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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access  
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access  
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access  
Heart Views     Open Access  
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access  
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)

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Journal Cover CytoJournal
  [SJR: 0.339]   [H-I: 19]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1742-6413 - ISSN (Online) 1742-6413
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Evaluation of polymerase chain reaction in space-occupying lesions of
           liver reported as granulomatous inflammation/tuberculosis on fine-needle
           aspiration cytology

    • Authors: Kusum Sharma, Nalini Gupta, Kapil Goyal, Ajay Kumar Duseja, Aman Sharma, Arvind Rajwanshi
      Pages: 1 - 1
      Abstract: Kusum Sharma, Nalini Gupta, Kapil Goyal, Ajay Kumar Duseja, Aman Sharma, Arvind Rajwanshi
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):1-1
      Background: Tubercular involvement of the liver is uncommon, but is a serious consideration in differential diagnosis of granulomatous conditions, especially in endemic regions like India. Objective: To assess the role of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) done on archival cytological material in diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in cases reported as granulomatous inflammation/TB in liver lesions. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study including a total of 17 cases of liver space-occupying lesions (SOLs) reported as granulomatous inflammation (n = 12) and TB (n = 5). The smears were retrieved from the archives of the department and were reviewed for the cytomorphologic features. Air-dried smears stained with May–Grünwald–Giemsa (MGG) stain were assessed for the representative material in the form of epithelioid granulomas and giant cells. One/two MGG smears from each case were destained and the material was used for performing PCR for Mycobacterium tuberculosis by amplification of 123 bp fragment of the IS6110 insertion element. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 3 to 61 years. There were 12 females and 5 males. The patients presented with solitary/multiple liver SOLs. DNA could be extracted from 10/17 cases from archival MGG smears. PCR positivity was noted in 8/10 cases (including four acid-fast bacilli smear-positive cases), confirming a diagnosis of TB. Conclusion: Cytomorphology alone may not be sufficient for differentiating various granulomatous lesions reported in liver SOLs. DNA can be extracted from the archival cytological MGG-stained smears. PCR should be carried out if Ziehl–Neelsen staining is negative in granulomatous lesions, especially when material has not been submitted for culture.
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):1-1
      PubDate: Fri,20 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.198815
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Primary orbital mantle cell lymphoma: Flow cytometric immunophenotyping as
           an adjunct to fine-needle aspiration cytology for diagnosis

    • Authors: Sangeeta Verma, Nalini Gupta, Satyawati Mohindra, Manupdesh Singh Sachdeva, Arvind Rajwanshi
      Pages: 2 - 2
      Abstract: Sangeeta Verma, Nalini Gupta, Satyawati Mohindra, Manupdesh Singh Sachdeva, Arvind Rajwanshi
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):2-2

      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):2-2
      PubDate: Fri,20 Jan 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.198816
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Thyroid fine-needle aspiration of an immunocompromised patient:
           Cytomorphological clues

    • Authors: Longwen Chen, Nirvikar Dahiya, Matthew A Zarka
      Pages: 3 - 3
      Abstract: Longwen Chen, Nirvikar Dahiya, Matthew A Zarka
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):3-3

      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):3-3
      PubDate: Fri,24 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.200934
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Detection of BRAF mutation in the cytocentrifugation supernatant fluid
           from fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions may enhance the diagnostic
           yield

    • Authors: Ashley E Brown, Khin Sandar Lim, George Corpus, Martha T Hustek, Tien Anh N Tran, Chung-Che Chang
      Pages: 4 - 4
      Abstract: Ashley E Brown, Khin Sandar Lim, George Corpus, Martha T Hustek, Tien Anh N Tran, Chung-Che Chang
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):4-4
      Objective: BRAF mutations using cellular DNA from fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens are commonly used to support the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The goal of this study was to preliminarily evaluate the diagnostic utility of detecting BRAF mutations in the routinely discarded FNA specimen supernatant fluid. Materials and Methods: Seventy-eight FNAs of thyroid lesions were evaluated for BRAF mutations using both cellular and supernatant DNA. BRAF mutation data were correlated with cytology and surgical pathology. Results: Of the 78 samples evaluated, 68 (87%) had amplifiable DNA in the supernatant with 2 (3%) positive for BRAF mutations. These two samples showed no mutations in the cellular counterpart. Among the 11 samples showing morphologic findings (FNA/surgical pathology) suspicious/diagnostic of PTC, 6 (55%) samples (one supernatant and five cellulars) were positive for BRAF mutations. This suggests that testing supernatant DNA in FNA specimens may increase the diagnostic yield by 1/11 (9%) in this setting. Conclusions: The vast majority of routinely discarded FNA supernatants contain amplifiable DNA. In addition, profiling the mutations of BRAF and other genes using supernatant DNA may provide valuable diagnostic information to assist the diagnosis of PTC in patients with clinical/morphologic findings suspicious for malignancies and cellular DNA showing no mutations.
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):4-4
      PubDate: Fri,24 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.200935
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • KRAS detection on archival cytological smears by the novel fully automated
           polymerase chain reaction-based Idylla mutation test

    • Authors: Caterina De Luca, Elena Vigliar, Melania d'Anna, Pasquale Pisapia, Claudio Bellevicine, Umberto Malapelle, Giancarlo Troncone
      Pages: 5 - 5
      Abstract: Caterina De Luca, Elena Vigliar, Melania d'Anna, Pasquale Pisapia, Claudio Bellevicine, Umberto Malapelle, Giancarlo Troncone
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):5-5
      Background: Molecular techniques are relevant to modern cytopathology, but their implementation is difficult without molecular expertise and infrastructure. The assessment of KRAS mutational status on cytological preparations may be useful either to refine uncertain diagnoses on pancreatic aspirates or to yield predictive information to plan targeted treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The novel test Idylla™ enables fully automated KRAS genotyping in approximately 2 h, even in less experienced hands. Materials and Methods: This study aims to validate this methodology to detect KRAS mutations on archival cytological preparations of pancreatic cancer (n = 9) and mCRC (n = 9) by comparing the Idylla™ performance to that of standard real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: The same 11 mutations (n = 4: p.G12D; n = 2: p.G12V; n = 2: p.A59E/G/T; n = 1: p.G12R; n = 1: p.G13D; n = 1: p.Q61H) were detected by both techniques. Conclusion: Even in less experienced laboratories, a cytopathologist may easily integrate morphological diagnostic report with accurate KRAS mutation detection, which is relevant for diagnostic and treatment decisions.
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):5-5
      PubDate: Fri,24 Feb 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.200936
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Falling under the umbrella cells: A single institutional experience and
           literature review of urothelial carcinoma presenting as a primary
           pancreatic mass on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    • Authors: Michael Chambers, Konrad Krall, Shantel Hébert-Magee
      Pages: 6 - 6
      Abstract: Michael Chambers, Konrad Krall, Shantel Hébert-Magee
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):6-6
      Metastases to the pancreas are much less common than primary pancreatic lesions, and there are few reports in the literature of metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) found in the pancreas. We report two cases of metastatic UC mimicking a primary pancreatic lesion. Two female patients, aged 48 and 83 years, presented with isolated pancreatic lesions causing obstructive jaundice suspicious for pancreatic adenocarcinoma and underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE). On cytopathology, the lesions were found to be UC, confirmed with immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. UC rarely metastasizes to the pancreas, and diagnosis through EUS-FNA can be challenging. However, the utilization of ROSE, dedicated cell block passes, and IHC have proved to be effective in obtaining this unusual pancreatic diagnosis by EUS-FNA.
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):6-6
      PubDate: Mon,20 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.202601
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Next-generation sequencing of non-small cell lung cancer using a
           customized, targeted sequencing panel: Emphasis on small biopsy and
           cytology

    • Authors: David M DiBardino, David W Rawson, Anjali Saqi, Jonas J Heymann, Carlos A Pagan, William A Bulman
      Pages: 7 - 7
      Abstract: David M DiBardino, David W Rawson, Anjali Saqi, Jonas J Heymann, Carlos A Pagan, William A Bulman
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):7-7
      Background: Next-generation sequencing (NGS) with a multi-gene panel is now available for patients with lung adenocarcinoma, but the performance characteristics and clinical utility of this testing are not well-described. We present the results of an extended 467 gene panel in a series of advanced, highly selected nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients using a range of specimens, including predominantly small biopsy and cytology specimens. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 22 NSCLC biopsies sent for NGS using an extended gene panel from January 2014 to July 2015. The customized NGS panel sequences 467 cancer-associated genes with exonic and intronic sequences obtained from purified tumor DNA. Genomic alterations, patient characteristics, and success of testing were determined. Results: The majority of samples tested were metastatic lung adenocarcinoma on final pathology. Of the 22 specimens tested, 5 (22.7%) were surgical resections and 17 (77.3%) were small biopsy and cytology specimens. Twenty-one (95%) of the specimens were adequate for full sequencing and yielded a total of 204 genomic alterations (average 8.9 per tumor), of which 17 (average 0.81 per tumor) were actionable and/or clinically relevant. Genomic alterations were found most commonly in the TP53, EGFR, EPHB1, MLL3, APC, SETD2, KRAS, DNMT3A, RB1, CDKN2A, ARID1A, EP300, KDM6B, RAD50, STK11, and BRCA2 genes. Conclusions: NGS using a comprehensive gene panel was performed successfully in 95% of all NSCLC cases in this series, including 94% small biopsy and cytology specimens and 100% surgical resections. This custom assay was performed on a range of tumor specimens and demonstrates that small specimens are able to provide a similar depth of information as larger ones. As many patients present at an advanced stage and only small specimens are obtained, the information these provide has the potential for guiding treatment in highly selected patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma.
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):7-7
      PubDate: Mon,20 Mar 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.202602
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of hyperenhancing lesion
           suspicious for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in the tail of
           pancreas-potential pitfalls

    • Authors: Kinda Hayek, Tatyana Kalinicheva, Vinod B Shidham
      Pages: 8 - 8
      Abstract: Kinda Hayek, Tatyana Kalinicheva, Vinod B Shidham
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):8-8

      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):8-8
      PubDate: Fri,28 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.205311
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Indian visceral leishmaniasis with extensive lymphadenopathy – An
           unusual presentation: A case report with literature review

    • Authors: Poojan Agarwal, Vijay Kumar, Manju Kaushal, Manju Kumari, Arvind Chaudhary
      Pages: 9 - 9
      Abstract: Poojan Agarwal, Vijay Kumar, Manju Kaushal, Manju Kumari, Arvind Chaudhary
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):9-9
      Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), also known as kala-azar, is a life-threatening systemic disease caused by the obligate intracellular protozoan, Leishmania, and transmitted to humans by the female phlebotomine sand fly (Phlebotomus argentipes). The disease is fatal, if left untreated. We report a case of a patient clinically suspected of disseminated tuberculosis, but fine needle aspiration cytology of cervical and axillary lymph nodes yielded a diagnosis of leishmaniasis. Diagnosis of VL was challenging as the disease closely mimicked tuberculosis in the setting of extensive lymphadenopathy including conglomerate of mesenteric lymph nodes, on and off fever, and granulomatous lymphadenitis on aspiration. Bone marrow examination was further performed. A detailed workup revealed patient to be severely immunocompromised and newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive. Worldwide, India has the largest number of VL cases, accounting for 40%–50% of world's disease burden and the second largest HIV-infected population, accounting for approximately 10% of the global disease burden. HIV increases the risk of developing VL by 100–2320 times in endemic areas and concurrently VL promotes the clinical progression of HIV disease. Co-infection with HIV alters the body's immune response to leishmaniasis thus leading to unusual presentations. This case highlights the diagnostic problem in the aforesaid setting. Moreover, co-infection with HIV in VL can be a potential source of drug resistance. An early diagnosis and intensified treatment is the key to patient management.
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):9-9
      PubDate: Fri,28 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.205312
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Cytomorphologic features distinguishing Bethesda category IV thyroid
           lesions from parathyroid

    • Authors: Simon Sung, Anjali Saqi, Elizabeth M Margolskee, John P Crapanzano
      Pages: 10 - 10
      Abstract: Simon Sung, Anjali Saqi, Elizabeth M Margolskee, John P Crapanzano
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):10-10
      Background: Thyroid follicular cells share similar cytomorphological features with parathyroid. Without a clinical suspicion, the distinction between a thyroid neoplasm and an intrathyroidal parathyroid can be challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the distinguishing cytomorphological features of parathyroid (including intrathyroidal) and Bethesda category IV (Beth-IV) thyroid follicular lesions, which carry a 15%–30% risk of malignancy and are often followed up with surgical resection. Methods: A search was performed to identify “parathyroid” diagnoses in parathyroid/thyroid-designated fine-needle aspirations (FNAs) and Beth-IV thyroid FNAs (follicular and Hurthle cell), all with diagnostic confirmation through surgical pathology, immunocytochemical stains, Afirma® analysis, and/or clinical correlation. Unique cytomorphologic features were scored (0-3) or noted as present versus absent. Statistical analysis was performed using R 3.3.1 software. Results: We identified five FNA cases with clinical suspicion of parathyroid neoplasm, hyperthyroidism, or thyroid lesion that had an eventual final diagnosis of the parathyroid lesion (all female; age 20–69 years) and 12 Beth-IV diagnoses (11 female, 1 male; age 13–64 years). The following cytomorphologic features are useful distinguishing features (P value): overall pattern (0.001), single cells (0.001), cell size compared to red blood cell (0.01), nuclear irregularity (0.001), presence of nucleoli (0.001), nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio (0.007), and nuclear chromatin quality (0.028). Conclusions: There are cytomorphologic features that distinguish Beth-IV thyroid lesions and (intrathyroidal) parathyroid. These features can aid in rendering correct diagnoses and appropriate management.
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):10-10
      PubDate: Fri,28 Apr 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.205313
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An elderly man with a solitary liver lesion

    • Authors: Lisa Barton, Lichao Zhao, Jessica N Doty, Thomas Stasko, Rachel Conrad
      Pages: 11 - 11
      Abstract: Lisa Barton, Lichao Zhao, Jessica N Doty, Thomas Stasko, Rachel Conrad
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):11-11

      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):11-11
      PubDate: Fri,26 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.207138
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Cytological features of adenocarcinoma admixed with small cell
           neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    • Authors: Naoshi Shimojo, Yoshifumi S Hirokawa, Kazuki Kanayama, Misao Yoneda, Ryotaro Hashizume, Akinobu Hayashi, Katsunori Uchida, Hiroshi Imai, Yuji Kozuka, Taizo Shiraishi
      Pages: 12 - 12
      Abstract: Naoshi Shimojo, Yoshifumi S Hirokawa, Kazuki Kanayama, Misao Yoneda, Ryotaro Hashizume, Akinobu Hayashi, Katsunori Uchida, Hiroshi Imai, Yuji Kozuka, Taizo Shiraishi
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):12-12
      Adenocarcinoma admixed with neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare malignancy with a poor prognosis, and few reports have described the cytological features of this carcinoma. To characterize the cytological features of this malignancy in cervical smears, we report a case of a 52-year-old Japanese woman with cervical adenocarcinoma admixed with small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNEC). Cytologically, there were two types of cells with different sizes. The smaller cells formed clusters, which showed a partially Indian file pattern, a high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio, and hyperchromatic nuclei. In contrast, the larger cells showed cytological features of adenocarcinoma, indicating a glandular-like pattern. Histological examination of biopsy specimens revealed that the tumors were composed of almost equal areas of SCNEC and adenocarcinoma. Neuroendocrine differentiation was confirmed by immunohistochemistry for synaptophysin and CD56. Thus, when adenocarcinoma cells are detected in smears, attempts to search for SCNEC cells should be made by combined cytological and histological analyses in order to reach an accurate diagnosis of the carcinoma in the uterine cervix.
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):12-12
      PubDate: Fri,26 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.207139
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • “Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, cannot exclude
           high-grade:” TBS says “Don't Use It!” should I
           really stop it?

    • Authors: Jeanine M Chiaffarano, Melissa Alexander, Robert Rogers, Fang Zhou, Joan Cangiarella, Melissa Yee-Chang, Paul Elgert, Aylin Simsir
      Pages: 13 - 13
      Abstract: Jeanine M Chiaffarano, Melissa Alexander, Robert Rogers, Fang Zhou, Joan Cangiarella, Melissa Yee-Chang, Paul Elgert, Aylin Simsir
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):13-13
      Background: The Bethesda System uses a two-tiered approach in the diagnosis of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs). Occasionally, Papanicolaou (Pap) tests with evident low-grade SIL (LSIL) also have some features suggestive but not diagnostic of high-grade SIL (HSIL). This study reviews our experience with “Low-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion, Cannot Exclude High-grade” (LSIL-H) and discusses the best approach to report such Paps if the LSIL-H interpretation is abandoned. Methods: Abnormal Paps were identified between January and December 2014 that had surgical follow-up within 6 months. Their biopsy outcomes were compared. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's Chi-square and McNemar tests in SPSS software version 23. Statistical significance was defined as P ≤ 0.05. Results: There were a total of 1049 abnormal Paps with follow-up. High-grade dysplasia/carcinoma (HGD+) was found in 8% of LSIL, 30% of LSIL-H, 52% of atypical squamous cells (ASCs), cannot rule out HSIL (ASC-H), and 77% of HSIL Paps. The detection rate of HGD+ for LSIL-H was between that of LSIL (Pearson's Chi-square test, P = 0.000) and ASC-H (P = 0.04). If LSIL-H cases are reported as ASC-H, the rate of HGD+ for the ASC-H category would decrease from 51.5% to 37.4% (McNemar test, P = 0.000). Alternatively, if LSIL-H cases are downgraded to LSIL, the rate of HGD+ for the LSIL category would rise from 7.7% to 10.4% (McNemar test, P = 0.000). Nearly 86.7% of LSIL-H cases were positive for high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) in comparison to 77.5% of LSILs, 100% of ASC-Hs, and 75% of HSILs. The sample size for HR-HPV and LSIL-H was too small for meaningful statistical analysis. Conclusions: “LSIL-H” category detects more HGD+ than LSIL, and fewer than ASC-H and HSIL. If LSIL-H is eliminated, Paps with this finding are best reported as ASC-H to ensure that women with potential HGD+ undergo colposcopy in a timely manner. Reporting LSIL-H as LSIL may delay colposcopy since management of LSIL Paps depends on multiple factors (age, HPV status, etc.).
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):13-13
      PubDate: Fri,26 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/cytojournal.cytojournal_48_16
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Myoepithelioma of soft tissue in the gluteal region: Diagnostic pitfall in
           cytology

    • Authors: Viral M Bhanvadia, Neeru M Agarwal, Alpesh D Chavda, Bharat V Bhetariya
      Pages: 14 - 14
      Abstract: Viral M Bhanvadia, Neeru M Agarwal, Alpesh D Chavda, Bharat V Bhetariya
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):14-14

      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):14-14
      PubDate: Tue,20 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/cytojournal.cytojournal_45_16
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Metastatic prostatic stromal sarcoma: A challenging diagnosis on
           fine-needle aspiration with broad differential diagnosis

    • Authors: Muhammad Siddique Khurram, Ghassan Tranesh, Ramen Sakhi, Ameer Hamza, Warda Ibrar, Roohi Bano
      Pages: 15 - 15
      Abstract: Muhammad Siddique Khurram, Ghassan Tranesh, Ramen Sakhi, Ameer Hamza, Warda Ibrar, Roohi Bano
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):15-15
      Prostatic stromal sarcomas (PSS) are rare solid organ mesenchymal sarcomas. PSS may pose difficult diagnostic challenges on fine needle aspiration biopsy. We report a 48-year-old man diagnosed with metastatic high grade prostatic stromal sarcoma by a CT-scan guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of a right lower lung lobe nodule. We reviewed the literature on the epidemiologic, cyto-histological, and immunophenotypic findings and discussed the differential diagnosis for this rare entity.
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):15-15
      PubDate: Tue,20 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/cytojournal.cytojournal_46_16
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Metastatic neoplasms to the thyroid diagnosed by fine-needle
           aspiration/core needle biopsy: Clinicopathologic and cytomorphologic
           correlation

    • Authors: Mobeen Rahman, Ashley Rae Okada, Kevin Guan, Pamela Tauchi-Nishi
      Pages: 16 - 16
      Abstract: Mobeen Rahman, Ashley Rae Okada, Kevin Guan, Pamela Tauchi-Nishi
      CytoJournal 2017 14(1):16-16
      Background: Although thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy (CNB) are commonly utilized modalities in the evaluation of thyroid nodules, metastatic tumors to the thyroid are only rarely encountered. We aspired to determine the incidence and primary origin of metastases to the thyroid at our institution and to examine their clinicopathologic and cytomorphologic features. Materials and Methods: A search of our database was undertaken to review all thyroid FNA and/or CNB examined between January 2004 and December 2013. Results: During our 10 year study period, 7497 patients underwent 13,182 FNA and/or CNB. Four hundred sixty one (6%) patients were diagnosed with neoplasms. Only five (1.1%) were found to have metastatic tumors to the thyroid involving three females and two males. Two were diagnosed by FNA, one by CNB, and two by both FNA and CNB, with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) employed in all cases. The primary malignancies in the five cases were pulmonary and nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and olfactory neuroblastoma. The cytomorphologic features of these metastases to the thyroid aided in their distinction from primary thyroid carcinoma. Two of these metastases, a renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic adenocarcinoma, were the first clinical manifestations of cancer. Conclusion: Metastases to the thyroid diagnosed by FNA and/or CNB are exceedingly rare in our institution, comprising only 0.04% of total FNA/CNB and only 1.1% of all thyroid neoplasms. We report the first known case of metastatic olfactory neuroblastoma to the thyroid diagnosed by aspiration cytology. In addition, an occult primary may present as a thyroid mass on FNA or CNB as occurred with two of our cases. FNA/CNB proved to be highly effective in the diagnosis of metastases to the thyroid, with ROSE proving valuable in assuring specimen adequacy. Thyroid FNA and CNB demonstrated great utility in the setting of metastatic disease, obviating the need for more invasive procedures.
      Citation: CytoJournal 2017 14(1):16-16
      PubDate: Tue,20 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/cytojournal.cytojournal_50_16
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2017)
       
 
 
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