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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 354 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics
  [SJR: 0.359]   [H-I: 21]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0973-1482
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [354 journals]
  • Expert consensus workshop report: Guideline for three-dimensional-printing
           template-assisted computed tomography-guided 125I seeds interstitial
           implantation brachytherapy

    • Authors: Shiro Saito, Xin Ye
      Pages: 605 - 606
      Abstract: Shiro Saito, Xin Ye
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):605-606

      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):605-606
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_540_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Expert consensus workshop report: Guideline for three-dimensional printing
           template-assisted computed tomography-guided 125I seeds interstitial
           implantation brachytherapy

    • Authors: Junjie Wang, Fujun Zhang, Jinhe Guo, Shude Chai, Guangjun Zheng, Kaixian Zhang, Anyan Liao, Ping Jiang, Yuliang Jiang, Zhe Ji
      Pages: 607 - 612
      Abstract: Junjie Wang, Fujun Zhang, Jinhe Guo, Shude Chai, Guangjun Zheng, Kaixian Zhang, Anyan Liao, Ping Jiang, Yuliang Jiang, Zhe Ji
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):607-612
      Radioactive 125I seeds (RIS) interstitial implantation brachytherapy has been a first-line treatment for early-stage cancer of the prostate gland. However, its poor accuracy and homogeneity has limited its indication and hampered its popularization for a long time. Intriguingly, scholars based in China introduced computed tomography (CT)-guided technology to improve the accuracy and homogeneity of RIS implantation and broadened the indications. Then, they creatively designed and introduced three-dimensional printing coplanar template (3D-PCT) and 3D printing noncoplanar template (3D-PNCT) into the practice of RIS implantation. Use of such templates makes RIS implantation more precise and efficacious and aids preoperative planning, real-time dose optimization, and postoperative planning. However, studies on the standard workflow for 3D-PT-assisted CT-guided RIS implantation have not been published. Therefore, the China Northern Radioactive Seeds Brachytherapy Group organized multidisciplinary experts to formulate the guideline for this emerging treatment modality. This guideline aims at standardizing 3D-PT-assisted CT-guided RIS implantation procedures and criteria for selecting treatment candidates and assessing outcomes and for preventing and managing postoperative complications.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):607-612
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_412_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • The clinical application of HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing in triaging women with
           atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or low-grade squamous
           intra-epithelial lesion Pap smear: A meta-analysis

    • Authors: Li Yang, Yuanhang Zhu, Yang Bai, Xiaoan Zhang, Chenchen Ren
      Pages: 613 - 620
      Abstract: Li Yang, Yuanhang Zhu, Yang Bai, Xiaoan Zhang, Chenchen Ren
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):613-620
      Objective: The aim is to evaluate the clinical application value and correlation with cervical lesions' progression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 mRNA test in women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS/borderline) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs/mild dyskaryosis) cytological abnormalities.Methods: A meta-analysis was conduct by searching China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1979–2016), Wanfang Date (1998–2016), VIP (1989–2016), PubMed (1950–2016), Web of Science (1950–2016) and Elsevier Science Direct (1998–2016), for studies on effect of HPV E6/E7 mRNA detection in women with ASCUS/LSIL/dyskaryosis. Study selection and appraisal were conducted independently by three authors, according to inclusive and exclusive criteria. Then, a meta-analysis was performed using the RevMan4.2 software. The subgroups analysis was conducted according to women's initial HPV DNA test results.Results: Six articles with a total of 1024 subjects were included in the study. It was concluded that a positive HPV E6/E7 mRNA tested result have a higher risk of progressing to CIN2+ in future 2 years than a negative result. The pooled relative risk (RR) is 3.08, (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.57–6.07, P < 0.05). The same situation was also observed in the subgroup of HPV DNA tested positive group and HPV DNA tested unlimited group. The pooled RR value of the two subgroups was, respectively, 1.98, (95% CI = 1.19–1.19, P < 0.05) and 7.58, (95% CI = 3.64–3.64, P < 0.05).Conclusion: A positive HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing result suggested the women with ASCUS, or LSIL Pap smear was in a truly dangerous position, which is an adverse prognostic factor. It suggested that cervical lesions stay in a progressing status and these women should be referred for colposcopy and strengthen follow-up promptly. Whereas, women with a negative HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing result can increase follow-up interval, by comprehensively considering their situation, thus, avoiding unnecessary colposcopy and reducing the rate of colposcopy and biopsy.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):613-620
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_56_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Role of collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 in tumor and
           inflammatory diseases

    • Authors: Qian Wu, Qingrui Yang, Hongsheng Sun
      Pages: 621 - 624
      Abstract: Qian Wu, Qingrui Yang, Hongsheng Sun
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):621-624
      Initially, collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (CTHRC1) is expressed mainly in adventitial fibroblasts and neointimal smooth muscle cells of balloon-injured vessels, and increases cell migration, promotes tissue repair in response to injury. A variety of studies demonstrated that over-expression of CTHRC1 in solid tumors results in enhancement of migration and invasion of tumor cells, and is associated with decreased overall survival and disease-free survival. CTHRC1 expression is elevated in hepatitis B virus-infected patients and highly correlated with hepatocellular carcinoma progression as well. Furthermore, CTHRC1 plays a pivotal role in a great many fields, including increases bone mass, prevents myelination, reverses collagen synthesis in keloid fibroblasts, and increases fibroblast-like synoviocytes migration speed and abundant production of arthritic pannus in rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, it will provide new insight into the pathogenesis of tumor and autoimmune diseases, and will shed new light on the therapy of related clinical diseases.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):621-624
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_410_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Efficacy comparison of radiofrequency ablation and hepatic resection for
           hepatocellular carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    • Authors: E Changyong, Dan Wang, Yang Yu, Hongyu Liu, Hui Ren, Tao Jiang
      Pages: 625 - 630
      Abstract: E Changyong, Dan Wang, Yang Yu, Hongyu Liu, Hui Ren, Tao Jiang
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):625-630
      Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the therapeutic efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and hepatic resection (HR) for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and Methods: A literature search was performed for comparative studies reporting outcomes of both RFA and HR for HCC. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated.Results: A total of 4812 patients with HCC were included, with 2419 in the RFA group and 2393 in the HR group. The 3- and 5-year overall survival rates in the HR group were significantly higher than those in the RFA group (OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.58–0.79, P < 0.00001; OR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.50–0.65, P < 0.00001, respectively). 1-, 3-, 5-year disease-free survival and correspond recurrence-free survival rates were all better in HR group.Conclusion: RFA gets promising clinical outcomes for HCC treatments but is not yet comparable to surgery. HR is still the first-line treatment for HCC.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):625-630
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_406_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Transarterial embolization with N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate for the treatment
           of arterioportal shunts in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    • Authors: Feng Duan, Yanhua Bai, Li Cui, Xiaohui Li, Jieyu Yan, Haiyan Zhu
      Pages: 631 - 635
      Abstract: Feng Duan, Yanhua Bai, Li Cui, Xiaohui Li, Jieyu Yan, Haiyan Zhu
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):631-635
      Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate efficacy and safety of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with arterioportal shunts (APS).Subjects and Methods: From January 2008 to June 2014, 36 cases of HCC with APS were treated by TACE with NBCA. NBCA-lipiodol mixture was superselective delivered before routine TACE in HCC patients with APS. Recanalization of shunt, objective response, clinical adverse events, and survival rates was retrospectively studied.Results: All interventional procedures were successful without any procedure relevant complications. The immediate APS improvement rate was 83.3% (30/36), and the APS improvement rate at first-time follow-up was 66.6% (20/30). Radiologically confirmed complete response (CR), partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease at 1 month after first chemoembolization were observed in 1 (2.7%), 19 (52.8%), 6 (16.7%), and 10 (27.8%) patients, respectively. Survival rates were 91.7% at 6 months, 47.2% at 1 year, and 13.9% at 2 years. The median survival time was 11 months. No severe adverse effects were noted.Conclusions: The preliminary experience indicates TACE with NBCA can be safely performed and may improve prognosis of HCC with arterioportal shunt.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):631-635
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_286_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Bronchial artery chemoembolization combined with radioactive iodine-125
           seed implantation in the treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    • Authors: Yaoyong Chen, Yuwei Li, Yuming Jia, Kaijian Lei, Xinfeng Zhang, Yueyong Cao, Jun Zhu
      Pages: 636 - 641
      Abstract: Yaoyong Chen, Yuwei Li, Yuming Jia, Kaijian Lei, Xinfeng Zhang, Yueyong Cao, Jun Zhu
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):636-641
      Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term efficacy and safety of bronchial artery chemoembolization (BACE) combined with radioactive iodine-125 seed implantation in the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).Materials and Methods: Sixty-two Stage III–IV NSCLC patients were divided into Groups A and B. Thirty cases were treated with BACE combined with radioactive iodine-125 seed implantation in the Group A and 32 cases were treated with BACE alone in the Group B until disease progression. Efficacy, incidence rate of adverse drug reactions, and survival rate were compared between the two groups.Results: The local control rates and effective rates of Groups A and B were 90% and 59.3% and 74% and 40.6%, respectively, with P < 0.05 for each. The progression-free survival of the study group and the control group was 12.6 and 8.2 months, respectively; the median survival time of the Groups A and B was 644 and 544 days, and the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.034).Conclusion: BACE combined with radioactive iodine-125 seed implantation was safe and effective in the treatment of advanced NSCLC, with an efficacy superior to that of single BACE.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):636-641
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_93_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • A retrospective analysis of the efficacy of microparticle-mediated
           chemoembolization in liver metastases arising from gastrointestinal tumors
           

    • Authors: Chuang Li, Ying Liu, Jun Zhou, Yue-Wei Zhang
      Pages: 642 - 646
      Abstract: Chuang Li, Ying Liu, Jun Zhou, Yue-Wei Zhang
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):642-646
      Purpose: We evaluated the clinical efficacy of gelatin sponge microparticle (GSM) -mediated chemoembolization for the treatment of patients with liver metastases following surgery for gastrointestinal tumors.Materials and Methods: In a retrospective analysis of 37 patients who were treated at our hospital with GSM-mediated chemoembolization for liver metastases over 13 years, we evaluated outcomes using a modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors system and also assessed liver function and adverse effects. All patients had previously undergone surgery for gastrointestinal tumors.Results: Treatment produced various degrees of necrosis and shrinkage of lesions among our patients. Two patients achieved a complete response (CR), 27 showed a partial response (PR), five had stable disease, and three had progressive disease. The overall response rate (CR + PR) was 78%, and no severe adverse effects were observed.Conclusion: GSM-mediated chemoembolization showed good clinical efficacy in the treatment of liver metastases after gastrointestinal tumor surgery. However, larger cohort and clinical controlled studies are warranted.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):642-646
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_213_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis for detecting upper
           urinary tract-urothelial carcinoma

    • Authors: Jiang Yu, Hui Xiong, Chunxiao Wei, Zilian Cui, Xunbo Jin, Jianjun Zhang
      Pages: 647 - 650
      Abstract: Jiang Yu, Hui Xiong, Chunxiao Wei, Zilian Cui, Xunbo Jin, Jianjun Zhang
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):647-650
      Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the detection of upper urinary tract-urothelial carcinoma (UUT-UC).Methods: Between November 2011 and November 2015, voided urine specimens from 52 consecutive patients with UUT-UC and 26 controls were collected for both FISH test and cytology. Sensitivity and specificity of FISH test and cytology were determined and compared. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations was also analyzed.Results: For FISH analysis, the sensitivity was 79.5% and specificity was 96.3%. For cytology, the sensitivity was 27.3% and specificity was 100%. The overall sensitivity for FISH was significantly higher than that of in single value-based urine cytology (79.5% vs. 27.3%, respectively, P < 0.001). The sensitivities of FISH and cytology by grade were 64.3% vs. 28.6% for low-grade urothelial carcinomas (P = 0.128) and 86.7% vs. 26.7% for high-grade urothelial carcinomas (P < 0.001), respectively. Twenty-seven (77.1%) cases were positive due to the gain of two or more chromosomes in five or more urinary cells, among which, 21 (60%) cases showed positivity in all the 4 chromosomes, 7 (20%) cases matched the criterion that 10 or more cells gained a single chromosome, whereas only 1 (2.9%) case was positive because of the homozygous deletion of 9p21 in 12 or more cells.Conclusions: FISH has superior sensitivity and similar specificity in the detection of UUT-UC, compared with cytology. The present findings indicated that FISH can be applied as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for suspected UUT-UC patients.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):647-650
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_74_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Kinesin superfamily protein expression and its association with
           progression and prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    • Authors: Jianliang Chen, Shu Li, Shu Zhou, Shouji Cao, Yun Lou, Haiyuan Shen, Jie Yin, Guoqiang Li
      Pages: 651 - 659
      Abstract: Jianliang Chen, Shu Li, Shu Zhou, Shouji Cao, Yun Lou, Haiyuan Shen, Jie Yin, Guoqiang Li
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):651-659
      Objectives: In this study, we characterized the expression of 32 other kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) and analyzed their association with the progression and prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and Methods: The data from 295 HCC patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas were included in the study. An independent t-test was used to compare the KIF levels in HCC and adjacent tissues. Pearson's Chi-square test was used to assess the relationships of KIF expression with tumor biomarkers and clinicopathological parameters. Kaplan–Meier plots and log-rank tests were used to analyze survival, and univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify independent prognostic factors.Results: The expressions of 32 KIFs were compared between HCC and adjacent nontumor tissues. Among them, 12 KIFs showed no statistical significance, 17 KIFs were upregulated, and three KIFs were downregulated in tumor tissues. The levels of some KIFs were markedly correlated with that of biomarkers for the S phase and proliferation. KIF2A and KIFC3 expression was positively associated with biomarkers for cell invasion and migration. Some KIF overexpression was significantly associated with neoplastic pathological grade and tumor-node-metastasis staging. Furthermore, KIF2C, KIF4A, and KIF11 overexpression were significantly associated with shorter relapse-free survival times. KIF2A, KIF2C, KIF3A, KIF4B, KIF11, KIF15, KIFC1, and KIFC3 overexpression was associated with shorter overall survival (OS) times, whereas higher expression of KIF19 was associated with a longer OS time. Further multivariate analyses suggested that only KIF4B was an independent prognostic factor for HCC.Conclusions: Most overexpressions of abnormal KIFs were significantly associated with HCC progression and prognosis, indicating that KIFs could be prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers for HCC. However, it is necessary to further study the function of KIFs and their mechanisms involved in HCC.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):651-659
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_491_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Treatment outcomes of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the maxillary
           sinus

    • Authors: Hui Huang, Dezhi Li, Xiaolei Wang, Yuehuang Wu, Shaoyan Liu, Zhengang Xu
      Pages: 660 - 663
      Abstract: Hui Huang, Dezhi Li, Xiaolei Wang, Yuehuang Wu, Shaoyan Liu, Zhengang Xu
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):660-663
      Background: Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is an uncommon neoplasm of maxillary sinus. This study was designed to investigate the clinical courses and summarize the experience of the treatment outcomes.Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis which included patients with MFH of the maxillary sinus from January 1980 to December 2008 treated in our institute. Survival data were analyzed by means of the Kaplan–Meier method using univariate analysis and Cox regression model using multivariate analysis.Results: The study included 31 patients. Of which, one patient received radical radiotherapy, and thirty patients received surgical resection. Of these, thirty patients received preoperative radiotherapy, and 11 patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Radical resection with clear surgical margins was obtained in twelve patients (80%) after preoperative radiotherapy, and in eight patients (53.3%) with postoperative radiotherapy (P = 0.221). The 3-year overall survival rate (OS) and recurrence-free survival rate (RFS) were 59.0% and 43.5%, respectively. Patients treated with a radical resection had significantly better survival than patients with a nonradical resection. Three-year OS was 79.8% and 28.1%, 3-year RFS was 61.9% and 18.5%, respectively (P = 0.001 and 0.029, respectively). Local recurrence rate (LRR) was lower in patients resected with clear surgical margins than patients with unclear or uncertain margins, and the 3 years LRR was 33.3% and 72.2%, respectively (P = 0.052).Conclusions: Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for MFH of the maxillary sinus. A radical resection with clear margins is essential for excellent local control and long-term survival.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):660-663
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_29_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Overexpression of KIAA1199: An independent prognostic marker in nonsmall
           cell lung cancer

    • Authors: Fei Deng, Jie Lei, Xueqin Zhang, Weiwei Huang, Yongjun Li, Dehua Wu
      Pages: 664 - 668
      Abstract: Fei Deng, Jie Lei, Xueqin Zhang, Weiwei Huang, Yongjun Li, Dehua Wu
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):664-668
      Objective: KIAA1199 has been identified as an oncogene in many cancers. Here, we collected 153 cases of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues to investigate the relationships between KIAA1199 protein and clinical factors.Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was used to detect the expression of KIAA1199. Follow-up included blood analysis, chest X-ray, ultrasound examination, and computed tomography was carried out every 3 months for the first 2 years and at 6-month intervals thereafter during the follow-up period (3 years). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox analysis were applied to identify the relationship between KIAA1199 and NSCLC.Results: IHC results showed that 76 (49.67%) specimens had strong expression of KIAA1199 protein, with poor differentiation (P = 0.003), higher positive lymph node metastasis (P = 0.037), and higher tumor node metastasis stage (P = 0.016). Using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis, it is found that patients with high KIAA1199 protein expression have poor overall survival (P = 0.004). Cox analysis suggested that the KIAA1199 protein was an independent prognostic marker for NSCLC patients (P = 0.040).Conclusion: Our findings revealed that KIAA1199 protein could be applied in predicting NSCLC patient's outcome.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):664-668
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_61_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after radiofrequency ablation for
           malignant lung tumors

    • Authors: Jin Chen, Zheng-Yu Lin, Zhi-Bin Wu, Zhong-Wu Chen, Yi-Ping Chen
      Pages: 669 - 675
      Abstract: Jin Chen, Zheng-Yu Lin, Zhi-Bin Wu, Zhong-Wu Chen, Yi-Ping Chen
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):669-675
      Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of the therapeutic response in small lung malignancies (<3 cm) immediately after radiofrequency ablation (RFA).Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of MRI performance in 24 cases of small lung tumors (16 primary, 8 metastatic; 20 patients) immediately, post-RFA, and at follow-up. Variables measured included maximum diameters of tumors on pre-RFA MRI, central areas of low signal intensity (SI) on post-RFA T2-weighted images (T2WIs), and central areas of high SI on post-RFA T1WIs. Additional post-RFA measurements included the maximum diameters for areas of ground-glass opacities (GGOs) on computed tomography (CT), high SI on T2WIs, and isointense SI on T1WIs. Mean values were used for statistical analysis.Results: Before RFA, 16 primary and seven metastatic lung tumors showed isointense signals on T1WIs and hyperintense signals on T2WIs. Immediately after RFA, the ablated lesions showed central low signals and peripheral high annular signals on T2WIs and central high signals and peripheral annular isointense signals on T1WIs, with reduced SI on diffusion-weighted images. Significant differences were found between the preoperative MRI maximum tumor diameter and post-RFA diameters of central low SI areas on T2WIs and central high SI areas on T1WIs. Furthermore, there were significant differences between the post-RFA maximum diameter of circumferential high signals on T2WIs and the post-RFA maximum diameters of both GGOs on CT and circumferential isointense signals on T1WIs. There were three cases of local recurrence (two pulmonary metastases and one primary) during follow-up.Conclusions: MRI evaluation of the therapeutic response of RFA for small malignant lung tumors (<3 cm) was precise and reliable.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):669-675
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_448_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • MicroRNA-30c inhibits metastasis of ovarian cancer by targeting
           metastasis-associated gene 1

    • Authors: Xia Wang, Li-Wei Qiu, Chen Peng, Shu-Ping Zhong, Lin Ye, Di Wang
      Pages: 676 - 682
      Abstract: Xia Wang, Li-Wei Qiu, Chen Peng, Shu-Ping Zhong, Lin Ye, Di Wang
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):676-682
      Background: It is important to find reliable molecular markers or biological targets that associate with ovarian cancer (OC) metastasis for diagnosis and treatment. In this study, researchers investigated the regulated chain of microRNA-30c (miR-30c) and metastasis-associated gene 1 (MTA1) in OC tissues and cells.Materials and Methods: Expression of miR-30c and MTA1 was detected with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in 33 OC and matched adjacent tissues. MiR-30c mimics were synthetized and transfected into SKOV3 cells to target MTA1. The wound healing and transwell assays were detected to observe migration and invasion of transfected OC cells.Results: Compared with matching normal ovarian tissues, the MTA1 expression was upregulated and localized in the cytoplasm, and the expression of miR-30c was significantly reduced. The expression intensity of MTA1 was correlated with the Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, tumor grade, and metastasis of OC. Transfecting miR-30c mimics could significantly reduce the expression of MTA1 in SKOV3 cells and obviously inhibit the migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells.Conclusion: MiR-30c and MTA1 abnormally expressed in OC, which may be related to metastasis of OC. In MiR-30c as a tumor suppressor gene, its expression in OC could lead to reduced expression of MTA1, which may be one of the mechanisms of metastasis of OC cells.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):676-682
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_132_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Repeated percutaneous microwave ablation for local recurrence of
           inoperable Stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer

    • Authors: Xia Yang, Xin Ye, Guanghui Huang, Xiaoying Han, Jiao Wang, Wenhong Li, Zhigang Wei, Min Meng
      Pages: 683 - 688
      Abstract: Xia Yang, Xin Ye, Guanghui Huang, Xiaoying Han, Jiao Wang, Wenhong Li, Zhigang Wei, Min Meng
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):683-688
      Background: The safety and effectiveness of repeated computed tomography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) in the management of local recurrence (LR) in patients with medically inoperable Stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were retrospectively evaluated.Materials and Methods: From February 2008 to August 2014, 104 patients with medically inoperable Stage I NSCLC received MWA. Patients with LR were given repeat MWA. The clinical outcomes and complications of repeat MWA for LR were evaluated.Results: At a median follow-up of 47 months, LR occurred in 24/104 (23.1%) patients within 12 ± 8 months after MWA. LR rates were higher in tumors >3.5 cm than that of tumors ≤3.5 cm (35.7% vs. 18.4%). Local control of the repeat MWA was achieved in 21 of 24 (87.5%) patients. Overall survival (OS) and progress-free survival (PFS) for patients without LR were similar to that of with LR and receiving repeat MWA (OS: 48 m vs. 41.5 m; PFS: 42 m vs. 32 m). The OS rates were 100%, 74.6%, 60.6%, and 27% for patients without LR at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years, and they were 96.4%, 69.5%, 60.6%, and 26.1% for patients with repeat MWA for LR. Repeat MWA for LR was not associated with more significant complications.Conclusion: The LR was higher in tumors >3.5 cm than that of in tumors ≤3.5 cm. For patients with LR, it was feasible and effective to use MWA repeatedly to achieve the similar OS and PFS as patients without LR. No additional complications were reported in the repeat MWA compared to the original MWA.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):683-688
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_458_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Serum expression level of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, highly
           sensitive C-reactive protein, and CA-125 as potential biomarkers for
           recurrence of cervical cancer

    • Authors: Suyang Guo, Bo Yang, Hongli Liu, Yuzhi Li, Shengze Li, Ling Ma, Jian Liu, Wei Guo
      Pages: 689 - 692
      Abstract: Suyang Guo, Bo Yang, Hongli Liu, Yuzhi Li, Shengze Li, Ling Ma, Jian Liu, Wei Guo
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):689-692
      Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum expression levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and CA-125 as potential serum biomarkers for recurrence of cervical cancer.Methods: Eighty-six cervical cancer patients who received radical treatment were retrospectively included in this study from February 2011 to January 2014. Of the included 86 cases, 23 were recurred within the 36 months (recurrence group [RG]) and other 63 patients did not (non-RG [NRG]). The serum levels of SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125 were examined and compared between the two groups. The prediction recurrence sensitivity, specificity area under the receiver operating characteristic curve were calculated by STATA11.0 software (http://www.stata.com). The correlation among SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125 were analyzed by Pearson correlation test.Results: The serum levels of SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125 were 1.29 (0.21–33.20) mg/mL, 4.78 (0.22–175.20) mg/mL, and 11.56 (2.028–123.66) IU/mL for NRG and 5.64 (0.50–136.80) mg/mL, 22.41 (0.56–588.90) mg/mL, and 25.41 (3.658–3687.00) IU/mL for RG, respectively. The serum levels of SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125 in NG group were significant higher than those of NRG group (P < 0.05). The recurrence prediction sensitivity was 0.74, 0.65, and 0.74; specificity was 0.65, 0.63, and 0.58; area under the curve was 0.75, 0.66, and 0.67, respectively, for serum SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125. Significant positive correlation between SCC-Ag and hs-CRP (rpearson = 0.20, P = 0.04), SCC-Ag and CA-125 (rpearson = 0.64, P < 0.001), hs-CRP and CA-125 (rpearson= –0.13, P = 0.56) was found in the RG patients.Conclusion: Serum SCC-Ag, hs-CRP, and CA-125 were higher in recurrence cervical patients which could be potential biomarkers for predicting cervical cancer recurrence risk.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):689-692
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_414_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of different width detector on the gross tumor volume
           delineation of the solitary pulmonary lesion

    • Authors: Dongping Shang, Jinbo Yue, Jianbin Li, Jinghao Duan, Yong Yin, Jinming Yu
      Pages: 693 - 698
      Abstract: Dongping Shang, Jinbo Yue, Jianbin Li, Jinghao Duan, Yong Yin, Jinming Yu
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):693-698
      Purpose: To explore the impact of different width detector on the volume and geometric position of gross tumor volume (GTV) of the solitary pulmonary lesion (SPL), as well as the impact on scanning time and radiation dose during the simulation.Materials and Methods: Twenty-three patients with SPL underwent three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) simulation using different width detector, followed by four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans. GTV16 and GTV4 derived from different width detectors were compared with internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) generated from 4DCT on the volume and geometric position. Fourteen patients with lesions located in the upper lobe were defined as Group A and nine patients in the middle or lower lobe were defined as Group B. The scanning time and radiation dose during the simulation with the different width detector were compared as well.Results: The volumes of IGTV, GTV16, and GTV4 in Group A were 13.86 ± 14.42 cm3, 11.88 ± 11.93 cm3, and 11.64 ± 12.88 cm3, respectively, and the corresponding volumes in Group B were 12.84 ± 11.48 cm3, 6.90 ± 6.63 cm3, and 7.22 ± 7.15 cm3, respectively. No difference was found between GTV16 and GTV4 in Groups A and B (PA = 0.11, PB = 0.86). Either GTV16 or GTV4 was smaller than IGTV (P16 = 0.001, P4 = 0.000). The comparison of the centroidal positions in x, y, and z directions for GTV16, GTV4, and IGTV showed no significant difference both in Groups A and B (Group A: Px = 0.19, Py = 0.14, Pz = 0.47. Group B: Px = 0.09, Py = 0.90, Pz = 0.90). The scanning time was shorter and radiation dose patient received was lower using 16 × 1.5 mm detector combination than 4 × 1.5 mm detector (P = 0.000).Conclusions: Different width detector had no impact on the volume and geometric position of GTV of SPL during 3DCT simulation. Using wide detector would save time and decrease radiation dose compared with the narrow one. 3DCT simulation using either 16 × 1.5 mm detector or 4 × 1.5 mm detector could not cover all tumor motion information that 4DCT offered under free breathing conditions.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):693-698
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_1448_16
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • k-RAS mutation and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine
           kinase inhibitor treatment in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer

    • Authors: Bin Zhou, Congrong Tang, Jie Li
      Pages: 699 - 701
      Abstract: Bin Zhou, Congrong Tang, Jie Li
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):699-701
      Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between k-RAS gene mutation and the resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) treatment in patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).Methods: Forty-five pathologies confirmed NSCLC patients who received EGFR-TKI (Gefitinib) treatment were retrospectively included in this study. The mutation of codon 12 and 13, located in exon1 and exon 2 of k-RAS gene were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DAN sequencing in tumor samples of the included 45 NSCLC patients. The correlation between Gefitinib treatment response and k-RAS mutation status was analyzed in tumor samples of the 45 NSCLC patients.Results: Eight tumor samples of the 45 NSCLC patients were found to be mutated in coden 12 or 13, with an mutation rate of 17.8% (8/45); the objective response rate (ORR) was 29.7%(11/37) with 1 cases of complete response (CR) and 10 cases of partial response in k-RAS mutation negative patients. Furthermore, the ORR was 0.0% in k-RAS mutation positive patients with none CR. The ORR between k-RAS mutation and nonmutation patients were significant different (P < 0.05).Conclusion: k-RAS gene mutation status was associated with the response of Gefitinib treatment in patients with NSCLC.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):699-701
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_468_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Surgical treatment is an effective approach for patients with synchronous
           multiple primary lung cancers

    • Authors: Yue Peng, Wangang Ren, Hui Wang, Meng Li, Zhen Feng, Zhongmin Peng
      Pages: 702 - 706
      Abstract: Yue Peng, Wangang Ren, Hui Wang, Meng Li, Zhen Feng, Zhongmin Peng
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):702-706
      Objective: The detection rate of synchronous multiple primary lung cancers (SMPLC) showed an increasing trend year by year. In an attempt to identify the optimal treatment strategy for SMPLC, we retrospectively analyzed our surgical treatment outcomes of a series of patients with SMPLC.Materials and Methods: A total of 43 SMPLC patients who met the modified Martini-Melamed criteria and with clinical data retained between November 2012 and July 2016 underwent complete resection without any preoperative induction therapy at the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shandong Provincial Hospital. The relationships between gender, age, family history of cancer, the number of tumors, the location of tumors, tumor size, tumor histology, regional lymph node metastasis, type of surgery, pathological stage, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation, mortality, and survival were further analyzed.Results: Among the 43 patients, 29 (67.4%) patients had ipsilateral tumors, whereas 14 (32.6%) patients had contralateral tumors. Nine patients with contralateral tumors underwent one-stage surgical treatment, with mean postoperative hospitalization days of 9.8. EGFR mutations were detected in 5 patients with synchronous multiple primary lung adenocarcinomas (SMPLA) for each lesion independently. The results showed different tumors in the same patient could carry different EGFR mutations. The 1- and 3-year overall survival (OS) rates were 97.0% and 76.7%, respectively. Larger maximal tumor dimension (P = 0.015), advanced pN stage (P = 0.002), advanced pT stage (P = 0.046), advanced TNM stage (P = 0.013), and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.025) were correlated with poor OS.Conclusions: SMPLC could be considered to be a local disease rather than the systemic disease. Surgical treatment is an effective approach for patients with SMPLC. Mutational status of EGFR could be used as a diagnostic criterion, especially in patients with SMPLA.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):702-706
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_140_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Expression and significance of Twist, estrogen receptor, and E-cadherin in
           human breast cancer cells and tissues

    • Authors: Ruizhi Tan, Li Wang, Jie Song, Jianchun Li, Tao He
      Pages: 707 - 714
      Abstract: Ruizhi Tan, Li Wang, Jie Song, Jianchun Li, Tao He
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):707-714
      Objectives: Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women, and the tumor cells' invasion and metastasis is the main cause of death. Recent reports showed that Twist, a transcription factor, plays multiple roles in breast cancer initiation, progress, and metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms of Twist in tumor invasion and metastasis of breast cancer still remain unclear. Here, we examined the correlation between Twist, E-cadherin, and estrogen receptor (ER) in promoting invasion and metastasis in breast cancer cells and tissues.Materials and Methods: The mRNA and protein expression of Twist, E-cadherin, and ER in breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-435, MDA-MB-231, and ZR-75-30) and human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tissues from 32 patients were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively.Results: Expression of Twist in cells with high ability of invasion and metastasis was higher than that in MCF-7 cell line which has low ability of invasion and metastasis, while the expression of ER and E-cadherin was much more higher in MCF-7 cell line than in other cells. IHC showed that the expression rate of Twist in IDC tissues and adjacent tissues was 84.38% and 31.25% and the positive expression of E-cadherin and ER was 21.88% and 40.63% in IDC tissues and 81.25% and 84.38% in adjacent tissues, respectively. Interestingly, overexpression of Twist promoted cellular invasion and metastasis and decreased the expression of E-cadherin, ER, AKT, and p-AKT in HEK-293 cells.Conclusions: Taken together, these findings demonstrated that Twist was upregulated in high invasion and metastasis cell lines as well as IDC tissues companioned with downregulated expression of E-cadherin and ER, which provides important clues for the deeper study of breast cancer.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):707-714
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_1396_16
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Thyroid carcinoma in children and adolescents: Clinical characteristics
           and follow-up from two centers

    • Authors: Jing-Jing Pan, Li Zhao, Rui Cheng, Yang Yang, Yu-Hua Hu
      Pages: 715 - 719
      Abstract: Jing-Jing Pan, Li Zhao, Rui Cheng, Yang Yang, Yu-Hua Hu
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):715-719
      Aim of Study: The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical features and outcomes of thyroid carcinoma (TC) in children and adolescent population treated in our institution.Materials and Methods: We gathered 43 TC patients 18 years of age or under initial diagnosed between 2009 and 2010 from two hospitals. Patient's clinical characteristics, laboratory tests, and outcomes were collected and analyzed.Results: (1) The incidence of TC is higher in women (2.4 vs. 1.6). Papillary carcinoma accounted for the major type (67.4%). There was significant difference in tumor number, extra thyroidal invasion, and distant metastasis when compared with the children group (P < 0.05). There were higher proportions of patients with lymph node metastasis (LNM) and radioiodine therapy in adolescent patients. (2) Thyroid peroxidase antibody, thyroglobulin, thyroglobulin antibody, and urine iodine had higher levels as compared to the normal reference range. Moreover, FT3 and urine iodine showed statistical significances in adolescent group (P < 0.05). (3) Papillary carcinoma and medullary TC are more likely to have LNM extrathyroidal invasion. (4) No significant differences were seen in recurrence rate or survival rate. Pulmonary metastasis was the most common way of cancer metastasis.Conclusion: The initial workup is crucial in determining benign from malignant lesions. Surgery is the most effective therapy even if it is associated with more complications in children. There is an extremely good prognosis for pediatric TC even distant metastasis happens.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):715-719
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_167_16
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Supplemental conventional transarterial embolization/chemoembolization
           therapy via extrahepatic arteries for hepatocellular carcinoma

    • Authors: Yuanqan Huang, Zhongzhi Jia, Jianfei Tu, Tao Shen, Feng Tian, Guomin Jiang
      Pages: 720 - 724
      Abstract: Yuanqan Huang, Zhongzhi Jia, Jianfei Tu, Tao Shen, Feng Tian, Guomin Jiang
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):720-724
      Purpose: To assess the value of conventional transarterial embolization/chemoembolization (cTAE/TACE) therapy via extrahepatic arteries for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Methods: Patients with unresectable HCC who underwent cTAE/TACE therapy via extrahepatic arteries between May 2008 and July 2016 across 4 medical centers were identified. The technical success, serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels changes, tumor response, disease control rate, survival rate, and major complication were analyzed.Results: A total of 185 patients (167 male and 18 female) were included in this study. A total of 401 procedures were performed of the 185 patients, with 2.2 ± 0.4 procedures for each patient. A total of 197 extrahepatic arteries were identified, including inferior phrenic artery (n = 80), omental artery (n = 39), gastric artery (n = 22), right renal capsular artery (n = 21), adrenal artery (n = 13), cystic artery (n = 11), and right internal mammary artery (n = 11). The technical success rate was 96.8% (179/185). The serum AFP levels were significantly reduced at 1 month after treatment in 71 patients whose AFP ≥400 ng/mL preprocedure (P < 0.01). The disease control rate was 93% (172/185) at 3 months after cTAE/TACE, with partial response, stable disease, or progressive disease of 115, 57, and 13 patients, respectively. The cumulative survival rate from the time of cTAE/TACE via extrahepatic arteries was 100% at 6 months. There were no embolization-related major complications.Conclusion: cTAE/TACE therapy via the extrahepatic arteries can reduce the incidence of presence of residual HCC, and improve the therapeutic efficacy of cTAE/TACE.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):720-724
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_993_16
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Effects of Macrothele raven venom on intrarenal invasion and metastasis of
           H22 liver cancer cells in mice

    • Authors: Yi Hou, Xiaokun Zhao, Jiaqin Chen, Jingsheng Zhou, Weiwei Chen, Haifeng Mao, Rui Chen
      Pages: 725 - 729
      Abstract: Yi Hou, Xiaokun Zhao, Jiaqin Chen, Jingsheng Zhou, Weiwei Chen, Haifeng Mao, Rui Chen
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):725-729
      Background: Extrahepatic metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its insensitivity to chemotherapy are the main causes of poor prognosis in patients with HCC. This study investigated the anti-cancer effect of Macrothele raveni venom on intrarenal metastatic HCC.Materials and Methods: Subrenal capsule xenograft model of HCC was established by inoculation of H22 liver cancer cells.Results: The general health, histology, and molecular changes were observed after administering 10 times of different dose of Macrothele raven venom injections. A volume of 0.8 μg/ml and 1.0 μg/ml of Macrothele raven venom significantly improved general health status in mice with subrenal capsule HCC tumors. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that Macrothele raven venom dose-dependently reduced invasion and metastasis of liver cancer cells in the kidney. Immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that Macrothele raven venom injection dose-dependently decreased PI3K mRNA and protein, Akt protein, and mTOR mRNA expression, but increased Bad mRNA and protein expression in the kidney with H22 tumor cell invasion. 0.8 μg/ml is the most effective dose for the treatment of intrarenal metastatic HCC.Conclusions: Macrothele raven venom dose-dependently inhibits invasion and metastasis of intrarenal metastatic HCC through inhibition of PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling and increase of Bad expression.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):725-729
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_1286_16
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 amplification detection by
           droplet digital polymerase chain reaction in formalin-fixed
           paraffin-embedded breast and gastric cancer samples

    • Authors: Xingwen Wang, Yunyan Wu, Xueling Song, Chengtao Sun, Changshun Wu, Hong Feng
      Pages: 730 - 734
      Abstract: Xingwen Wang, Yunyan Wu, Xueling Song, Chengtao Sun, Changshun Wu, Hong Feng
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):730-734
      Objective: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is an important biomarker for the precise individualized treatment including trastuzumab of HER2-positive breast and gastric cancer. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are the routine analyses for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. However, IHC is variable and depends on the evaluator, and FISH is a labor intensive and expensive method. We evaluated the feasibility of droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) as a precise and quantitative method for HER2 amplification test.Materials and Methods: We used ddPCR to confirm HER2 amplification status in 24 breast cancer and 29 gastric cancer samples to validate the HER2 cutoff value in ddPCR. After setting cutoff value, all the above-mentioned samples were tested by IHC. Afterward, another 51 equivocal IHC 2+ gastric cancer samples were further determined by FISH and ddPCR, respectively, and the concordance between ddPCR and FISH was calculated.Results: We set the HER2 cutoff value at 1.8. The concordance rate of HER2 status between ddPCR and IHC was 94.4% (17 out of 18) in 24 breast cancer samples. In 29 gastric cancer specimens, the concordance rate of HER2 amplification between ddPCR and IHC was 100% (22 out of 22). At last, compared with FISH determined HER2 status, ddPCR HER2 scores correctly classified 44 of 51 cases with 86.3% concordance in 51 equivocal IHC 2+ gastric cancer samples.Conclusions: ddPCR was able to identify HER2 amplification status in breast and gastric cancers with precise correlation with IHC and FISH results. This method might become a standard method for testing FFPE samples. However, the technology requires further research.
      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):730-734
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_587_17
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Linked color imaging technique assisted endoscopic diagnosis and
           interventions

    • Authors: Xiaotian Sun, Yan Liu, Min Min, Yiliang Bi, Yang Xu
      Pages: 735 - 735
      Abstract: Xiaotian Sun, Yan Liu, Min Min, Yiliang Bi, Yang Xu
      Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):735-735

      Citation: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2017 13(4):735-735
      PubDate: Wed,13 Sep 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_1458_16
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 4 (2017)
       
 
 
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