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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 429 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 429 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access  
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.127, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access  
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)

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Journal Cover
Indian Journal of Nephrology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.347
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0971-4065 - ISSN (Online) 1998-3662
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [429 journals]
  • Dialysis catheter: “Love–Hate
           Relationship”

    • Authors: TJ Vachharajani
      Pages: 185 - 186
      Abstract: TJ Vachharajani
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):185-186

      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):185-186
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_157_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Carbamylated hemoglobin can differentiate acute kidney injury from chronic
           kidney disease

    • Authors: Y Naresh, N Srinivas, Kiranmayi S Vinapamula, P Pullaiah, P. V. L. N. Srinivasa Rao, V Sivakumar
      Pages: 187 - 190
      Abstract: Y Naresh, N Srinivas, Kiranmayi S Vinapamula, P Pullaiah, P. V. L. N. Srinivasa Rao, V Sivakumar
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):187-190
      Carbamylated hemoglobin (CarHb) was found to have a potential role in the differentiation of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) from chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study was aimed at the evaluation of the diagnostic performance and usefulness of CarHb in the differentiation of AKI from CKD. Forty patients with renal disease and twenty age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Urea, creatinine, Hb, and CarHb were measured in all the subjects. Patients with AKI and CKD were found to have significantly increased levels of CarHb when compared to controls (P < 0.05 for both groups). Patients with CKD had significantly increased levels of CarHb when compared to patients with AKI (P < 0.05). CarHb showed significant positive correlation with urea in patients with renal disease (r = 0.776, P < 0.0001). Significant area under curve (AUC = 0.840, P < 0.0001) was obtained for CarHb and a cut-off value of 98.33 μg VH/g Hb resulted with the best combination of 85% sensitivity and 75% specificity. CarHb may provide clinical utility since patients with AKI and CKD have similar clinical presentation usually. A cut-off value of 98.33 μg VH/g Hb has been found to be useful to differentiate AKI from CKD.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):187-190
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_341_16
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Distribution of virulence factors according to antibiotic susceptibility
           among Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infection

    • Authors: S Derakhshan, M Pourzare, D Roshani
      Pages: 191 - 197
      Abstract: S Derakhshan, M Pourzare, D Roshani
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):191-197
      Escherichia coli is the major causative pathogen of urinary tract infection (UTI) in humans. Virulence and drug resistance play important roles in the pathogenesis of E. coli infections. The aims were to investigate the presence of uropathogenic virulence genes and to evaluate a relationship between antibiotic resistance and virulence in E. coli from UTI. A total of 132 E. coli were collected between April and June 2015 in two hospitals of Sanandaj, Iran. Isolates were examined for susceptibility to 16 antibiotic disks using the disk diffusion method and for possession of virulence genes by polymerase chain reaction. Associations between antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes were investigated. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Of the 132 isolates, the most prevalent virulence gene was pap (31.1%), followed by cnf (28.8%), hly (16.7%), and afa (10.6%). Different patterns of virulence genes were identified. A significant association was detected between the simultaneous presence of hly and pap. The most effective antibiotics were nitrofurantoin, cefoxitin, and imipenem and the least effective were ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and cefotaxime. An association was seen between the presence of cnf and susceptibility to the certain antibiotics, whereas strains with a reduced susceptibility to the certain antibiotics were associated with a significantly increased prevalence of afa and hly (P < 0.05). These findings suggest a correlation between the presence of virulence gene and resistance in E. coli strains from UTI. The results indicate that there is a need for surveillance programs to monitor drug resistance in pathogenic E. coli.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):191-197
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_30_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Interpretation of kidney biopsy in Indian patients older than 60 years: A
           tertiary care experience

    • Authors: PJ Koshy, R Parthsarathy, M Mathew, R Prabakaran, S Kuruvilla, G Abraham
      Pages: 198 - 202
      Abstract: PJ Koshy, R Parthsarathy, M Mathew, R Prabakaran, S Kuruvilla, G Abraham
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):198-202
      The adult population above the age of 60 years has significantly increased in India, with a life expectancy of 68.4 years in 2016. Data regarding the renal histopathology in these patients are scarce though the number of native kidney biopsies done in this subset of population is increasing. The present study is a retrospective analysis of 231 biopsies from a total of 700 biopsies, from patients above 60 years of age (M = 65.8%; F = 34.2%) with a mean age of 64 ± 6.03 years. The indications for kidney biopsy included nephrotic syndrome (NS) (30.4%), nephritic syndrome (19.1%), rapidly progressive renal failure (11.7%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (15.7%), and acute worsening of preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD) (23%). The median percentage of glomerulosclerosis was 22% (5%–45%), and interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy was 30% (10%–50%). The most common cause for nephrotic syndrome was membranous nephropathy (31.4%) and for nephritic syndrome was benign arterionephrosclerosis (22.7%). Postinfectious glomerulonephritis (29.6%) was the leading cause for rapidly progressive renal failure. Acute injury on CKD was notable in patients with diabetic nephropathy (30.2%). The predominant causes for AKI were acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (33.3%), acute tubular necrosis (22.2%), and acute pyelonephritis (19.4%). The biopsy proven histopathological features enabled us in tailoring the therapy. None of the patients developed life-threatening complications following ultrasonography-guided biopsy.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):198-202
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_158_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Adrenocortical suppression in children with nephrotic syndrome treated
           with low-dose alternate day corticosteroids

    • Authors: M Mantan, R Grover, S Kaushik, S Yadav
      Pages: 203 - 208
      Abstract: M Mantan, R Grover, S Kaushik, S Yadav
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):203-208
      Corticosteroids form the mainstay of therapy for all forms of nephrotic syndrome. The long-term use of this medication is associated with serious side effects including adrenocortical suppression. The primary objective of this study was to identify adrenocortical suppression (assessed by single morning serum cortisol levels) in children with nephrotic syndrome on treatment with low-dose alternate day steroids. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics in a tertiary care hospital from January 2014 to January 2015. Seventy children (1–18 years) with nephrotic syndrome (steroid sensitive and resistant) who were in remission and on low-dose alternate day steroids for at least 8 weeks or had received steroids of 2 mg/kg/d for at least 2 weeks in the last 1 year (infrequent relapsers) were enrolled. Relevant history was taken, clinical examination was done and blood samples were drawn for serum cortisol, lipid profile, kidney function tests, fasting blood sugar, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and serum albumin. Forty percent (28/70) children had adrenocortical suppression as assessed by low morning serum cortisol levels. The mean serum cortisol levels were 188 nmol/L and were significantly lower in frequently relapsing individuals (85.9 nmol/L) as compared to other types of nephrotic syndrome (P = 0.05). The prevalence of adrenocortical suppression was higher in steroid-resistant patients (57%) as compared to 28% in frequently relapsing and 11% in steroid-dependent patients. Fifty-seven percent of patients with adrenocortical suppression had short stature while 50% had obesity. All individuals had normal serum HbA1clevels. The cumulative steroid doses and total duration of corticosteroid therapy were significantly higher in patients with adrenocortical suppression. Children with nephrotic syndrome treated with low-dose alternate day steroids have a high prevalence of adrenocortical suppression on screening with single morning cortisol sample. Those with frequently relapsing or steroid-resistant diseases are at a higher risk of suppression.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):203-208
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_80_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Spectrum of IgG4-related kidney disease at a Tertiary Care Center

    • Authors: N Singh, R Nada, A Rawat, A Sharma, SK Sinha, R Ramachandran, V Kumar, HS Kohli, KL Gupta, M Rathi
      Pages: 209 - 214
      Abstract: N Singh, R Nada, A Rawat, A Sharma, SK Sinha, R Ramachandran, V Kumar, HS Kohli, KL Gupta, M Rathi
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):209-214
      IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4 RKD) is increasingly reported with varied manifestations. The present study was carried out to study the spectrum of IgG4 RKD. All patients with renal manifestation associated with conditions known to be associated with IgG4-related diseases (IgG4 RDs), or renal imaging or histology suggestive of IgG4 RKD were included and evaluated further. Patients with known extrarenal IgG4RD were also screened for renal involvement. Out of 40 patients screened over a period of 15 months, IgG4 RKD was diagnosed in 8. Majority were male (87.5%) with mean age being 56 years. Disease spectrum ranged from normal renal function in one to renal failure requiring dialysis in another two patients. Significant proteinuria was uncommon (12.5%) while hematuria was not seen in any patient. Tubulointerstitial nephritis was seen in all four patients who underwent kidney biopsy. Two patients had associated glomerular lesions in the form of immune complex crescentic glomerulonephritis. The most common imaging abnormality was hypodense renal lesions seen in 2 patients. Elevated IgG4 levels had 87.5% sensitivity and 78.3% specificity for IgG4 RKD and levels did not correlate with disease severity. Of 4 patients treated with steroids, 3 showed improvement in renal function. IgG4 RKD is an uncommon disease even at a referral tertiary care center. Elevated IgG4 levels alone are neither sensitive nor specific for the diagnosis of IgG4 RKD, and a combination of clinical, imaging, serological, and histological features are required for diagnosis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):209-214
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_146_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • The spectrum of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis from Eastern India: Is
           it different?

    • Authors: M Trivedi, A Pasari, AR Chowdhury, A Abraham-Kurien, R Pandey
      Pages: 215 - 219
      Abstract: M Trivedi, A Pasari, AR Chowdhury, A Abraham-Kurien, R Pandey
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):215-219
      Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a disease that is defined entirely by its histopathological appearance. The recent Columbian classification has grouped this disease into various types based on the light microscopic description. There is a paucity of data describing the distribution of its various subtypes from the Indian subcontinent. This study was undertaken with the aim to throw light on the epidemiology and clinical features of primary FSGS in Eastern India. This retrospective study includes our cohort of biopsy-proven FSGS who presented to us from June 2009 to July 2011 and the analysis of their presenting clinical and histopathological features from our center in East India. Out of 347 patients diagnosed with FSGS in this period, 224 patients were included in the study. A total of 167 cases were of not otherwise specified (NOS) variant (74.5%), 30 tip variant (13.39%), 14 perihilar (6.25%), 8 cellular (3.57%), and 5 to the collapsing variant (2.23%). The maximum proteinuria at presentation was seen with the tip variant (7.98 ± 6.6 g/24 h), and the renal functions were most deranged at presentation with the collapsing variant. These findings were different from those described in other populations including higher prevalence of the tip and the perihilar variant, significant difference in the degree of hypertension, proteinuria, and renal dysfunction among the different variants. The Columbian classification has helped to stratify the outcomes of this glomerular disease with respect to its clinical presentation as well as histopathological features. However, the characteristics of the various variants do show a distinctive pattern in various populations based on ethnicities.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):215-219
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_115_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Direct-acting antiviral agents in Hepatitis C Virus-infected renal
           

    • Authors: N Prasad, MR Patel, A Pandey, A Jaiswal, D Bhadauria, A Kaul, RK Sharma, S Mohindra, G Pandey, A Goel, A Gupta
      Pages: 220 - 225
      Abstract: N Prasad, MR Patel, A Pandey, A Jaiswal, D Bhadauria, A Kaul, RK Sharma, S Mohindra, G Pandey, A Goel, A Gupta
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):220-225
      Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in renal allograft recipient is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. At present, only few studies related to treatment and outcomes of HCV-infected renal allograft recipients with DAAs have been published. We aimed the study to assess the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir-based regimens in HCV-infected renal allograft recipients. We analyzed data of 22 eligible HCV-infected renal allograft recipients (14 genotype-3, 6 genotype-1, one each genotype-2 and 4) who were treated with DAAs at our institute. DAA regimen included sofosbuvir and ribavirin with or without ledipasvir or daclatasvir for 12–24 weeks. Patients were followed up for 24 weeks after completion of treatment. A rapid viral response of 91%, end of therapy response of 100%, and sustained viral response at 12 and 24 weeks of 100% with rapid normalization of liver enzymes were observed. Therapy was well tolerated except for ribavirin-related anemia. A significant decrease in tacrolimus trough levels was observed and most patients required increase in tacrolimus dose during the study. Treatment with newer DAAs is effective and safe for the treatment of HCV-infected renal allograft recipients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):220-225
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_190_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Rare association of waardenburg syndrome with minimal change disease

    • Authors: G Anvesh, SB Raju, K Prasad, A Sharma, M Surendra
      Pages: 226 - 228
      Abstract: G Anvesh, SB Raju, K Prasad, A Sharma, M Surendra
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):226-228
      Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by varying degrees of hearing loss, pigmentary anomalies, and defects of other neural crest cell-derived structures. The association of WS with renal anomalies has been described in the literature. However, nephrotic syndrome is a very rare association with WS, and only one case has been reported in the literature. We report a case of WS2 associated with biopsy-proven nephrotic syndrome (minimal change disease).
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):226-228
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_55_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance presenting as cryoglobulinemic
           glomerulonephritis: A case report and review of literature

    • Authors: R Goli, Sree Bhushan Raju, MS Uppin
      Pages: 229 - 231
      Abstract: R Goli, Sree Bhushan Raju, MS Uppin
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):229-231
      Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) can present with myriad of morphological features. We report a case of MGRS in a 46-year-old man who presented with nephrotic-range proteinuria and renal insufficiency. Renal biopsy showed amorphous eosinophilic periodic acid–Schiff positive deposits in capillary loops and lamda light chain positivity on immunofluorescence, suggestive of cyoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis. Serum cryoglobulins were positive. Serum immunoelectrophoresis and immunofixation showed a M band of 0.5 g/dl of IgG lambda type. Bone marrow showed 8% of plasma cells which confirmed the diagnosis of MGRS.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):229-231
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_166_16
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Mucormycosis of the thyroid gland: A cataclysmic event in renal allograft
           recipient

    • Authors: N Prasad, R Manjunath, D Bhadauria, R. S. K Marak, RK Sharma, V Agarwal, M Jain, A Gupta
      Pages: 232 - 235
      Abstract: N Prasad, R Manjunath, D Bhadauria, R. S. K Marak, RK Sharma, V Agarwal, M Jain, A Gupta
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):232-235
      Invasive fungal infection is a complication seen in immunocompromised patients. A disseminated fungal infection has a high rate of mortality. Although disseminated infection is known to be seen in most organs, thyroid involvement is rarely reported. Hence, we report a fatal case of thyroid mucormycosis which resulted into laryngeal nerve paralysis and death of a renal allograft recipient.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):232-235
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_192_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Portal vein thrombosis: A rare complication of nephrotic syndrome

    • Authors: DN Gera, J Patel, K Patel, VB Kute
      Pages: 236 - 239
      Abstract: DN Gera, J Patel, K Patel, VB Kute
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):236-239
      Deep vein thrombosis, renal vein thrombosis, and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in children are frequently described complications of nephrotic syndrome (NS). Early diagnosis and treatment with anticoagulants is the key for a good outcome. There are a few reported cases of portal vein and superior mesenteric thrombosis in adults in association with NS. Here, we describe two cases of portal vein thrombosis with variable extent of involvement of superior mesenteric vein in association with relapse of NS. A high degree of suspicion, ultrasonography of the abdomen along with Doppler study of abdominal vessels, and computed tomography angiography can only pick up such unusual sites of thrombosis and facilitate early management.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):236-239
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_25_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Hidden in plain sight: An unusual cause of rapidly progressive renal
           failure

    • Authors: SV Vyahalkar, NM Dedhia, MM Bahadur, GS Sheth, VK Joglekar, VM Sawardekar, SS Khan, SM Shaikh
      Pages: 240 - 243
      Abstract: SV Vyahalkar, NM Dedhia, MM Bahadur, GS Sheth, VK Joglekar, VM Sawardekar, SS Khan, SM Shaikh
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):240-243
      Hyperoxaluria and resultant oxalate nephropathy are infrequently reported causes of irreversible renal failure. A rapid decline in renal function in an otherwise insidiously progressive oxalate nephropathy may be triggered by various superimposed insults like the use of nephrotoxic drugs. We present the case of a patient with rapidly progressive renal failure due to oxalate nephropathy that lead to a retrospective diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. This case highlights the importance of timely assessment for enteric hyperoxaluria in patients with unexplained renal failure of tubulointerstitial nature.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):240-243
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_197_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive
           glomerulonephritis in a case of limited cutaneous scleroderma

    • Authors: H Vora, B Kulkarni, S Singh, N Kulkarni
      Pages: 244 - 246
      Abstract: H Vora, B Kulkarni, S Singh, N Kulkarni
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):244-246
      Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis in a patient of scleroderma is very rare. Very few cases have been reported in English literature. We report a case of a 58-year-old male with long-standing limited cutaneous scleroderma (Scl-70 positive) presenting with normotensive scleroderma renal crisis. Perinuclear ANCA with antimyeloperoxidase antibody was found to be strongly positive. Renal biopsy showed pauci immune-necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis. We believe that this case report will be helpful in understanding clinical features of normotensive ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis in scleroderma patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):244-246
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_292_16
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Pulmonary thromboembolism: A rare but serious complication of nephrotic
           syndrome

    • Authors: S Sandal, K Tiewsoh, N Hansdak, B Parajuli
      Pages: 247 - 248
      Abstract: S Sandal, K Tiewsoh, N Hansdak, B Parajuli
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):247-248

      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):247-248
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_284_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Essential thrombocythemia presenting as paraneoplastic glomerulonephritis

    • Authors: MC Abdulla, S Sathyan, Z Shemin, N Mampilly
      Pages: 249 - 249
      Abstract: MC Abdulla, S Sathyan, Z Shemin, N Mampilly
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):249-249

      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):249-249
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_335_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Cholemic nephrosis from acute hepatitis E Virus infection: A forgotten
           entity?

    • Authors: S Nayak, M Sharma, A Kataria, SC Tiwari, A Rastogi, A Mukund
      Pages: 250 - 251
      Abstract: S Nayak, M Sharma, A Kataria, SC Tiwari, A Rastogi, A Mukund
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):250-251

      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):250-251
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_168_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Kimura&#39;s disease presenting as proliferative glomerulonephritis
           with complete heart block

    • Authors: HS Mahapatra, L Pursnani, H Verma, M Bhardwaj
      Pages: 251 - 253
      Abstract: HS Mahapatra, L Pursnani, H Verma, M Bhardwaj
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):251-253

      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2018 28(3):251-253
      PubDate: Tue,29 May 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijn.IJN_189_17
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 3 (2018)
       
 
 
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