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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology
  [SJR: 0.285]   [H-I: 22]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0377-4929 - ISSN (Online) 0974-5130
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • From Editor's desk

    • Authors: Ranjan Agrawal
      Pages: 1 - 1
      Abstract: Ranjan Agrawal
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):1-1

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):1-1
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/0377-4929.228204
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A practical diagnostic approach to hepatic masses

    • Authors: Monika Vyas, Dhanpat Jain
      Pages: 2 - 17
      Abstract: Monika Vyas, Dhanpat Jain
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):2-17
      The differential diagnosis of hepatic mass lesions is broad and arriving at the right diagnosis can be challenging, especially on needle biopsies. The differential diagnosis of liver tumors in children is different from adults and is beyond the scope of this review. In adults, the approach varies depending on the age, gender, and presence of background liver disease. The lesions can be divided broadly into primary and metastatic (secondary), and the primary lesions can be further divided into those of hepatocellular origin and nonhepatocellular origin. The first category consists of benign and malignant lesions arising from hepatocytes, while the second category includes biliary, mesenchymal, hematopoietic, and vascular tumors. Discussion of nonepithelial neoplasms is beyond the scope of this review. The hepatocytic lesions comprise dysplastic nodules, focal nodular hyperplasia, hepatic adenoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma, and the differential diagnosis can be challenging requiring clinicopathological correlation and application of immunohistochemical (IHC) markers. Liver is a common site for metastasis, sometimes presenting with an unknown primary site, and proper workup is the key to arriving at the correct diagnosis. The correct diagnosis in this setting requires a systematic approach with attention to histologic features, imaging findings, clinical presentation, and judicious use of IHC markers. The list of antibodies that can be used for this purpose keeps on growing continually. It is important for pathologists to be up to date with the sensitivity and specificity of these markers and their diagnostic role and clinical implications. The purpose of this review is to outline the differential diagnosis of hepatic masses in adults and discuss an algorithmic approach to make a right diagnosis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):2-17
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_578_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of the osteopontin in oral peripheral and central giant cell
           granuloma

    • Authors: Nihan Aksakalli
      Pages: 18 - 21
      Abstract: Nihan Aksakalli
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):18-21
      Aim: Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) and central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) of the jaws are benign proliferations of spindle-shaped mesenchymal cells and multinucleated giant cells. Despite the histopathologic similarities, they have markedly different clinical behavior. PGCG shows low recurrence rate whereas CGCG shows a variable clinical behavior ranging from nonaggressive lesions to aggressive lesions characterizing by pain, rapid growth, and high recurrence rate. Therefore, the aim of the study was to compare CGCG with PGCG by immunohistochemistry using Ki-67, osteopontin (OPN), and integrin αvantibodies. Subjects and Methods: Twenty PGCG and 20 CGCG were selected for immunohistochemical evaluation of OPN, integrin αv, and Ki-67 in multinucleated giant cells and mononucleated cells of PGCG and CGCG. Results: PGCG showed higher Ki-67 immunoreactivity in mononucleated cells compared to CGCG (P < 0.05). There was no reactivity with Ki-67 in multinucleated giant cells of both groups. Mononucleated cells in CGCGs demonstrated increased OPN and integrin αvexpressions in comparison with PGCGs (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The clinic behavior of CGCG being more aggressive than PGCG might be explained by the high expression of OPN and integrin αv. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the other OPN receptors and their role on the biologic behavior of these lesions.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):18-21
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_214_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Role of calcium-sensing receptor, Galectin-3, Cyclin D1, and Ki-67
           immunohistochemistry to favor in the diagnosis of parathyroid carcinoma

    • Authors: Nuran Sungu, Hayriye Tatli Dogan, Aydan Kili&#231;arslan, Mehmet Kili&#231;, Sefika Polat, Mehmet Toka&#231;, Soner Akbaba, &#214;mer Parlak, Serdar Balci, Bet&#252;l &#214;g&#252;t, Bekir &#199;akir
      Pages: 22 - 26
      Abstract: Nuran Sungu, Hayriye Tatli Dogan, Aydan Kiliçarslan, Mehmet Kiliç, Sefika Polat, Mehmet Tokaç, Soner Akbaba, Ömer Parlak, Serdar Balci, Betül Ögüt, Bekir Çakir
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):22-26
      Background: As histopathological findings of parathyroid carcinoma are not certain, the diagnosis of tumors with degenerative changes may be difficult. In these cases, immunohistochemical markers are beneficial. We aimed to research the acceptability of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), Galactin-3, Cyclin D1, and Ki-67 as helpful markers in parathyroid tumors in cases which are difficult to diagnose. Materials and Methods: Those cases who had been diagnosed with atypical parathyroid adenoma and parathyroid carcinoma between 2010 and 2015 were reevaluated. İmmunohistochemical markers were applied to this cases. Results: About 21 cases were parathyroid adenoma, 14 were atypical adenoma, and 10 cases were parathyroid carcinoma. According to the immunohistochemical results, global loss of CaSR staining was seen in 50% (5/10) of the patients with carcinoma while there was no loss of staining in those with parathyroid adenoma (P = 0,001). Global loss of CaSR staining was found in only one out of 14 cases with atypical adenoma. The expression of Galactin-3 was found to be positive in 40% (4/10) of carcinoma cases, 71.4% (10/14) of those with atypical adenoma, and 14.3% (3/21) of those with adenoma (P = 0,002). Cyclin D1 expression was determined to be positive in 70% (7/10) of patients with carcinoma, 71.4% (10/14) of atypical adenoma cases, and 23.8% (5/21) of those with adenoma. The Ki-67 proliferation index was seen to be above 5% in 50% (5/10) of carcinoma cases and 35,7% (5/14) of those with atypical adenoma. Conclusion: In these studies, it has been emphasized that the global loss of CaSR staining was used as a negative marker in the diagnosis of carcinoma. In this study, we have also confirmed that the global loss of CaSR staining is a useful marker to determine potential increased malignancy.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):22-26
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_85_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Myeloid cell leukemia-1 protein expression and myeloid cell leukemia-1
           gene amplification in non small cell lung cancer

    • Authors: Tony El Jabbour, Siddhartha Dilip Dalvi, Sungeun Kim, Christine Sheehan, Jeffrey S Ross
      Pages: 27 - 30
      Abstract: Tony El Jabbour, Siddhartha Dilip Dalvi, Sungeun Kim, Christine Sheehan, Jeffrey S Ross
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):27-30
      Background: Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) is a member of the B-cell lymphoma 2 family known to play a significant role in the regulation of apoptosis. Mcl-1 expression has been studied in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines but has not been previously evaluated as a prognostic factor in clinical samples. Materials and Methods: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 119 NSCLC, including 33 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 55 adenocarcinomas (AC), and 31 either pure adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) or AC with lepidic features were immunostained by an automated method with rabbit polyclonal Mcl-1. Cytoplasmic Mcl-1 (cMcl-1) immunoreactivity was scored based on intensity and percentage of positive tumor cells in both tumor and adjacent benign epithelium in each case. MCL1 amplification was determined by hybrid capture-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) on a separate cohort of 9393 NSCLC samples. Results: Intense diffuse cMcl-1 overexpression was noted in 35/119 (29%) tumors overall and correlated with tumor type (52% AIS vs. 31% AC vs. 6% SCC, P < 0.0001), tumor grade (48% grade 1 vs. 14% grade 2 vs. 31% grade 3, P = 0.007), small tumor size (36% ≤3.0 cm vs. 16% >3.0 cm, P = 0.016), and lengthened survival within the AIS subgroup (100% alive vs. 42% expired, P = 0.018) while showing a trend toward correlation with nonrecurrent disease overall (32% nonrecurrent vs. 11% recurrent, P = 0.072) and within the AC subgroup (33% nonrecurrent vs. 0% recurrent, P = 0.092). MCL1 amplification was identified in 569 (6%) of 9393 NSCLC by CGP. Conclusions: cMcl-1 overexpression appears to occur independently from MCL1 gene amplification in NSCLC and correlates with AIS histologic type, lower tumor grade, smaller tumor size, nonrecurrent disease, and increased survival.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):27-30
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_731_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Expression of breast cancer type 1 and its relation with expression of
           estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, and human epidermal growth
           factor receptor 2/neu in breast carcinoma on trucut biopsy specimens

    • Authors: Deepti Verma, Kiran Agarwal, Sanjeev Kumar Tudu
      Pages: 31 - 38
      Abstract: Deepti Verma, Kiran Agarwal, Sanjeev Kumar Tudu
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):31-38
      Objective: (1) The objective is to study the immunohistochemical expression of Breast cancer type 1 (BRCA1) in breast carcinoma on trucut biopsy specimens and (2) To relate its expression with that of estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2)/neu and the clinicopathological parameters. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional hospital-based study was performed in Lady Hardinge Medical College and Shrimati Sucheta Kriplani Hospital, New Delhi, with collaboration of the Departments of Pathology and Surgery from the period of November 2008 to March 2010. Materials and Methods: The study group included 54 cytologically proven cases of breast carcinoma. The immunohistochemical expression of BRCA1 was studied and related with expression of ER, PR, and HER-2/neu on their trucut biopsies. Results: The altered expression of BRCA1 (i.e., reduced or absent expression) was seen in 44.4% cases of breast carcinoma while 55.6% had positive expression. About 83% of breast carcinomas with altered BRCA1 expression were larger than 3 cm in size. The breast carcinomas showing altered expression were found to be mostly high grade (63.6%). This was statistically significant. The ER and PR negativity were seen in 62.5% and 79.2% breast carcinomas with altered BRCA1 expression, respectively. The score 3 positivity of HER-2/neu was more common among carcinomas with altered BRCA1 expression (21% vs. 16.7%). The triple negativity was found in 41.7% breast carcinomas having altered BRCA1 expression. This was statistically significant. Conclusion: The combination of immunohistochemical expression of BRCA1, ER, PR, and HER-2/neu and clinicopathological details may be helpful in predicting the individuals more likely to carry BRCA1 mutations and thus selecting the candidate and family members for genetic screening for BRCA1 mutations.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):31-38
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_393_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Immunohistochemical evaluation of lymphovascular invasion in carcinoma
           breast with CD34 and D2-40 and its correlation with other prognostic
           markers

    • Authors: Sonal Agarwal, Amarjit Singh, Permeet Kaur Bagga
      Pages: 39 - 44
      Abstract: Sonal Agarwal, Amarjit Singh, Permeet Kaur Bagga
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):39-44
      Background: Carcinoma breast is ever-evolving and becoming increasingly prevalent in India. Numerous prognostic factors based on morphology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) have been established which need to be interconnected to give patients best possible treatment. Aims: This study aims to confirm and analyze lymphovascular invasion (LVI) detected by hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) using IHC with CD34 and D2-40 and its correlation with other biologic and morphologic prognostic markers. Settings and Design: This was a prospective study. Materials and Methods: Fifty mastectomy specimens diagnosed as infiltrating ductal carcinoma breast on histopathology selected for the study. Evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections was done using H and E and IHC for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 HER2/neu receptors, CD34, and D2-40 endothelial markers. Correlation of LVI done with prognostic markers of Carcinoma Breast, namely, age of the patient, tumor size, Nottingham grade, lymph node ratio (LNR), Nottingham prognostic index (NPI), ER/PR status, and HER2/neu status. CD34 and D2-40 utilized to distinguish blood vessel, lymph vessel, and retraction artifacts and to calculate lymphatic microvessel density (LMVD) and blood microvessel density (BMVD). Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS Software Package. Results: LVI was associated with younger age (P = 0.001), greater tumor size (P = 0.007), higher Nottingham grade (P = 0.001), higher LNR (P = 0.001), higher NPI (P = 0.001), Negative ER Status (P = 0.001), Negative PR Status (P = 0.002), Positive HER2/neu status (P = 0.021), Higher Intratumoral BMVD (P = 0.016), Peritumoral BMVD (P = 0.001), and Intratumoral LMVD (P = 0.009). Blood vessels more commonly invaded than lymph vessels. Retraction artifacts can be mistaken for LVI without IHC. Conclusions: D2-40 is a promising marker for lymphatic endothelium. LVI is a poor prognostic marker hence should be evaluated imperatively in all cases of carcinoma breast.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):39-44
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_791_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Liquid-based cytology versus conventional cytology in fine-needle
           aspirates of salivary gland neoplasms

    • Authors: Madhu Kumar, Shweta Katiyar, Mala Sagar, Malti Kumari, Madhu Mati Goel
      Pages: 45 - 49
      Abstract: Madhu Kumar, Shweta Katiyar, Mala Sagar, Malti Kumari, Madhu Mati Goel
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):45-49
      Background: Liquid-based cytology (LBC) is a method of retrieving and processing of cytological material for the assessment of both gynecological and nongynecological cases introduced in 1996. Mostly conventional smears (CS) are prepared in Indian scenario; however, due to increasing popularity of LBC in nongynecology specimens, LBC is also used in few centers for diagnosing salivary gland neoplasm. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare CS and LBC in fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the salivary gland neoplasms in terms of cytomorphological details, adequacy, ease of interpretation, pitfalls, and diagnostic efficiency. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, observational, comparative study which included 64 salivary gland neoplasms. Both CS and LBC (SurePath) were prepared as per standard protocols and examined. Results and Conclusion: In our study, specificity and positive predictive value of both the techniques (conventional and LBC) were found to be 100%. Sensitivity of both the techniques was found to be similar (66.7%). Negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of conventional technique were found to be almost similar to that of LBC technique (97.6% vs. 97.2% and 97.7% vs. 97.4%). In terms of adequacy and cellularity, CSs were better than LBC. Ease of interpretation was better with CSs due to abundant chondromyxoid stroma, an important clue in the diagnosis of pleomorphic adenoma. Nuclear details and background were better in LBC as compared to CS. Hence, we conclude that in salivary gland FNAC, both CS and LBC have similar diagnostic efficiency. however, interpretation of conventional smears is easier than Liquid Based Cytology especially in cases of pleomorphic adenoma. However, some advantages of LBC in respect to conventional cytology, with better-preserved morphology obtained from LBC becomes furthermore obligatory.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):45-49
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_729_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Utility of CD200 expression and CD20 antibody binding capacity in
           differentiating chronic lymphocytic leukemia from other chronic
           lymphoproliferative disorders

    • Authors: R Poongodi, Neelam Varma, Shano Naseem, Bose Parveen, Subhash Varma
      Pages: 50 - 57
      Abstract: R Poongodi, Neelam Varma, Shano Naseem, Bose Parveen, Subhash Varma
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):50-57
      Background: Chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (CLPDs) are heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical presentations and outcomes. Therefore, accurate classification is crucial for treatment planning. At present, flow cytometry immunophenotyping (FCM-IPT) is a useful tool for diagnosing these diseases. However, overlapping immunophenotypes do exist. Recently, differential expression of CD200 and variation in number of CD20 antibody bound per cell (ABC) in different CLPDs has been reported. Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven CLPD cases were analyzed by FCM-IPT for CD200 expression, and Quantibrite bead was used to calculate CD20 ABC. Results: Variability in CD200 expression can help in the differentiation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and hairy cell leukemia (HCL) from other CLPDs. CD200 was brightly expressed in 100% CLL cases, having homogenous bright (2+) intensity. On the contrary, CD200 was uniformly negative in all Mantle cell lymphoma cases except 1, in which the intensity was dim, and the mean fluorescence intensity was significantly lower than CLL. Furthermore, all HCL cases showed bright expression of CD200, thereby making it useful in differentiation from other CLPD with villous lymphocytes. Evaluation of CD20 ABC showed that it differs among various CLPD and was significantly lowest in CLL and highest in HCL both on peripheral blood and bone marrow samples. Conclusion: Our results support the fact that CD200 can be added to routine CLPD panel as it is useful in subcategorizing them. However, inclusion of CD20 ABC to routine panel does not seem plausible but may be done for difficult diagnostic cases or where anti-CD20 therapy is planned.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):50-57
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_267_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Applicability of 2008 World Health Organization classification system of
           hematolymphoid neoplasms: Learning experiences

    • Authors: Sushil Modkharkar, Pooja Navale, Pratibha Kadam Amare, Anuradha Chougule, Nikhil Patkar, Prashant Tembhare, Hari Menon, Manju Sengar, Navin Khattry, Shripad Banavali, Brijesh Arora, Gaurav Narula, Siddhartha Laskar, Nehal Khanna, Mary Ann Muckaden, Venkatesh Rangarajan, Archi Agrawal, Tanuja Shet, Sridhar Epari, PG Subramanian, Sumeet Gujral
      Pages: 58 - 65
      Abstract: Sushil Modkharkar, Pooja Navale, Pratibha Kadam Amare, Anuradha Chougule, Nikhil Patkar, Prashant Tembhare, Hari Menon, Manju Sengar, Navin Khattry, Shripad Banavali, Brijesh Arora, Gaurav Narula, Siddhartha Laskar, Nehal Khanna, Mary Ann Muckaden, Venkatesh Rangarajan, Archi Agrawal, Tanuja Shet, Sridhar Epari, PG Subramanian, Sumeet Gujral
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):58-65
      Background: 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of hematolymphoid neoplasms (HLN) has classified them based on morphology, results of various ancillary techniques, and clinical features.[1] There are no studies looking at the applicability of WHO classification. Aims: The aim of the study was to calculate proportions of all HLN subtypes seen during 1-year period based on 2008 WHO classification of HLN and study applicability and also shortcomings of practices in a tertiary care center in India. Materials and Methods: This was a 1-year retrospective study (January 1st, to December 31st, 2010) where cases were identified using hospital/laboratory electronic records. Old follow-up and referral cases were excluded from the study. Only newly diagnosed cases classified into categories laid down by 2008 WHO classification of HLN included. Results: Out of 2118 newly diagnosed classifiable cases, 1602 (75.6%) cases were of lymphoid neoplasms, 489 (23.1%) cases of myeloid neoplasms, 16 (0.8%) cases of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms, and 11 (0.5%) cases of acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage. Overall, most common HLN subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 361, 17.0%). Precursor B-lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma (n = 177, 48.2%) was the most common subtype within pediatric age group. Conclusions: All major subtypes of HLN were seen at our center and showed trends almost similar to those seen in other Indian studies. Molecular/cytogenetic studies could not be performed on a significant number of cases owing to logistic reasons (unavailability of complete panels and also cost-related issues) and such cases could not be classified as per the WHO classification system.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):58-65
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_56_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • CagA and VacA genes of Helicobacter pylori and their clinical relevance

    • Authors: Lavanya Jeyamani, Jayalakshmi Jayarajan, Venkatakrishnan Leelakrishnan, Mukundan Swaminathan
      Pages: 66 - 69
      Abstract: Lavanya Jeyamani, Jayalakshmi Jayarajan, Venkatakrishnan Leelakrishnan, Mukundan Swaminathan
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):66-69
      Context: Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of a variety of gastroduodenal diseases which varies with ethnicity and the type of strains that infect the population. Aims: This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes in our region and to determine their relationship to the severity of the lesions that they cause. Settings and Design: This study was an observational cross-sectional study. Subjects and Methods: DNA was extracted from 165 gastric biopsies from patients evaluated for dyspepsia. PCR was used to detect cagA and vacA (s1, s2, m1, m2) genes of H. pylori. Statistical analysis of associations was performed between endoscopy findings and virulence genes. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson Chi-square test and Fischer's exact test. Results: The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 37% and the dominant genotypes was vacA s1 cagA-positive strain (54.1%) in this study. The vacAs1 subtype was found in all patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD). The entire normal study group had VacA s2 variant only. This clearly shows that vacA s1 is a significant virulence marker and patients harboring s1 strains are more prone to develop ulcers (P = 0.007). There was a significant association of cagA with s1 strain rather than s2. Variation in VacA m genotype did not seem to have any association with disease status. There was a statistically significant association between the presence of cagA gene and PUD rather than the nonulcer dyspepsia (P = 0.027). Conclusion: The predominant genotype in our population was cagA positive vacA s1, which was found to be significantly associated with patients with gastric diseases, especially PUD. VacA s1 can serve as a single best virulence marker of the disease manifestation.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):66-69
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_234_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Role of nm23H1 in predicting metastases in prostatic carcinoma

    • Authors: Arvind Kumar, Deepa Hatwal, Neha Batra, Nidhi Verma
      Pages: 70 - 75
      Abstract: Arvind Kumar, Deepa Hatwal, Neha Batra, Nidhi Verma
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):70-75
      Background: Non-metastatic nm23H1 gene is thought to play a critical role in cell proliferation. Studies of nm23H1 have been done in many other malignancies. But none of these studies took up nm23H1 gene as predictor in the metastases of prostatic carcinoma. Aims and Objectives: To study the expression of nm23H1 in prostatic lesion and to correlate nm23H1 expression with presence of metastases, tumour stage, tumour grade and with PSA level serum. Setting and Design: Tertiary hospital based retrospective and prospective study done in a period of one year from thirty patients having prostatic lesion confirmed by biopsy. Material and Methods: Immunohistochemistry for nm23H1 was performed on unstained coated sections of prostatic lesions to study the relation with prostatic lesion and their correlation with age, PSA level, tumour stage, grading. Clinical data was collected from medical records. Statistical Analysis: SPSS Version 15 analysis software was used. The value were presented in number(%) and Mean ± SD. Results: Majority of patients belong to age group 61 to 70yrs.Gleason score >7 were seen in 55% of patients of adenocarcinoma with and without metastasis. The difference in PSA levels between BPH and adenocarcinoma was significant (P < 0.001). IHC expression for nm23H1 gene showed positive findings in all the cases (P = 1). PSA values >20ng/ml showed maximum % mean expression (98.64%) as compared to PSA levels <10 ng/ml (96.91%). Conclusion: IHC expression of nm23H1 is not an effective tool to distinguish among the cases of BPH, adenocarcinoma of prostate with and without metastasis. Hence nm23H1 gene does not behave like an antimetastatic gene in prostatic lesions.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):70-75
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_520_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Prevalence of scrub typhus in pyrexia of unknown origin and assessment of
           interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma levels in
           scrub typhus-positive patients

    • Authors: Meher Rizvi, Asfia Sultan, Madhav Chowdhry, Mohd Azam, Fatima Khan, Indu Shukla, Haris M Khan
      Pages: 76 - 80
      Abstract: Meher Rizvi, Asfia Sultan, Madhav Chowdhry, Mohd Azam, Fatima Khan, Indu Shukla, Haris M Khan
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):76-80
      Background: Scrub typhus is lesser known cause of fever of unknown origin in India. Even if there have been reports documenting the prevalence of scrub typhus in different parts of India, it is still an unknown entity, and clinicians usually do not consider it as differential diagnosis. The present study was performed to document the prevalence of scrub typhus among febrile patients in western part of Uttar Pradesh and to assess the clinical profile of infected patients on the one hand and knowledge, attitude, and practices among clinicians on the other. Materials and Methods: A total of 357 adult patients with fever of more than 5-day duration were recruited. All patients underwent complete physical examination, and detailed clinical history was elicited as per predesigned pro forma. After primary screening to rule out malaria, enteric fever, and leptospirosis infection, secondary screening for scrub typhus was done by rapid screen test and IgM ELISA. Results: Scrub typhus infection was positive in 91 (25.5%) cases. The most common symptoms among the patients were fever (100%), pain in abdomen (79.1%), pedal edema 56 (61.5%), rash 44 (48.3%), headache 44 (48.3%), vomiting 42 (46.1%), constipation 33 (36.2%), cough 28 (30.7%), and lymphadenopathy 20 (21.9%). The median values of interleukin-8, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in healthy controls were 15.54 pg/ml, 7.77 pg/ml, and 54.1 pg/ml, respectively, while the median values of these cytokines in scrub typhus-positive patients were 21.04 pg/ml, 8.74 pg/ml, and 73.8 pg/ml, respectively. Conclusion: Our results highlight that scrub typhus infection is an important cause of pyrexia of unknown origin, and active surveillance is necessary to assess the exact magnitude and distribution of the disease.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):76-80
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_644_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of procalcitonin as a diagnostic marker in neonatal sepsis

    • Authors: Marie Victor Pravin Charles, Ramakrishnan Kalaivani, Soma Venkatesh, Arunava Kali, Kunigal Srinivasiah Seetha
      Pages: 81 - 84
      Abstract: Marie Victor Pravin Charles, Ramakrishnan Kalaivani, Soma Venkatesh, Arunava Kali, Kunigal Srinivasiah Seetha
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):81-84
      Context: Neonatal sepsis is an early infection occurring within 28 days of the postnatal life. It has nonspecific signs and symptoms which make the diagnosis cumbersome. It inflicts an increase in morbidity and mortality among neonates. Procalcitonin (PCT) is yet another acute phase reactant, which is synthesized by the C-cells of thyroid gland. Aims: The aim of our study is to evaluate PCT as a diagnostic marker of neonatal sepsis in comparison with C-reactive protein (CRP). Subjects and Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at our tertiary care hospital in Puducherry. The study was conducted over a period of 5 months from November 2015 to 2016. The study included all neonates with clinical signs of sepsis. The neonates were assigned into three groups as proven sepsis, suspected sepsis, and no sepsis group. The CRP level and PCT level were compared between the three groups, and their sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Statistical Analysis Used: The mean, standard deviation, and standard error of mean were calculated. The groups were compared using one-way ANOVA. The diagnostic test efficiency was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: A total of 75 neonates were included in our study. There were 9 (12%) neonates with proven clinical sepsis, 47 (62.6%) neonates with suspected clinical sepsis, and 19 (25.3%) neonates with no sepsis. The mean and standard error of mean were calculated for CRP and PCT in all the three groups. The results showed a sensitivity of 88.90% for both CRP and PCT and specificity of 89.40% for CRP and 80.30% for PCT. The common organisms isolated from culture-positive group were Escherichia coli (22.2%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22.2%), and Candida albicans (22.2%), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions: PCT may not be sufficiently used as a sole marker of sepsis in neonates compared to CRP. PCT in conjunction with CRP and other tests for septic screen can aid in better diagnosis of neonatal sepsis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):81-84
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_820_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A perplexing primary novel hilar lesion: Remember the pneumonic PPNHL!

    • Authors: Ketaki Utpat, Unnati D Desai, Gayathri Amonkar, Jyotsna M Joshi
      Pages: 85 - 89
      Abstract: Ketaki Utpat, Unnati D Desai, Gayathri Amonkar, Jyotsna M Joshi
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):85-89
      A 60-year-old female presented with dyspnea, cough, and chest pain with a left hilar mass lesion. In our case, clinicoradiological correlation, bronchoscopy, and computed tomography-guided biopsy revealed the diagnosis of primary pulmonary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (PPNHL) on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. We discuss the approach to hilar masses. PPNHL is a rare malignant lymphoma most common being mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Various therapeutic options are available. The chemotherapy regimen consisting of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisolone) is preferred.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):85-89
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_71_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Utility of MOC-31 monoclonal antibody in differentiating metastatic
           adenocarcinoma cells and reactive mesothelial cells in effusion cytology

    • Authors: Bharat Patil, Vitaladevuni Shivkumar, Nitin Gangane
      Pages: 90 - 93
      Abstract: Bharat Patil, Vitaladevuni Shivkumar, Nitin Gangane
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):90-93
      In effusion cytology, a clear distinction between reactive mesothelial cells and metastatic adenocarcinoma cells is sometimes challenging mainly due to similarities in the cytomorphological features. In such cases for definitive diagnosis, paraffin-embedded cell block examination and immunohistochemistry are helpful in making this distinction. MOC-31 is one of the proposed immunomarker for adenocarcinoma cells. We undertook to evaluate the role of MOC-31 as a marker for identifying adenocarcinoma cells in effusion specimen. A total of 185 paraffin-embedded cell blocks of effusion samples were identified, of these 111 cases were of metastatic adenocarcinoma. MOC-31 was positive in 101 of the 111 cases of metastatic adenocarcinoma. Minimal focal cytoplasmic staining was also seen in 7 of the 74 cases of reactive mesothelial cells, but these were taken negative as they did not show membrane positivity. The sensitivity and specificity of MOC-31 for metastatic adenocarcinoma cells were 92.5%, and 100% respectively, positive and negative predictive value (NPV) was 100% and 91.14%, respectively. MOC-31 can be used as a reliable marker in effusions for distinguishing metastatic adenocarcinoma from reactive mesothelial cases.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):90-93
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_86_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Sporadic lymphangioleiomyomatosis with multiple atypical features: A case
           report and literature review

    • Authors: Xiaokang Wang, Fei Su, Fenfang Zhou, Maohui Feng
      Pages: 94 - 97
      Abstract: Xiaokang Wang, Fei Su, Fenfang Zhou, Maohui Feng
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):94-97
      Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare, genetically determined, progressive interstitial lung disease, which almost exclusively affects women, especially at the childbearing age. The initial symptoms and radiographic changes in a patient with LAM are always associated with the respiratory system. Here, we present a case of mediastinal and abdominal LAM of a 22-year-old male, where LAM cells are negative for human melanoma black-45 ( HMB-45). The report of this uncharacterized LAM case will make a significant contribution to the realization of LAM associated clinical features, diagnostic approaches, and its afterward treatments.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):94-97
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_843_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Coats&#39; disease - disease of the eye rarely encountered by
           pathologists

    • Authors: Hilda Fernandes, T Umashankar, Anto J Richie, Sunayana Hegde
      Pages: 98 - 100
      Abstract: Hilda Fernandes, T Umashankar, Anto J Richie, Sunayana Hegde
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):98-100
      Coats' Disease is an idiopathic condition of the eye affecting young children although it can be seen in adults. Most patients present early in life with unilateral decreased vision, strabismus or leukocoria. The most important differential diagnosis is unilateral retinoblastoma. In this study we report a case of coat's disease in an young girl, and evaluate histopathological and clinical findings.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):98-100
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_826_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Merkel cell carcinoma with seborrheic keratosis: A unique association

    • Authors: Murthy S Anand, Shantha Krishnamurthy, Suvarna Ravindranath, Jyothi Ranganathan
      Pages: 101 - 102
      Abstract: Murthy S Anand, Shantha Krishnamurthy, Suvarna Ravindranath, Jyothi Ranganathan
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):101-102
      Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, clinically aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin; MCC is 40 times less common as compared to melanoma. The most frequently reported sites have been the head and neck, extremities, and trunk. Potential mimics include malignant melanoma, lymphoma, or metastatic small cell (neuroendocrine) carcinomas. Histopathology of MCC resembles small cell carcinoma both morphologically and on IHC. The possible cell of origin was proposed as the Merkel cell, which functions as a mechanoreceptor. It has a high chance of local recurrence, regional and distant spread. In recent times, Merkel cell polyomavirus has been implicated as the causative agent for this tumor. The same agent has a reported etiologic association with other skin lesions, including seborrheic keratosis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):101-102
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_659_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Invasive cutaneous mucormycosis in a preterm neonate presenting as a
           vesicobullous lesion

    • Authors: Shashank Mishra, Divya Shelly, Divya Gupta, Reena Bharadwaj
      Pages: 103 - 105
      Abstract: Shashank Mishra, Divya Shelly, Divya Gupta, Reena Bharadwaj
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):103-105
      Mucormycosis is a relatively rare fungal infection seen in immunocompromised patients. Very few cases of invasive cutaneous mucormycosis occurring in neonates have been reported in literature. It is an aggressive disease with a mortality rate of around 64% in neonates, so a high index of suspicion is essential for rapid diagnosis and definitive treatment with broad-spectrum antifungals such as Amphotericin B. We present a case of a premature infant born at 25 weeks of gestation who developed vesicobullous lesions all over the body on day 5 of life. Biopsy from the vesicles confirmed the presence of angioinvasive fungal hyphae of mucormycosis which were highlighted on Periodic acid-Schiff and Grocott stain.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):103-105
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_796_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Syringocystadenoma papilliferum and trichoblastoma arising in the nevus
           sebaceous

    • Authors: Feifei Wang, Yatong Wu, Zhancai Zheng, Yanping Bai
      Pages: 106 - 108
      Abstract: Feifei Wang, Yatong Wu, Zhancai Zheng, Yanping Bai
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):106-108
      Nevus sebaceous (NS) is a clinically common benign tumor and has a high potential to develop into a great diversity of neoplasms of epidermal and adnexal origins. However, it is a rare phenomenon of the coexistence in a single NS with two or more skin tumors. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman with two kinds of neoplastic proliferation including syringocystadenoma papilliferum and trichoblastoma arising in NS on the scalp.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):106-108
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_613_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in an unconscious diabetic
           patient with dermatomyositis

    • Authors: Meysam Sharifdini, Aniseh Hesari, Seif Ali Mahdavi, Akram Alipour, Eshrat Beigom Kia
      Pages: 109 - 112
      Abstract: Meysam Sharifdini, Aniseh Hesari, Seif Ali Mahdavi, Akram Alipour, Eshrat Beigom Kia
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):109-112
      A case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in a patient with dermatomyositis and diabetes mellitus is herein reported. The case was a 60-year-old female admitted due to watery diarrhea and unconsciousness. She had a 10-year history of chronic immunosuppressive therapy including methotrexate and prednisolone for dermatomyositis. Stool parasitological examination revealed numerous rhabditiform larvae of threadworm “S. stercoralis.” Larva in stool sample was characterized by sequencing of mitochondrial DNA. After treatment with ivermectin, the patient recovered without evidence of S. stercoralis in follow-up stool samples. In endemic areas, stool examination for detection of S. stercoralis should be performed on a regular basis for all patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, as early detection and treatment are necessary to minimize complications of severe strongyloidiasis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):109-112
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_734_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Kikuchi's disease (histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis): A rare
           presentation with acute kidney injury, peripheral neuropathy, and aseptic
           meningitis with cutaneous involvement

    • Authors: Jyoti Jain, Shashank Banait, Iadarilang Tiewsoh, Madhura Choudhari
      Pages: 113 - 115
      Abstract: Jyoti Jain, Shashank Banait, Iadarilang Tiewsoh, Madhura Choudhari
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):113-115
      Kikuchi's disease (KD) also known as histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis is rare, idiopathic, generally self-limited cause of lymphadenitis. We present a case of twenty year young female who presented in critically ill state with fever, cervical and axillary lymphadenopathy, rash, vomiting and altered sensorium and found to have neurological, hepatic, renal and dermatological involvement. Kikuchi's disease should be considered in differential diagnosis of fever and lymphadenopathy and though benign can sometimes present with multi-organ involvement. It is because of rarity of this disease with unusual complications, present case is reported.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):113-115
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_256_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Autopsy findings in an atypical case of occult massive fatal pulmonary
           embolism in a backdrop of hyperhomocysteinemia

    • Authors: Pratibha Misra, Arijit Kumar Ghosh, Aneeta Jassar
      Pages: 116 - 119
      Abstract: Pratibha Misra, Arijit Kumar Ghosh, Aneeta Jassar
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):116-119
      A 43-year-old apparently healthy male presented with fever and presyncope. He was suspected to have massive pulmonary thromboembolism based on the clinico-biochemical profile. Despite aggressive thrombolytic therapy, he succumbed to his illness within 12 h of admission. Postmortem examination showed massive pulmonary thromboembolism and hyperhomocysteinemia with low high-density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol with antemortem blood sample. Herein, we report autopsy findings in a rare case of a young male with occult massive pulmonary thromboembolism without deep vein thrombosis, who had an atypical clinical presentation and was found to have underlying hyperhomocysteinemia and decreased HDLc. An acute, massive PE can present a diagnostic challenge due to the rate and severity of decompensation seen in afflicted patients. A high index of suspicion is required for early detection of pulmonary embolism in a young patient with atypical presentation and without obvious risk factors.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):116-119
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_165_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Anastomosing hemangioma with extensive fatty stroma in the retroperitoneum

    • Authors: Ananthvikas Jayaram, Marie Therese Manipadam, Paul Mazhuvanchary Jacob
      Pages: 120 - 122
      Abstract: Ananthvikas Jayaram, Marie Therese Manipadam, Paul Mazhuvanchary Jacob
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):120-122
      Anastomosing hemangiomas are a recently recognized benign vascular neoplasm, first described by Montgomery and Epstein in 2009. A few cases have been described in the genitourinary tract, especially in the renal hilum. These are fairly well-demarcated lesions with lobules of sinusoidal-like capillaries lined by hobnail endothelial cells containing eosinophilic hyaline globules in the cytoplasm. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been described in a few cases, along with large feeding vessels. A predominant adipocytic component has been described in only one case.[9] We describe a case of a retroperitoneal anastomosing hemangioma occurring in an extrarenal site in a 53-year-old female, followed by a review of the current literature.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):120-122
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_259_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Mixed epithelial and stromal tumor – A solid-cystic renal neoplasm
           undergoing malignant transformation: A rare case report

    • Authors: Urmila N Khadilkar, Sridevi H Basavaiah, GG Laxman Prabhu, Rohit Tapadia, BH Rakesh
      Pages: 123 - 126
      Abstract: Urmila N Khadilkar, Sridevi H Basavaiah, GG Laxman Prabhu, Rohit Tapadia, BH Rakesh
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):123-126
      We present a case of 53-year-old female who came with the complaints of mass on the right side of the abdomen noticed 3 weeks back. There was no history of localized swelling or rise of temperature, no history of weight loss, or evening rise of temperature. On examination, there was a flank mass which was bimanually palpable and tender. Routine laboratory investigations were within normal limits, except for the presence of hematuria in routine urinalysis. Computed tomography scan abdomen revealed a large multiloculated solid-cystic mass lesion with septation in the right-sided kidney. Cystic renal cell carcinoma was suspected and conventional open right radical nephrectomy was done. Grossly, the tumor was solid-cystic containing blood-tinged fluid. Microscopy revealed a complex tumor with both epithelial and stromal proliferation and with the aid of immunohistochemistry a diagnosis of mixed epithelial and stromal tumor undergoing malignant transformation was concluded.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):123-126
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_627_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A rare case of primary female urethral adenocarcinoma: Columnar type with
           colonic adenocarcinoma features

    • Authors: Prithal Gangadhar, Muktha R Pai, I Sandhya
      Pages: 127 - 130
      Abstract: Prithal Gangadhar, Muktha R Pai, I Sandhya
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):127-130
      Female urethral carcinoma is extremely rare and accounts for 0.02% of all women's cancers and <1% of cancers in the female genitourinary tract. Adenocarcinoma accounts for only 10% of urethral carcinomas in females. Due to their location, presentation is usually late and tumors are often missed on physical examination. As in this case, nonspecific symptoms in the early stages may delay the diagnosis in most patients. Herein, we present an extremely rare case of the columnar type of primary female urethral adenocarcinoma exhibiting colonic adenocarcinoma features which to the authors' best knowledge has not been reported to date. The present study emphasizes the importance of a careful clinical examination and also highlights the role of imaging studies, and biopsy in making an accurate preoperative diagnosis of this rare disease. The disease may have devastating sequelae due to local and metastatic involvement if not recognized and treated earlier.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):127-130
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_745_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex cord tumor: Histomorphological
           features

    • Authors: Abha Thakur, Veena Malhotra, Seema Sachan, Aanchal Aggarwal
      Pages: 131 - 133
      Abstract: Abha Thakur, Veena Malhotra, Seema Sachan, Aanchal Aggarwal
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):131-133
      Uterine tumors resembling ovarian sex cord tumors are rare neoplasms with varied histological and immunophenotypic profile, uncertain histiogenesis and biological behavior. A critical evaluation of histological features is essential for diagnosis and management of these cases.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):131-133
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_702_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Primary rhabdomyosarcoma in ovary &#8211; Pathologist clinches it
           all

    • Authors: Ilavarasi Vanidassane, Sunil Kumar, Sudhakar Gunasekar, Sandeep R Mathur, Ravi Phulware, Sameer Rastogi
      Pages: 134 - 136
      Abstract: Ilavarasi Vanidassane, Sunil Kumar, Sudhakar Gunasekar, Sandeep R Mathur, Ravi Phulware, Sameer Rastogi
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):134-136
      Sarcomas are extremely complex and heterogeneous group of malignancies. However, exact categorization of the type of sarcoma is essential for the individualized approach for a given patient. It is mandatory that sarcomas should be treated in tertiary care centers with good pathology support and expertise. Here, we present an apt example of a young girl with large abdominal mass which was diagnosed as ovarian rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Besides, her excellent response to RMS regimen further reinforces the findings.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):134-136
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_548_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Diminished CD40L expression on T-cells in a case of disseminated
           cryptococcosis

    • Authors: Supreet Kumar Mohanty, Deepshi Thakral, Devika Gupta, Prabin Kumar, Dipendra Kumar Mitra
      Pages: 137 - 140
      Abstract: Supreet Kumar Mohanty, Deepshi Thakral, Devika Gupta, Prabin Kumar, Dipendra Kumar Mitra
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):137-140
      X-linked hyperimmunoglobulin M (HIGM) syndrome may increase the susceptibility of patients to disseminated cryptococcal infections primarily due to CD40L deficiency that causes defective cross talk between T- and B-cells, thus preventing class switching. In HIGM syndrome, serum IgM levels are elevated with severe reduction in serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA levels. In addition, the expression of CD40L (CD154) on in vitro-activated T-cells is severely reduced or absent. Here, we describe a rare, and perhaps, the first reported case in India of a 3-year-old male child with X-linked HIGM immunodeficiency syndrome who developed disseminated Cryptococcosis. Evaluation of the serum IgG profile of the patient revealed increased serum IgM levels with reduced IgG and IgA levels. Both the frequency and the function of T-cells, primarily CD40L on activated T-cells, showed weak expression suggestive of HIGM syndrome.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):137-140
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_761_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Nontuberculous mycobacterial empyema in an immunocompetent child

    • Authors: Ira Shah, Forum Shah
      Pages: 141 - 142
      Abstract: Ira Shah, Forum Shah
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):141-142
      Nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) species are mycobacterial species other than those belonging to the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium leprae. There are very few reports of NTM in immunocompetent children causing empyema. In this article, we report a 9-year-old immunocompetent girl who presented with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare empyema.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):141-142
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_586_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Chondroid syringoma with extensive cystic change and focal
           syringometaplasia: A rare histomorphological finding

    • Authors: Akanksha Jain, Sudheer Arava
      Pages: 143 - 144
      Abstract: Akanksha Jain, Sudheer Arava
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):143-144

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):143-144
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_539_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Diffuse esophageal submucosal retention cysts: An autopsy happenstance

    • Authors: Mona Agnihotri, Pradeep Vaideeswar
      Pages: 145 - 146
      Abstract: Mona Agnihotri, Pradeep Vaideeswar
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):145-146

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):145-146
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_346_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Hypernucleate plasma cell: A rare morphological finding

    • Authors: Anurag Gupta, Manu Goyal, Anil Aribandi
      Pages: 147 - 148
      Abstract: Anurag Gupta, Manu Goyal, Anil Aribandi
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):147-148

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):147-148
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_374_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Multiple myeloma or lymphoma? The increasing role of flow cytometry and
           serum-free light chain assay

    • Authors: Nabhajit Mallik, Ram Vasudevan Nampoothiri, Sreejesh Sreedharanunni, Man Updesh Singh Sachdeva, Pankaj Malhotra, Neelam Varma
      Pages: 149 - 150
      Abstract: Nabhajit Mallik, Ram Vasudevan Nampoothiri, Sreejesh Sreedharanunni, Man Updesh Singh Sachdeva, Pankaj Malhotra, Neelam Varma
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):149-150

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):149-150
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_381_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Intestinal spirochetosis: The hue is the cue

    • Authors: Purnima Malhotra, Minakshi Bhardwaj
      Pages: 151 - 152
      Abstract: Purnima Malhotra, Minakshi Bhardwaj
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):151-152

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):151-152
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_740_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Mobile whole slide imaging with Indian twist

    • Authors: Himanshu Dilip Mulay, Anil K Reddy, Balasaheb R Yelikar
      Pages: 153 - 154
      Abstract: Himanshu Dilip Mulay, Anil K Reddy, Balasaheb R Yelikar
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):153-154

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):153-154
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_603_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • An unusual presentation of multiple congenital melanocytic nevi with a
           whole-body distribution

    • Authors: Hai-Peng Liu, Duo Zhang
      Pages: 155 - 156
      Abstract: Hai-Peng Liu, Duo Zhang
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):155-156

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):155-156
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_477_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Suprasellar schwannoma: A rare occurence

    • Authors: Urmi Mukherjee, Nayana Patil, Anuj Khurana
      Pages: 156 - 157
      Abstract: Urmi Mukherjee, Nayana Patil, Anuj Khurana
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):156-157

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):156-157
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_819_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Primary orbital plasmacytoma: An unusual presentation in an adolescent

    • Authors: Sudha Sharma, Rajwant Kaur, Amanjit Bal, Sandeep Mohindra, Ritu Aggarwal
      Pages: 158 - 159
      Abstract: Sudha Sharma, Rajwant Kaur, Amanjit Bal, Sandeep Mohindra, Ritu Aggarwal
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):158-159

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):158-159
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_378_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Clear cell myeloma artefactual or real

    • Authors: Vinita Pandey, Yasmeen Khatib, Archana Laxman Khade, Rahul Pandey, Manisha S Khare
      Pages: 159 - 161
      Abstract: Vinita Pandey, Yasmeen Khatib, Archana Laxman Khade, Rahul Pandey, Manisha S Khare
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):159-161

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):159-161
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_326_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Hyperheptaploidy in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    • Authors: Mohit Chowdhry, Raj Nath Makroo, Yogita Thakur, Soma Agrawal, Manoj Mishra, Deepika Rani
      Pages: 161 - 162
      Abstract: Mohit Chowdhry, Raj Nath Makroo, Yogita Thakur, Soma Agrawal, Manoj Mishra, Deepika Rani
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):161-162

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):161-162
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_225_17
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Undiagnosed tubal high-grade serous carcinoma metastatic to synchronous
           benign ovarian Brenner tumor

    • Authors: Abhijit Chougule, Rashi Garg, Pranab Dey
      Pages: 162 - 164
      Abstract: Abhijit Chougule, Rashi Garg, Pranab Dey
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):162-164

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):162-164
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_600_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Multilocular peritoneal inclusion cyst, rare occurrence in men: A case
           report

    • Authors: Toshi Mishra, Manjusha M Karegar, Amey V Rojekar, Amita S Joshi
      Pages: 164 - 166
      Abstract: Toshi Mishra, Manjusha M Karegar, Amey V Rojekar, Amita S Joshi
      Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):164-166

      Citation: Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 2018 61(1):164-166
      PubDate: Thu,22 Mar 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPM.IJPM_480_16
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 1 (2018)
       
 
 
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