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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 429 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 429 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access  
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.127, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access  
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)

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Journal Cover
Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.311
Number of Followers: 12  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0970-0358
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [429 journals]
  • The golden fifty and the glorious forthcoming

    • Authors: Dinesh Kadam
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Dinesh Kadam
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):1-2

      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):1-2
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_74_18
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Professor Chakkiri Balakrishnan: The Guru of Gurus

    • Authors: Ramesh K Sharma
      Pages: 3 - 6
      Abstract: Ramesh K Sharma
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):3-6

      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):3-6
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_63_18
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A breast prosthesis infection update: Two-year incidence, risk factors and
           management at single institution

    • Authors: Ashley Nadia Boustany, Shady Elmaraghi, Nneamaka Agochukwu, Benjamin Cloyd, Adam J Dugan, Brian Rinker
      Pages: 7 - 14
      Abstract: Ashley Nadia Boustany, Shady Elmaraghi, Nneamaka Agochukwu, Benjamin Cloyd, Adam J Dugan, Brian Rinker
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):7-14
      Background: Infection following augmentation and prosthetic-based breast reconstruction can cause significant physical and psychological distress for patients. It may delay adjuvant therapies and compromise aesthetic outcomes. The aim of this study is to identify modifiable risk factors for infection and identify common bacterial isolates to achieve optimal outcomes for patients. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed for patients undergoing implant-based breast reconstruction over a 2-year period. In each case, we documented demographics, co-morbidities, complications and antibiotic use. We reviewed treatments, infectious species cultured where applicable and all outcomes. Results: A total of 292 patients met the inclusion criteria. Fifty-five patients (19%) developed an infection. Univariate analysis showed a significantly increased infection rate with longer operative times (P = 0.001) and use of tissue expanders (P = 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed drain use and elevated body mass index (BMI) as risk factors (odds ratio [OR] 2.427 and 1.061, respectively). After controlling for BMI, smoking status and radiation, we found an increased odd of infection with allograft use (OR 1.838) and a decreased odd with skin preparation using 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% isopropyl (OR 0.554), though not statistically significant. Forty of 55 patients with infections had cultures, with 62.5% of isolates being Gram-positive species and 30% Gram-negative species. The median time to clinical infection was 25 days. Implant salvage with surgical interventions was achieved in 61.5% of patients. Conclusions: This study identified judicious use of drains and efficiency in the operating room as modifiable risk factors for infections following implant-based breast reconstruction. Prospective trials to analyse techniques for infection prevention are warranted. Implant salvage following infection is a possible end-point in the appropriate patient.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):7-14
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_215_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Can drains be avoided in lipo-abdominoplasty?

    • Authors: Medha Anand Bhave
      Pages: 15 - 23
      Abstract: Medha Anand Bhave
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):15-23
      Context: Seroma formation is a common complication after lipoabdominoplasty. Conventionally, drains have been placed to prevent seroma; however, there are problems with drains, namely, pain, compromised mobilisation, breakage, tissue irritation and infection. Strategies to prevent seroma, such as the use of glue or quilting sutures have all been attempted with variable and unpredictable benefit. Aims: The author extrapolated the experience with own liposuction protocols to lipoabdominoplasty and began doing away with drains from the year 2006 onwards unless absolutely indicated. Incidence of complications is evaluated here. Settings and Design: This retrospective study is the report of our experience with 204 lipoabdominoplasties performed since 2006 upto December 2016. Subjects and Methods: Consecutive abdominoplasty patients were evaluated for seroma formation, wound dehiscence till suture removal. Nuances of operative details that helped avoid drains were contemplated. Results: Only one patient who had drainless abdominoplasty had seroma formation and wound dehiscence. Conclusions: We found that (a) 'toilet liposuction', (a term the author would like to introduce) (b) multilayer wound closure without tension, (c) avoidance of gliding surfaces d) continuous use of pressure garment for 4 days post-operative and (e) reducing the amount of infiltration are the key factors in avoidance of collections and thus seroma formation. If such a technique is diligently followed, desired results are obtained; yet there is no need to insert drains in most patients. Reducing the need of drains permits early ambulation and better patient comfort without seroma and other complications.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):15-23
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_23_18
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A retrospective analysis of latissimus dorsi–serratus anterior
           chimeric flap reconstruction in 47 patients with extensive lower extremity
           trauma

    • Authors: Ravi Kumar Mahajan, Krishnan Srinivasan, Abhiskek Bhamre, Mahipal Singh, Prakash Kumar, Ankush Tambotra
      Pages: 24 - 32
      Abstract: Ravi Kumar Mahajan, Krishnan Srinivasan, Abhiskek Bhamre, Mahipal Singh, Prakash Kumar, Ankush Tambotra
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):24-32
      Background: Many flaps have been described for reconstruction of lower extremity defects, including, Latissimus Dorsi, Rectus abdominis, Anterolateral thigh perforator flaps, each having advantages and disadvantages. The defect location, size and specific geometric pattern of defect influences the type of flap that can be used. In this case series, we describe the specific situations where the use of chimeric latissimus dorsi–serratus anterior (LD + SA) free flaps are of advantage in providing complete wound cover. Materials and Methods: Case records of all patients who underwent LD + SA free flap transfer for lower extremity trauma at Amandeep Hospital, from Feb 2006 to Feb 2017 were reviewed. Patients were categorised based on the anatomical location and size of defect. The method of usage of the chimeric segments, recipient vessels and type of anastomosis were noted. Flap complications, if any were reviewed. Result: 47 patients with lower limb defects were included in the study. All cases were post traumatic in nature. Defect size ranged from 180 sq cm to 1050 sq cm. Average defect size was 487.70 sq cm. All patients underwent soft tissue reconstruction with LD + SA flap. Complete wound cover was obtained. Conclusion: Latissimus dorsi + Serratus anterior free tissue transfer is an effective, reliable method of providing cover to extensive lower limb traumatic defects with minimal donor site morbidity, with added freedom of inset and flap positioning.Specific use is seen in patients with broad proximal defect, long defect in the leg, defects involving adjacent anatomical areas and in large defect with dead space.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):24-32
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_121_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Reconstruction of Type II abdominal wall defects: Anterolateral thigh or
           tensor fascia lata myocutaneous flaps?

    • Authors: Jammula S Srinivas, Prakash Panagatla, Mukunda Reddy Damalacheru
      Pages: 33 - 39
      Abstract: Jammula S Srinivas, Prakash Panagatla, Mukunda Reddy Damalacheru
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):33-39
      Introduction: Reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects is both challenging and technically demanding for plastic surgeon. Objectives in abdominal wall reconstruction are consistent and include restoration of abdominal wall integrity, protection of intra abdominal viscera and prevention of herniation. Materials: We conducted a retrospective study on five patients in whom lateral thigh flaps such as anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps and tensor fascia lata (TFL) myocutaneous flaps as pedicled or free flaps were used for complex abdominal wall Type II defects over a 5- years period between 2007 and 2012. Results: In two patients, free flaps were used for reconstruction of the upper abdomen and both were ALT. In three patients of lower abdominal defects, one patient had bilateral pedicled ALT flaps, one pedicled TFL myocutaneous and one free TFL myocutaneous in view of ipsilateral electric burn scars. There were no flap losses. Patients were followed up beyond 6 months and found to have a good abdominal contour and only one of five had clinical evidence of herniation. Conclusion: It can be concluded that flap from the Lateral thigh (ALT or TFL) is flap of choice for large Type II abdominal defects. Including vascularised fascia in the flap maintains abdominal wall integrity and use of synthetic mesh is not necessary. Upper abdominal defects need free flaps and in lower abdominal defects a pedicled flap suffices.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):33-39
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_75_15
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Distal major pedicle of sartorius muscle flap: Anatomical study and its
           clinical implications

    • Authors: KN Manjunath, MS Venkatesh, Ashwini Shivaprasad
      Pages: 40 - 45
      Abstract: KN Manjunath, MS Venkatesh, Ashwini Shivaprasad
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):40-45
      Background: Reconstruction of the popliteal region has limited option in terms of muscle flaps or myocutaneous flaps. Gastrocnemius muscle or the myocutaneous flaps are the option for majority of cases. However, reach of Gastrocnemius is limited if the wound is on the distal one-third thigh or the lateral aspect of knee region. Similarly, if the wound injures the muscle, then coverage becomes all the more difficult. Although inferiorly based fasciocutaneous flaps can cover the wound in case of bony injuries, muscle flaps are beneficial as they help in fracture healing. However, in cases with direct gastrocnemius muscle injury or if the wound on the distal one-third thigh or the lateral aspect then the options of muscle flaps is limited. An inferiorly based sartorius muscle can be one suitable alternative to cover this region. Aims and Objective: The aim is to devise an inferiorly based sartorius muscle flap for coverage of lower thigh, popliteal and upper one-third leg region. Objectives: (1) To identify the location of distal major (largest diameter) pedicle in cadavers and its clinical application. (2) To determine the arc of rotation with distal major pedicle as pivot point. Methods: Ten Cadavers and 20 sartorius muscle dissected out. Prior silicone injection onto the femoral vessels was done to identify the location of the perforators for the sartorius muscle. The distance of perforators from anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) measured and the diameter of each perforator by transverse cut measured using callipers. In clinical cases, the arc of rotation was measured by keeping the distal perforator intact as pedicle (detaching the muscle from the ASIS without detaching from the insertion and then rotating it). Results: Out of the 10 cadavers analysed, 6 were male and 4 were female. The mean location of the distal major pedicle was at 35.25 cm from ASIS and range was between 30.4 cm to 38.3 cm. There was no significant variation between right and left limbs in individual cadaver (range 0.2 cm–1.6 cm). The mean diameter of the arterial component of distal major pedicle was 1.54 mm. In three clinical cases where this flap was harvested the arc of rotation were 95°, 110°, 125°. In one of the cases where flap was used to cover the tibial plateau (arc of rotation 155°), distal end of the muscle necrosed. Conclusion: This cadaver study supported by various other studies show that it has sizeable distal pedicle based on which whole muscle can be harvested as flap. In our study, the usual location of this pedicle is at 35 cm from ASIS. The mean diameter of the widest pedicle in distal one-third was 1.54 mm which along with other small diameter pedicle can support the entire muscle. This flap reached up to the infrapatellar region without any vascular compromise.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):40-45
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_127_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Versatile use of dermal substitutes: A retrospective survey of 127
           consecutive cases

    • Authors: Giovanni Nicoletti, Marco Mario Tresoldi, Alberto Malovini, Marco Visaggio, Angela Faga, Silvia Scevola
      Pages: 46 - 53
      Abstract: Giovanni Nicoletti, Marco Mario Tresoldi, Alberto Malovini, Marco Visaggio, Angela Faga, Silvia Scevola
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):46-53
      Background: Dermal substitutes are currently largely used for the treatment of huge skin loss in patients in critical general health conditions, for the treatment of severe burns and to promote the healing process in chronic wounds. Aims: The authors performed a retrospective assessment of their experience with bioengineered skin to possibly identify the most appropriate clinical indication and management for each substitute. Materials and Methods: The study involved 109 patients with 127 skin defects repaired with dermal substitutes over a 9 years period, from 2007 to 2016. Hyalomatrix® was used in 63 defects, whereas Integra® and Nevelia® were used in 56 and 8 defects, respectively. Results: The statistical analysis failed to reveal a correlation between the choice of a specific dermal substitute and any possible clinical variable except in the soft-tissue defects of the scalp where Hyalomatrix® was electively used. Conclusions: In the authors' experience, the scalp defects followed a radical excision of skin tumours that included the periosteum. Here, the preliminary cover with a hyaluronan three-dimensional scaffold constantly allowed for the regeneration of a derma-like layer with a rich vascular network fit for supporting a split-thickness skin graft. Nevertheless, the authors still prefer Integra® when the goal is a better cosmetic outcome and Hyalomatrix® when a faster wound healing is required, especially in the management of deep wounds where the priority is a fast obliteration with a newly formed tissue with a rich blood supply. However, these clinical indications still are anecdotally based.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):46-53
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_217_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • The reverse dorsal metacarpal artery flap in finger reconstruction: A
           reliable choice

    • Authors: Jyoshid R Balan, Shaji Mathew, Pradeep Kumar, Harsh Vardhan, Anto Francis, VG Aniljith, Raj Gopal
      Pages: 54 - 59
      Abstract: Jyoshid R Balan, Shaji Mathew, Pradeep Kumar, Harsh Vardhan, Anto Francis, VG Aniljith, Raj Gopal
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):54-59
      Background: The finger skin and soft-tissue defects are reconstructive challenges due to their nature and the intricate extensor apparatus and flexors it protects. The reverse dorsal metacarpal artery (RDMA) is a time-tested option for the reconstruction of the same. Materials and Methods: A total of 14 cases of RDMA flap for finger defects involving proximal to distal phalanx were performed. Thirteen of these patients were male and one patient female and the most common mode of injury was occupational in nature followed by road traffic accident. The overall appearance was assessed for the flap and the donor site. The associated injuries and the range of motion were noted. Results: All but one flap survived completely. One patient had partial distal flap loss, which was tackled with split-thickness skin grafting. The flap size varied from 3.5 cm × 1.5 cm to 9 cm × 2 cm with mean of 6.64 cm × 1.72 cm. The mean age of the patients was 33.4 years. All the patients had acceptable aesthesis. The donor site had no complications and healed with linear scar. Conclusions: RDMA flap is a reliable flap for finger defects reconstruction. The range of movement mainly depends on the associated injury rather than flap transfer alone and to prove this we require doing analysis of range of movement in patients with flap done alone or with associated injuries.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):54-59
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_37_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Is multiple session of intralesional bleomycin mandatory for complete
           resolution of macrocystic lymphatic malformation?

    • Authors: Vijai Datta Upadhyaya, Ankur Bhatnagar, Basant Kumar, Zafar Neyaz, JS Kishore, Eti Sthapak
      Pages: 60 - 65
      Abstract: Vijai Datta Upadhyaya, Ankur Bhatnagar, Basant Kumar, Zafar Neyaz, JS Kishore, Eti Sthapak
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):60-65
      Background: Intralesional bleomycin scelro-therapy has become a favored line of treatment for macrocystic lymphatic malformations. However the need for multiple sessions is a drawback associated with this treatment modality. Our aim is to document whether multiple session of intra- lesional sclero-therapy is necessary for complete resolution of cystic lymphatic malformation. Method: Intralesional bleomycin under Ultrasound guidance was used for macrocystic lymphangioma at concentration of 3mg/ml but not exceeding the total dose (1mg/kg) body weight for single session or cumulative dose of 5mg/kg. In all cases intralesional sclerosant (ILS) was installed under proper aseptic precaution in operation theatre in general anesthesia or sedation depending on the site or size of lesion and age of the patient. Age of patients at the time of enrolment in study ranged from 3 months to 18 years. Clinical examination was the main stay of diagnosis which was supplemented by USG and/or computed tomography. Compression of the lesion site was done for few hours wherever it was possible after the ILS session. Result: A total of 21 patients included in our study. The age ranged from 3 months to 18 years. Male to female ratio was 8:13. The most common site of involvement was neck and axilla followed by anterior chest wall and nape of the neck. Complete resolution after single session was observed in 90.5% cases where as surgery was required in 9.5% case. Major complication was observed in one patient, who had intralesional bleeding which was managed conservatively. Transient pain and fever was observed in 23.8% of cases. Only two patient required surgical intervention where one had persistent subcutaneous fibrotic nodule and other one did not respond to ILS. Conclusion: Intralesional bleomycin is an effective treatment for macrocystic lesion, and complete resolution may be achieved by single session of ILS if proper principle are followed.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):60-65
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_154_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Use of a plastic eraser for ear reconstruction training

    • Authors: Basar Erdogan, Daichi Morioka, Taishi Hamada, Taro Kusano, Khin Malar Win
      Pages: 66 - 69
      Abstract: Basar Erdogan, Daichi Morioka, Taishi Hamada, Taro Kusano, Khin Malar Win
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):66-69
      Background: Microtia reconstruction is a challenging procedure, especially in developing nations. The most complex part is learning how to fabricate a framework from costal cartilage. We herein propose a training regimen for ear reconstruction with the use of a plastic eraser. Materials and Methods: The texture of a plastic eraser made from polyvinyl chloride is similar to that of human costal cartilage. The first step of the training is carving out the sixth through eighth rib cartilages from a block of plastic eraser. The second step is a fabrication of the framework from plastic rib cartilages, referring to a template from the intact auricle. Results: As plastic erasers are inexpensive and universally available, inexperienced surgeons can repeatedly perform this framework training. Following several of these training sessions in developing nations, the co-authors and local surgeons successfully performed their microtia reconstructions in a reasonable operative time. Conclusions: This realistic carving model allows surgeons to gain experience before performing an actual ear reconstruction, even in resource-constrained circumstances.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):66-69
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_18_18
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Infragluteal fasciocutaneous flap for management of recurrent ischial
           pressure sore

    • Authors: Umesh Kumar, Pradeep Jain
      Pages: 70 - 76
      Abstract: Umesh Kumar, Pradeep Jain
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):70-76
      Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility of infragluteal fasciocutaneous flap in recurrent ischial pressure sore. Materials and Methods: In our study, from 2015 to 2017, nine patients suffering from recurrent ischial sore with scars of previous surgery were managed with infragluteal fasciocutaneous flap. Wound bed was prepared by surgical debridement and negative pressure wound therapy in each case. In two cases, gracilis muscle flap was used as adjuvant to fill up the residual cavity. Donor area of flap was primarily closed. Results: Infragluteal fasciocutaneous flap was used in all nine cases. Superficial distal congestion was present in two cases. Haematoma (1) and infection (1) at flap donor site occurred. Recurrence of ulcer was observed in two cases which were managed by bursectomy and advancement of the bridge segment of the original infragluteal fasciocutaneous flap. All flaps survived without any major complication. Discussion: Ischial pressure sores have a tendency of recurrence after conservative or flap surgery. Scars due to previous surgeries adjacent to the pressure sore preclude the use of local skin or muscle flap. Infragluteal fasciocutaneous flap is a thick reliable fasciocutaneous flap that can be used for resurfacing recurrent ischial pressure sore. This flap has an axial pattern blood supply along with rich subfascial and fascial plexus supplied by various perforators. Conclusion: Infragluteal fasciocutaneous flap is reliable option for managing recurrent ischial sore as it transposes well-vascularised thick fasciocutaneous flap from adjacent posterior thigh and its bridge segment can be further used in case of recurrence.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):70-76
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_15_18
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Autologous emulsified fat injection for rejuvenation of scars: A
           prospective observational study

    • Authors: Lekshmi S Bhooshan, M Geetha Devi, R Aniraj, P Binod, M Lekshmi
      Pages: 77 - 83
      Abstract: Lekshmi S Bhooshan, M Geetha Devi, R Aniraj, P Binod, M Lekshmi
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):77-83
      Background: The skin rejuvenation potential of the autologous emulsified nanofat was studied by Tonnard et al. in 2013. This property is due to the viable adipose-derived stem cells present in the nanofat; although, there are no viable adipocytes. The aim of this study was to determine the aesthetic outcome of autologous emulsified nanofat injection in scars using a standardised and validated Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) and photographs. Materials and Methods: A total of 34 patients with scars of varied aetiologies were included in the study as per inclusion criteria. Pre-operative scoring of the scars with the POSAS scale was done, and photographs were taken. Fat aspiration was done from the lower abdominal wall using syringe liposuction under tumescent anaesthesia. The lipoaspirate was mechanically emulsified, filtered and injected intralesionally into the scar using 26G needle and insulin syringe. Post-operative scar reassessment was done at 3 months with the POSAS scale score and photographs. The improvement in scar characteristics and symptoms were tested statistically using a paired t-test. Pre-operative and post-operative photographic comparison was also done.Results: Out of the 34 patients included in the study, male:female ratio was 22:12. Majority (79.4%) had post-traumatic facial scars. On statistical analysis, there was statistically significant improvement in symptoms such as pain (P = 0.001), itching (P = 0.001), stiffness (P = 0.001), thickness (P = 0.001), colour (P = 0.001), irregularity (P = 0.001) and scar characteristics such as vascularity (P = 0.005), relief (P = 0.001), pliability (P = 0.001), thickness (P = 0.001) and pigmentation (P = 0.001) 3 months after injection. The photographic comparison also showed good aesthetic outcome. Conclusion: Autologous emulsified nanofat injection is effective in improving the scar characteristics as well as symptoms and helps in scar rejuvenation.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):77-83
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_86_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Scalp expansion: Surgical considerations and possible future directions

    • Authors: Edoardo Raposio
      Pages: 84 - 88
      Abstract: Edoardo Raposio
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):84-88
      Introduction: Repairing large scalp defects has always been a difficult task for plastic surgeons. This is because the requirements of such procedures are two-fold: sufficient soft-tissue coverage is required, and to obtain a satisfactory aesthetic outcome, a sufficient number of covering hairs should be ideally provided. Materials and Methods: Based on the author's experience in this repair technique over a 20-year period, this article presents some technical details of scalp expansion, surgical refinements and possible directions for further technical advancement. Results: Data and details on relevant scalp anatomy, expander choice, expander placement, subgaleal undermining, galeotomies and acute scalp expansion are provided. Conclusions: The author hopes that the above-mentioned details may be of some utility in the complex field of scalp expansion.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):84-88
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_209_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Immediate breast reconstruction with a 'modified fleur-de-lis'
           abdominal-free flap in a patient with previous abdominal surgery

    • Authors: Manuel Robustillo, Luis Parra Pont, Georgios Pafitanis, Pedro Ciudad, Daniel Grandes, Israel Iglesias
      Pages: 89 - 92
      Abstract: Manuel Robustillo, Luis Parra Pont, Georgios Pafitanis, Pedro Ciudad, Daniel Grandes, Israel Iglesias
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):89-92
      DIEP flap has become the gold standard method for patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction; however, previous surgery or scars in the abdominal area have been considered a relative contraindication for the use of abdominal tissue. Longitudinal midline abdominal scars may be specially problematic because of the poor midline crossover of blood and the high risk of necrosis of the distal flap. Patients with small breast may be easily reconstructed with hemi-DIEP flap; however, patients with large breast need more tissue available. Our aim is to report a modification of a 'fleur-de-lis pattern' for a breast reconstruction in a patient with previous abdominal surgery and large breast. The post-operative course was uneventful, flap did not show blood supply compromise, volume and symmetry are preserved after 6 months post-operative and donor site morbidity has not been observed. This modification may be very useful to avoid complications related to poor blood supply associated with scar tissues. Careful pre-operative planning and the transfer of only well-vascularised tissue are essential for a successful reconstruction.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):89-92
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_185_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • 'Sausage finger' with 'Rice
           bodies'

    • Authors: Guru Prasad Reddy, Divya Narain Upadhyaya, Riddhi Jaiswal, Madhu Mati Goel
      Pages: 93 - 97
      Abstract: Guru Prasad Reddy, Divya Narain Upadhyaya, Riddhi Jaiswal, Madhu Mati Goel
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):93-97
      Although both pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are commonly encountered in developing countries, tenosynovitis is an uncommon presentation of musculoskeletal TB. TB mimics a lot of other conditions and causes diagnostic dilemma in day-to-day practice. We present the case of a 30-year-old male who presented with the complaints of swelling of right index finger which was initially suspected to be giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath but on histological examination turned out to be tuberculous tenosynovitis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):93-97
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_202_16
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Unclassified congenital deformities of the external ear

    • Authors: Madhubari Vathulya
      Pages: 98 - 100
      Abstract: Madhubari Vathulya
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):98-100
      Congenital ear deformities are a common entity. They are found in isolation or as a part of syndrome in patients. They may involve the external, middle or inner ear or in any of these combinations. Three patients of different ages presented with deformities including mirror image duplication of the superior auricle, unclassified deformities of ear lobule (wavy lobule) and deformity of superior auricle with unclassified variety of lateral ear pit. This article highlights that there are further cases of ear deformities that are noticed in the general population who come for cosmetic correction, and hence, there is a need for further modifying the classification of ear deformities.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):98-100
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_163_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A simple trick to excise the carpal bones during proximal row carpectomy

    • Authors: Warid Altaf, Praveen Bhardwaj, S Raja Sabapathy, Baktash A Haseeb
      Pages: 101 - 102
      Abstract: Warid Altaf, Praveen Bhardwaj, S Raja Sabapathy, Baktash A Haseeb
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):101-102

      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):101-102
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_213_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A novel method to insert drain atraumatically after liposuction in
           gynaecomastia

    • Authors: Sunil Gaba, KS Ajai, Ramesh Kumar Sharma, L Chetan
      Pages: 102 - 103
      Abstract: Sunil Gaba, KS Ajai, Ramesh Kumar Sharma, L Chetan
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):102-103

      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):102-103
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_1_18
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Uses of vessel loops in plastic surgery

    • Authors: Hardeep Singh, Rakesh Kumar Khazanchi, Aditya Aggarwal, Sanjay Mahendru, Vimalendu Brajesh, Sukhdeep Singh
      Pages: 103 - 105
      Abstract: Hardeep Singh, Rakesh Kumar Khazanchi, Aditya Aggarwal, Sanjay Mahendru, Vimalendu Brajesh, Sukhdeep Singh
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):103-105

      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):103-105
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_221_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Pneumothorax: A rare or underreported complication following latissimus
           dorsi muscle flap

    • Authors: Amish Jayantilal Gohil, Subhash Sahu, Shashank Lamba, Ashish Kumar Gupta
      Pages: 105 - 106
      Abstract: Amish Jayantilal Gohil, Subhash Sahu, Shashank Lamba, Ashish Kumar Gupta
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):105-106

      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):105-106
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_126_17
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Prof Bijayalaxmi Nayak (1937–2018)

    • Authors: Ashish Patnaik
      Pages: 107 - 107
      Abstract: Ashish Patnaik
      Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):107-107

      Citation: Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery 2018 51(1):107-107
      PubDate: Wed,30 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_70_18
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2018)
       
 
 
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