapse. In addition to collecting sociodemographic data, other factors such as craving, affect, self-efficacy, and expressed emotions were measured using standardized instruments including brief substance craving scale, Bradburn affect balance scale, drug avoidance and self-efficacy scale and family emotional involvement, and conflict scale. The data were statistically analyzed. Results: Disparity in sociodemographic factors was seen in both the groups with opioid group being more likely to be single, unemployed, belonging to lower socioeconomic status, and having a criminal record (P = 0.025). Among factors associated with relapse, the opioid group scored significantly higher on craving, perceived criticism (P = 0.0001), and lower on self-efficacy (P = 0.016). Most common reason cited for relapse in both the groups was desire for positive mood. Conclusion: This study highlights the role of social determinants in drug dependence and relapse. Relapse was found to be a complex multifactorial phenomenon. Despite differences in presentation, somewhat similar relapse mechanisms were seen in both groups.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):627-633
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_356_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • A cross-sectional study to estimate cardiovascular risk factors in
           patients with bipolar disorder

    • Authors: Swetha Reddy Damegunta, Prasad Rao Gundugurti
      Pages: 634 - 640
      Abstract: Swetha Reddy Damegunta, Prasad Rao Gundugurti
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):634-640
      Background: There is increasing recognition of cardiovascular mortality and comorbidity in bipolar disorder (BD) in the recent times. Framingham 10 years risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been a widely accepted as a reliable estimate of cardiovascular risk in the general population. A few studies have estimated the relative risk of developing CHD in BDs, in India. We attempt to present a cross-sectional data from a prospective study to estimate the 10 years cardiovascular risk in BD population. Subjects and Methods: A total of 50 patients with BD aged between 20 and 60 years fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled into this study. Demographic variables and clinical evaluations including smoking history, medical and pharmacologic treatment history, physical examination, anthropometric measurements, and clinical laboratories for metabolic profiles were assessed. Using the Framingham 10-year risk questionnaire, the risk for each patient was calculated and compared with that of normal healthy control group. Results: The risk of developing a future cardiovascular event was 3.26% in BD and 2.02% in controls. We identified that a higher age at onset of illness, waist-hip ratio, total cholesterol, and unemployment showed a strong positive correlation with future CHD risk whereas administration of valproate, lithium for management of BD, higher socioeconomic status and educational status, and nonsmokers was associated negatively with the future CHD risk. Conclusions: It appears that there is a significant association between BD and metabolic factors, CHD, sociodemographic variables, and underscores the predictive ability of Framingham risk score in detecting cardiovascular diseases.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):634-640
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_369_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Efficacy of adjunctive single session counseling for medically unexplained
           symptoms: A randomized controlled trial

    • Authors: Vikas Menon, Balasubramanian Shanmuganathan, Jaiganesh Selvapandian Thamizh, Anand Babu Arun, Siddharth Sarkar
      Pages: 641 - 647
      Abstract: Vikas Menon, Balasubramanian Shanmuganathan, Jaiganesh Selvapandian Thamizh, Anand Babu Arun, Siddharth Sarkar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):641-647
      Context: Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are often poorly responsive to standard treatments. Aim: The aim of the study is to assess short-term efficacy of adjunctive single session cognitive behavior therapy (CBT)-based counseling for patients with MUS. Setting and Design: Randomized controlled trial at a psychosomatic clinic of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients with MUS were randomized to receive either the single session counseling (intervention group) (n = 41) or control group which received treatment as usual (n = 35). The counseling intervention focused on three areas – cognitive reattribution, shifting focus, and guided muscular relaxation and lasted around 30 min. The two groups were assessed at baseline and after 1 month for change in outcome measures. Statistical Analysis Used: Repeated measures analysis of variance. P value was adjusted for multiple comparisons using Bonferroni correction and set at <0.01 for significance. Results: Both groups did not differ on change in the primary outcome measure: Patient Health Questionnaire – 15 scores (P = 0.055). However, at follow-up, the intervention group showed statistically greater reduction in the number of workdays lost (P = 0.005). Trend level changes were noted for depressive symptom reduction only in the intervention group (P = 0.022). Conclusions: One session CBT-based therapy demonstrates potentially important benefits over standard care among Indian patients with MUS. Further testing in larger samples with longer follow-up periods is therefore recommended.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):641-647
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_73_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Prevalence and sociodemographic profile of lithium-induced cutaneous side
           effects in bipolar affective disorder patients: A 1-year prospective
           observational study in South India

    • Authors: BS Suganya Priyadharshini, I Syed Ummar
      Pages: 648 - 652
      Abstract: BS Suganya Priyadharshini, I Syed Ummar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):648-652
      Objectives: Objective in our study is i) To assess the prevalence and sociodemographic profile of cutaneous side effects in bipolar affective disorder patients (BPAD) on lithium. ii) To assess the course of pre-existing skin reactions, when patient is initiated on lithium therapy. Methods: Lithium induced cutaneous side effects were assessed at baseline and monthly for 6 months followed by every 2 months over a year. Dermatologist opinion obtained to diagnose and treat for each patient who developed cutaneous side effects. Data were analyzed in percentage. Results: The prevalence of lithium induced cutaneous side effects in our study is 38.46%. On analyzing the individual subtype of cutaneous lesions, acneiform eruption and hairfall were most common. The cutaneous adverse reactions on lithium are more common in early adulthood than in the late adulthood and geriatric age group and among the subtypes of skin lesion acneiform eruptions are more common among males than in females. On analyzing the course of pre-existing lesions, severe alopecia developed with pre-existing systemic lupus erythematosis. Conclusion: These novel finding indicate that prevalence of lithium induced cutaneous side effects continues to be high. Hence, clinician should educate the patients before initiating lithium to improve attrition rate.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):648-652
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_87_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Problems of face recognition in patients with behavioral variant
           frontotemporal dementia

    • Authors: Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra, Ketaki Patwardhan, Anupama Ramakanth Pai
      Pages: 653 - 658
      Abstract: Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra, Ketaki Patwardhan, Anupama Ramakanth Pai
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):653-658
      Introduction: Faces are very special as they are most essential for social cognition in humans. It is partly understood that face processing in its abstractness involves several extra striate areas. One of the most important causes for caregiver suffering in patients with anterior dementia is lack of empathy. This apart from being a behavioral disorder could be also due to failure to categorize the emotions of the people around them. Patients and Methods: Inlusion criteria: DSM IV for Bv FTD Tested for prosopagnosia - familiar faces, famous face, smiling face, crying face and reflected face using a simple picture card (figure 1). Exclusion Criteria: Advanced illness and mixed causes. Observations: 46 patients (15 females, 31 males) 24 had defective face recognition. (mean age 51.5),10/15 females (70%) and 14/31males(47. Familiar face recognition defect was found in 6/10 females and 6/14 males. Total- 40%(6/15) females and 19.35%(6/31)males with FTD had familiar face recognition. Famous Face: 9/10 females and 7/14 males. Total- 60% (9/15) females with FTD had famous face recognition defect as against 22.6%(7/31) males with FTD Smiling face defects in 8/10 female and no males. Total- 53.33% (8/15) females. Crying face recognition defect in 3/10 female and 2 /14 males. Total- 20%(3/15) females and 6.5%(2/31) males. Reflected face recognition defect in 4 females. Results: Famous face recognition and positive emotion recognition defect in 80%, only 20% comprehend positive emotions, Face recognition defects are found in only 45% of males and more common in females. Conclusion: Face recognition is more affected in females with FTD There is differential involvement of different aspects of the face recognition could be one of the important factor underlying decline in the emotional and social behavior of these patients. Understanding these pathological processes will give more insight regarding patient behavior.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):653-658
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_90_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Family loading and morbidity risk of attention-deficit hyperactivity
           disorder in patients with alcohol-dependence syndrome

    • Authors: Mahesh Desai, Mrunal Bandawar, Arun Kandasamy, Vivek Benegal
      Pages: 659 - 662
      Abstract: Mahesh Desai, Mrunal Bandawar, Arun Kandasamy, Vivek Benegal
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):659-662
      Background: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and substance-use disorders often co-occur. Aim: Aim of this study was to look at the family loading of ADHD (in adults and children) in patients with alcohol-dependence syndrome (ADS) along with the estimation of morbidity risk (MR) for developing ADHD. Methods: Thirty-five male patients with ADS along with their 369 first-degree relatives (FDRs) – both children and adults – were recruited. Results: ADHD and residual ADD (ADDRT) were significantly more common in the early-onset (EO) ADS group and their FDR. In ADHD children, high MR (27.27%) for developing EO of ADS was noted. Discussion: Findings from this study raise an avenue for research in the Indian population about the shared risk between ADS and ADHD.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):659-662
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_263_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Can we call it &#8220;Stinky-finger syndrome?&#8221;

    • Authors: Masood Maqbool, Firdous Ahmed War, Mohit Kumar
      Pages: 663 - 664
      Abstract: Masood Maqbool, Firdous Ahmed War, Mohit Kumar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):663-664
      Many accounts refer to insertion of finger into anus mostly for gratification from stimulation of prostate gland, but index case Mr. M. continued doing this to get rid of constipation that eventually led to feelings of guilt, stinky fingers, not able to defecate normally, and dysphoric emotions. Further research is needed to find out the phenomenology of this condition.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):663-664
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.217025
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Opioid withdrawal presenting as delirium and role of buprenorphine: A case
           series

    • Authors: Sourav Das, Divyashree Sah, Shiladitya Nandi, Payel Das
      Pages: 665 - 667
      Abstract: Sourav Das, Divyashree Sah, Shiladitya Nandi, Payel Das
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):665-667
      Opioid withdrawal is very rarely characterized by delirium unlike alcohol or benzodiazepine withdrawal. PubMed search through October 2016 reveals only two case series on delirium as feature of withdrawal in opioid dependence syndrome. We report two cases of opioid withdrawal (heroin) presenting with delirium when low-dose buprenorphine (2 mg/day) was added. Both the cases had no other substance abuse history and nil contributory past and family history. Both of them were improved after increasing the buprenorphine dosage to 6–8 mg/day. The possibility of delirium as a part of withdrawal symptom or as a phenomenon induced by buprenorphine or due to impurities in the heroin used is discussed.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):665-667
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.217027
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • The menacing side of valproate: A case series of valproate-induced
           hyperammonemia

    • Authors: Deeksha Elwadhi, Rashmi Prakash, Manushree Gupta
      Pages: 668 - 670
      Abstract: Deeksha Elwadhi, Rashmi Prakash, Manushree Gupta
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):668-670
      Valproate (VPA) is a well-tolerated and commonly used drug to treat variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. VPA-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare adverse effect which can commonly occur in the background of normal liver function and therapeutic serum levels. Any delay in treatment of VPA-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy can lead to life-threatening coma thus a strong clinical suspicion, fair understanding of the pathophysiology, and management of this drug-related complication can prevent fatal outcome. We hereby report a series of cases admitted to a tertiary care center that developed hyperammonemia and all patients recovered on stopping VPA. This case series cautions the clinicians about hyperammonemia as an uncommon but highly plausible life-threatening side effect, emphasizing astute observation, and high degree of clinical suspicion to prevent mortality and limit morbidity. Early recognition of subtle gastrointestinal, cognitive, and behavioral signs can lead to immediate intervention with satisfying results.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):668-670
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.217033
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • A serial Munchausen syndrome by proxy

    • Authors: Esra Ozgun Unal, Volkan Unal, Ali Gul, Mustafa Celtek, Behzat D&#305;ken, &#304;brahim Balc&#305;oglu
      Pages: 671 - 674
      Abstract: Esra Ozgun Unal, Volkan Unal, Ali Gul, Mustafa Celtek, Behzat Dıken, İbrahim Balcıoglu
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):671-674
      Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP) is a form of child abuse that describes children whose parents or caregivers invent illness stories and substantiate the stories by fabricating false physical signs. Through this case report, a serial MSBP case is presented along with psychiatric evaluation of the perpetrator mother who was sent to the Forensic Psychiatric Observation Department of the Council of Forensic Medicine to assess whether she has any mental disorder. Although there are several studies on MSBP, we present this case because the perpetrator mother was caught on the camera surveillance system of the hospital while closing the nose and mouth of the victim for fabricating the illness, and she also said that she had done the same thing to her two elder children to exclude their illnesses. Her two children had died and could not be diagnosed. Moreover, we discuss the psychopathology of the perpetrators, which is a less known area of MSBP. This is a very serious form of child abuse, with a high risk of repetition, and failure to diagnose might result in the death of the child.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):671-674
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.217017
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Misidentification of Wilson disease as Schizophrenia (1998–2013):
           Case report and review

    • Authors: Forouzan Elyasi
      Pages: 675 - 681
      Abstract: Forouzan Elyasi
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):675-681
      Wilson's disease (WD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to copper metabolism. Schizophrenia-like psychosis and delusional disorder are rare forms of psychiatric manifestations of WD. The lack of recognition of these signs and symptoms as being attributable to WD often leads to delays in diagnosis and management. Knowledge about relationship of the psychiatric manifestations to WD can help with the administration of adequate management aimed at both the psychiatric issues and underlying WD. The objectives of this article are to review case reports whose subject is the incorrect diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like syndrome in patients with WD and to detail one case of this mismanagement of the disease. A 35-year-old unmarried Iranian woman presented to the consulting psychiatrist in the emergency room after a suicide attempt due to commanding auditory hallucination. She had previous eleven admissions in psychiatric hospital with major depressive episode with psychotic features, schizoaffective disorders, and then schizophrenia diagnosis. Nineteen years after her first symptoms, it was discovered that the patient was suffering from WD. We searched Google Scholar, Ovid, PsycINFO, CINHAL, and PubMed databases from 1985 to 2015. Finally, 14 researches were entered into the study. Psychiatric manifestations may precede the diagnosis of WD and other symptoms related to neurological or hepatic impairment. Early detection of WD is important to prevent catastrophic outcome. Young patients presenting with psychiatric presentations along with abnormal movement disorder, seizure, or conversion-like symptoms should be evaluate for WD even if signs and symptoms are typically suggestive of schizophrenia or manic episode. An interdisciplinary approach with good collaboration of psychiatrists and neurologists is crucial for WD because early diagnosis and management without delay is an important for good prognosis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):675-681
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_339_16
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Clozapine-induced acute hypertriglyceridemia

    • Authors: Mitesh Kumar, Ajeet Sidana
      Pages: 682 - 684
      Abstract: Mitesh Kumar, Ajeet Sidana
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):682-684
      The aim of this study is to highlight the association between the use of clozapine and the early development of hypertriglyceridemia, a condition that substantially increases the risk of cardiovascular events and other medical complications. A 34-year-old female with a background history of schizophrenia presented with acute elevation of serum triglycerides and cholesterol within 2 weeks of starting clozapine. Her metabolic parameters normalized following discontinuation of clozapine. Possible hypotheses for lipid dysregulation with atypical antipsychotics include weight gain, dietary changes, and development of glucose intolerance; however, some other factors may be responsible for this rapid escalation of lipid levels. Lipid and metabolic profiles should be closely monitored in patients receiving clozapine to facilitate early detection and intervention to prevent further health complications.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):682-684
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.217031
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Adolescent-onset X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as
           treatment-resistant bipolar disorder

    • Authors: Anirban Ray, Satish Chandra Girimaji, Rose Dawn Bharath
      Pages: 685 - 687
      Abstract: Anirban Ray, Satish Chandra Girimaji, Rose Dawn Bharath
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):685-687
      A small proportion of bipolar disorder of adolescent onset can be secondary to underlying neurological disorder (secondary mania). We report a case of treatment-resistant mania secondary to cerebral form of adrenoleukodystrophy of adolescent onset. This case demonstrates the need for clinicians to be alert to the possibility of rare neurological diseases that can present with psychiatric manifestations.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):685-687
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_36_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • A case of carbamazepine-induced severe cholestatic hepatitis: Case report
           and review of literature

    • Authors: Suhas Ganesh, Lekhansh Shukla, Arun Kandasamy, Vivek Benegal
      Pages: 688 - 690
      Abstract: Suhas Ganesh, Lekhansh Shukla, Arun Kandasamy, Vivek Benegal
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):688-690
      Carbamazepine (CBZ) is one of the widely prescribed drugs in the field of neuropsychiatry. We report a case of a 27-year-old female patient presenting with severe cholestatic hepatitis presenting after the initiation of CBZ. We establish the probability of drug-induced liver injury using Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences/Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method causality assessment scale, and the patient had high probability with a score of 9. We briefly review the literature in this field discussing the scope of the problem, etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestation, course, and management.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):688-690
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_19_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Neural effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in
           schizophrenia: A case study using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    • Authors: S Trevor Taylor, Harleen Chhabra, Vanteemar S Sreeraj, Venkataram Shivakumar, Sunil V Kalmady, Ganesan Venkatasubramanian
      Pages: 691 - 694
      Abstract: S Trevor Taylor, Harleen Chhabra, Vanteemar S Sreeraj, Venkataram Shivakumar, Sunil V Kalmady, Ganesan Venkatasubramanian
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):691-694
      Schizophrenia is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by delusions, hallucinations, behavioral symptoms, and cognitive deficits. Roughly, 70%–80% of schizophrenia patients experience auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), with 25%–30% demonstrating resistance to conventional antipsychotic medications. Studies suggest a promising role for add-on transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in the treatment of medication-refractory AVHs. The mechanisms through which tDCS could be therapeutic in such cases are unclear, but possibly involve neuroplastic effects. In recent years, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) has been used successfully to study tDCS-induced neuroplastic changes. In a double-blind, sham-controlled design, we applied fNIRS to measure task-dependent cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes as a surrogate outcome of single session tDCS-induced effects on neuroplasticity in a schizophrenia patient with persistent auditory hallucinations. The observations are discussed in this case report.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):691-694
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_238_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Baclofen overdose presenting as psychosis with catatonia

    • Authors: Abhinav Nahar, Mukku Shiva Shanker Reddy, Bhaskaran Andi Subramaniyam, Harish Thippeswamy, Prabha S Chandra, Santosh Kumar Chaturvedi
      Pages: 695 - 697
      Abstract: Abhinav Nahar, Mukku Shiva Shanker Reddy, Bhaskaran Andi Subramaniyam, Harish Thippeswamy, Prabha S Chandra, Santosh Kumar Chaturvedi
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):695-697
      Baclofen is a centrally acting gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor agonist with many therapeutic uses in neurology and psychiatry. An overdose of baclofen is known to cause serious side effects such as encephalopathy, seizures, respiratory depression, and delirium. Association of baclofen with psychosis has also been reported. In this case report, we are highlighting the manifestation of catatonic features in addition to psychosis following baclofen overdose.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):695-697
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_291_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Are we overdiagnosing bipolar disorder?

    • Authors: MS Reddy, Starlin M Vijay, Swetha Reddy
      Pages: 698 - 702
      Abstract: MS Reddy, Starlin M Vijay, Swetha Reddy
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):698-702
      Bipolar disorder (BD) is an established diagnostic entity used by clinicians for over a century. It is distinguished by the distinct manic and depressive episodes with interepisode euthymia. It has an illness course where both recovery and recurrences are a rule and has a good long-term prognosis, as reported earlier by Emil Kraeplin. There is an opinion in the current literature that BD is often underdiagnosed as unipolar depression, and based on that opinion, spectrum concept was introduced. Here, we present 5 cases to highlight that overdiagnosis of BD is also not infrequent and we discuss its reasons and therapeutic implications.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):698-702
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_419_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Digital platforms for mental health-care delivery

    • Authors: Chethan Basavarajappa, Prabhat Kumar Chand
      Pages: 703 - 706
      Abstract: Chethan Basavarajappa, Prabhat Kumar Chand
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):703-706
      Mental, neurological, and substance abuse disorders cause huge burden. The available resources to tackle the huge burden are insufficient, inequitably distributed, and inefficiently used, which results in a large majority of people with these disorders receiving no care at all. Advances in technology can be used to address the concerns. At present, technology is utilized in online psychological interventions and mobile apps in the United States of America and United Kingdom. In India, technological advances are utilized in telemental health, mobile apps, software aiding psychological assessment and retraining, training for mental health professionals, and information delivery to general public. Although this would be cost effective, digital divide, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed for better penetration of the health technologies to the persons in need.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):703-706
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_209_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Unguided mental health self-help apps: Reflections on challenges through a
           clinician's lens

    • Authors: Seema Mehrotra, Satish Kumar, Paulomi Sudhir, Girish N Rao, Jagadisha Thirthalli, Aditi Gandotra
      Pages: 707 - 711
      Abstract: Seema Mehrotra, Satish Kumar, Paulomi Sudhir, Girish N Rao, Jagadisha Thirthalli, Aditi Gandotra
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):707-711
      The past one decade has witnessed a boom in the availability of Internet-based self-help apps in the field of mental health. Several apps have emerged that aim to provide information and strategies to empower individuals with self-help approaches to deal with issues and concerns related to mental health. A large number of these apps in developing countries are likely to be those which depend entirely on the users to go over the self-help program on their own (unguided internet-based self-help). Only a few apps add a component of periodic professional contact/technical support through phone/email or other means to supplement the self-help strategies suggested in the app that the user is expected to utilize. This scenario poses several challenges in use of unguided self-help apps for mental health. This paper enumerates some of these challenges for potential users of the apps from the perspective of clinicians. These range from difficulties in choosing the right app, limited scope for contextualization, and motivation management to awareness about when to step up to a higher intensity intervention. Despite these challenges, unguided self-help apps can serve important purposes, and hence we propose a few recommendations to address such challenges.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):707-711
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_151_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Gender differences in the 5 years course of bipolar disorder after a first
           manic episode: A retrospective review

    • Authors: Divyasree Sreedhar, Karishma Rajendra Kulkarni, Abhishek Purty, Kesavan Muralidharan, YC Janardhan Reddy, Sanjeev Jain
      Pages: 712 - 713
      Abstract: Divyasree Sreedhar, Karishma Rajendra Kulkarni, Abhishek Purty, Kesavan Muralidharan, YC Janardhan Reddy, Sanjeev Jain
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):712-713

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):712-713
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.217020
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Biomarkers in autism spectrum disorders: An illusion or promising
           reality?

    • Authors: Sundar Gnanavel
      Pages: 714 - 715
      Abstract: Sundar Gnanavel
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):714-715

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):714-715
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_122_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Disability certification in India: Indian Disability Evaluation and
           Assessment Scale versus World Health Organization Disability Assessment
           Schedule

    • Authors: Chethan Basavarajappa, Urvakhsh M Mehta, Thanapal Sivakumar, Naveen Channaveerachari Kumar, Jagadisha Thirthalli
      Pages: 715 - 716
      Abstract: Chethan Basavarajappa, Urvakhsh M Mehta, Thanapal Sivakumar, Naveen Channaveerachari Kumar, Jagadisha Thirthalli
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):715-716

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):715-716
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_166_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Cholesterol and mental health: A balanced perspective

    • Authors: Vikas Menon, Abhishek Ghosh, Chittaranjan Andrade
      Pages: 717 - 718
      Abstract: Vikas Menon, Abhishek Ghosh, Chittaranjan Andrade
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):717-718

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):717-718
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_189_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • The “EMIC” and “ETIC” Models: Two equally
           important insight assessments in psychosis

    • Authors: Boban Joseph, TP Swathi
      Pages: 718 - 719
      Abstract: Boban Joseph, TP Swathi
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):718-719

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):718-719
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_145_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
  • Lurasidone-induced oculogyric crisis

    • Authors: Soumitra Das, Adesh Agrawal
      Pages: 719 - 720
      Abstract: Soumitra Das, Adesh Agrawal
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):719-720

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(5):719-720
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_266_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 5 (2017)
       
 
 
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