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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access  
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access  
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access  
Heart Views     Open Access  
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access  
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Nephrology
  [SJR: 0.233]   [H-I: 12]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0971-4065 - ISSN (Online) 1998-3662
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Stroke in patients with chronic kidney disease…: How do we approach
           and manage it?

    • Authors: S Nayak-Rao, MP Shenoy
      Pages: 167 - 171
      Abstract: S Nayak-Rao, MP Shenoy
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):167-171
      Renal failure is a potent risk factor for stroke, which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The risk of stroke is 5–30 times higher in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially on dialysis. Case fatality rates are also higher reaching almost 90%. It is therefore important to understand the factors that predispose to stroke in this vulnerable population to better apply preventive strategies. The heightened risk of stroke in CKD represents the interplay of the vascular co-morbidities that occur with renal impairment and factors specific to renal failure such as malnutrition-inflammation-atherosclerosis complex, the effect of uremic toxins, dialysis techniques, vascular access, and the use of anticoagulants to maintain flow in the extracorporeal circuit. Old age, hypertension, diabetes, and previous cerebrovascular disease are all risk factors for stroke with the period of dialysis initiation constituting the highest risk period for developing new stroke. Patients with CKD-stage 3–5 have worse survival and diminished functional outcomes following stroke. Thrombolytic therapy for stroke in CKD has shown an increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or serious systemic hemorrhage, and the therapeutic effects may be attenuated. Benefit of statin therapy in dialysis patient as preventive therapy has not been shown to be beneficial. Control of hypertension and the judicious use of antiplatelet agents form the mainstay of stroke prevention. The benefit of antiplatelet therapies and oral anticoagulants has to be balanced against the real and increased risk of bleeding that is most evident in dialysis cohorts. An increased risk of vascular calcification particularly intracerebral vascular calcification has been seen in patientsreceiving warfarin as prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation. Newer anticoagulants have not been tested in patients with glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min and hence have to be used with caution. This article is a review of stroke in patients with CKD and approach to managing it.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):167-171
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202405
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring &#8211; Kids need it too!

    • Authors: P Pais, A Iyengar
      Pages: 172 - 174
      Abstract: P Pais, A Iyengar
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):172-174

      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):172-174
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.171235
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Hemodialysis vascular access: The perils and potentials

    • Authors: D Banerjee, R Jenkins
      Pages: 175 - 176
      Abstract: D Banerjee, R Jenkins
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):175-176

      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):175-176
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.196935
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Brachiocephalic arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis through the median
           antecubital vein

    • Authors: E Elamurugan, R Hemachandar
      Pages: 177 - 180
      Abstract: E Elamurugan, R Hemachandar
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):177-180
      In patients unsuitable for radiocephalic fistula creation, the next option is brachiocephalic fistula. In such patients, we exploited the venous interconnections in the cubital fossa for median cubital vein-Brachiocephalic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation. In this article, we describe our experience in the creation of such technical variant of the brachiocephalic fistula AVF, its success and associated complications. A retrospective review of such AVF created between September 2014 and August 2015 was done. The data collected included demographics, co-morbidities, basic disease, operative details, patency, complications, and mortality. A total of 68 vascular access surgeries were done which included 26 (38.2%) brachiocephalic AVF using the median antecubital vein. The mean cephalic vein diameter and mean flow rate were 7.18 mm and 1415 ml/min, respectively 2 months after fistula creation. The primary and secondary failure rates were 3.87% and 7.69% respectively. Complications included aneurysm (7.69%), edema (19.23%), hematoma (11.53%), and wound infection (3.8%). Using reverse flow in the median antecubital vein is a safe and simple way to perform brachiocephalic AVF before brachiobasilic AVF and grafts.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):177-180
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.179333
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Postpartum acute kidney injury: Experience of a tertiary care center

    • Authors: MM Mir, MS Najar, AM Chaudary, H Azad, AR Reshi, KA Banday, MA Bhat, IA Wani, MM Wani, M Ursilla
      Pages: 181 - 184
      Abstract: MM Mir, MS Najar, AM Chaudary, H Azad, AR Reshi, KA Banday, MA Bhat, IA Wani, MM Wani, M Ursilla
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):181-184
      Pregnancy-related-acute kidney injury (PR-AKI) had decreased from 40% to 20% in 1960 to <10% in recent series, mostly due to meticulous antenatal management. Postpartum-AKI (PP-AKI) resulting from late obstetric complications has become more apparent after improvement in antenatal care and legalization of medical termination of pregnancy. Women with renal injury in peripartum period admitted to our hospital over a period of 2 years (April 2013 to May 2015) were studied. Of 713 patients of AKI admitted, 61 had PR-AKI with an incidence of 4.27%. Out of the 61 patients, 28 had PP-AKI with an incidence of 1.96%. The mean age of patients with PP-AKI was 26.10 ± 4.3 years. Sepsis was the most common cause accounting for 11 (39.28%) cases followed by postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in 7 (25%) cases. Renal biopsy was done in nine patients, out of whom four were having cortical necrosis. Patients having diffuse cortical necrosis remained dialysis-dependent. High contribution of sepsis and PPH to PP-AKI in our setting makes it an ideal target for rectification. Protocolized peripartum monitoring and standard clinical practices of asepsis will go long way in decreasing the incidence of PP-AKI and maternal morbidity in our valley.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):181-184
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.194391
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • A comparison of practice pattern and outcome of twice-weekly and
           thrice-weekly hemodialysis patients

    • Authors: T Mukherjee, G Devi, S Geetha, NJ Anchan, S Sankara Subbaiyan
      Pages: 185 - 189
      Abstract: T Mukherjee, G Devi, S Geetha, NJ Anchan, S Sankara Subbaiyan
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):185-189
      Renal replacement therapy (RRT) options and practice varies in countries worldwide and is influenced by patients' choice, nephrologists' practice patterns, health system, payer practice, public policy, and socioeconomic factors. In India, hemodialysis (HD) remains the dominant RRT modality, and the practice is largely influenced by socioeconomics of the region of practice since third party payer is limited. Resource stretch to maximize outcome benefit is essential and HD session twice weekly is an improvized and cost-effective clinical practice. However, within the country, the patient characteristics, practice patterns, and outcomes of twice-weekly HD compared against patients dialyzed thrice weekly remain unclear. We did a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent twice- and thrice-weekly HD in a single center under similar settings. The patients on thrice a week dialysis were older and with a higher proportion of diabetics and were insured by private payers. Weight gain, ultrafiltration rates, blood pressures, and hemoglobin remained more favorable in the thrice-weekly patients. There was no significant difference in the hospitalization rates or mortality rates in the two groups. Patients who undergo twice-weekly HD have poorer intermediate measures of the outcome; although, morbidity and survival were not different in a small study population with short follow-up. The small sample size and the short duration of follow-up may limit the scope of findings of our study.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):185-189
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202844
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The relationship between metabolic acidosis and nutritional parameters in
           patients on hemodialysis

    • Authors: AD Sajgure, TA Dighe, JS Korpe, CB Bale, AO Sharma, NS Shinde, AA Goel, AV Mulay
      Pages: 190 - 194
      Abstract: AD Sajgure, TA Dighe, JS Korpe, CB Bale, AO Sharma, NS Shinde, AA Goel, AV Mulay
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):190-194
      The progressive loss of kidney function is accompanied by metabolic acidosis. The relationship between metabolic acidosis, nutritional status, and oral bicarbonate supplementation has not been assessed in the Indian chronic kidney disease (CKD) population who are on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). This is a single-center prospective study conducted in the Western part of India. Thirty-five patients, who were receiving MHD were assessed for metabolic acidosis along with various nutritional parameters at the baseline and at the follow-up after 3 months, postcorrection of acidosis with oral sodium bicarbonate supplements. The relationship between the correction of metabolic acidosis with oral bicarbonate supplements and changes in dietary and various nutritional parameters were evaluated. Metabolic acidosis at the baseline evaluation was found in 62.86% cases of the cohort with a mean serum bicarbonate value of 20.18 ± 4.93 mmol/L. The correction of acidosis with increment in the mean dosage of oral sodium bicarbonate supplements from 0.69 ± 0.410 mmol/kg/day at baseline to 1.04 ± 0.612 mmol/kg/day, significantly reduced the prevalence of metabolic acidosis to 23.33% cases at the follow-up. Improvement in serum bicarbonate level showed significant dietary, anthropometric, and nutritional improvements in these patients. Hence, we conclude that correction of metabolic acidosis with optimal oral bicarbonate supplementation plays a pivotal role in the treatment of malnourished CKD patients on MHD.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):190-194
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202404
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Baseline anti-blood group antibody titers and their response to
           desensitization and kidney transplantation

    • Authors: BV Shah, P Rajput, ZA Virani, S Warghade
      Pages: 195 - 198
      Abstract: BV Shah, P Rajput, ZA Virani, S Warghade
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):195-198
      In recent years, immunological barriers historically considered as absolute contraindications to transplantation are being reevaluated. One such barrier is the ABO blood group incompatibility. With better understanding of immunological mechanisms and effective various regimens for controlling it, ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) kidney transplantation is now being performed with increasing frequency. For good outcome, most important is to achieve and maintain low anti-blood group antibody titers (ABGATs). Twenty-two patients with ABO-I donors have been studied. The anti-A and anti-B antibody titers (IgG and IgM) were estimated by column agglutination technology using Automated Ortho BioVue System. For desensitization, pretransplant plasmapheresis and/or immunoadsorption and rituximab were used. ABGAT was determined before transplant and periodically after transplant. It was observed that one-third of the patients have low baseline ABGAT. In these cases with low ABGAT, transplant can be performed without any desensitization. In those with titers <1:256, rituximab (two doses of 200 mg weekly) and 3–6 sessions of plasmapheresis can bring down titers to <1:32. In those with titers >1:256, immunoadsorption may be used from the beginning to reduce ABGAT. After transplant, the titers drop to <1:8 in majority. Rise in titers to >1:64 require close observation and biopsy. If there is evidence of antibody-mediated rejection, treatment should be promptly started. Rise in titers 4–6 weeks after transplant is not associated with any graft dysfunction, and hence not of any clinical significance.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):195-198
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202402
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Prosthetic hemodialysis access-induced distal hand ischemia and its
           contributors in diabetics

    • Authors: SM Alamshah, I Nazari, A Nahidi, M Sametzadeh, S Khodabakhshi
      Pages: 199 - 204
      Abstract: SM Alamshah, I Nazari, A Nahidi, M Sametzadeh, S Khodabakhshi
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):199-204
      Avoidance of hand ischemia in the construction of prosthetic access for hemodialysis in diabetics that have no suitable vein for arteriovenous fistula is appreciated. Taper type may be an appropriately matched conduit to prevent its occurrence. This is a prospective controlled trial of 38 selected diabetics requiring hemodialysis, who were referred to our clinic during a period of 6 months. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of tapered grafts in preventing distal hand hypoperfusion and determining its most likely contributors. In 18 intervening cases, taper 4 mm × 7 mm and in twenty cases (control group), standard 6 mm polytetrafluoroethylene as straight Brachial-Axillary access was used. Graft flow rates, artery and vein diameters, and mean arterial pressure were included for evaluation. Within the control group, 11 patients (55%) (7 cases Grade 1, 3 Grade 2, 1 Grade 3) and in intervening group, 2 cases (11%) (Grade 1, Grade 3) developed Steal syndrome. There was no significant difference in the mean flow rates (P = 0.82). Increased risk of distal hypoperfusion was observed in the control group when flow rates were more than 1000 ml/min. Arterial diameters (P = 0.011) and mean arterial pressure (P = 0.05) were found to be important contributing factors. Taper grafts causes reduced incidence of distal hand hypoperfusion. When artery diameter was <6 mm and mean arterial pressure lower than 100 mmHg and the index (brachial artery diameter × mean arterial pressure) was under 500, distal hand ischemia occurred in standard and tapper type. We therefore recommend selective usage of taper grafts in diabetics with diminished distal hand pulses, considering the contributing factors when fistula first is not feasible.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):199-204
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202836
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • A single-center experience of kidney transplantation from donation after
           circulatory death: Challenges and scope in India

    • Authors: S Singh, S Kumar, S Dasgupta, DB Kenwar, M Rathi, A Sharma, HS Kohli, V Jha, KL Gupta, M Minz
      Pages: 205 - 209
      Abstract: S Singh, S Kumar, S Dasgupta, DB Kenwar, M Rathi, A Sharma, HS Kohli, V Jha, KL Gupta, M Minz
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):205-209
      Donation after circulatory death (DCD) has never been attempted in India because of legal constraints and lack of guidelines for the withdrawal of life support in end-of-life situations. The present report describes the initial experience of transplantation of organs from DCD donors in a tertiary care center in India. Between 2011 and 2015, five donors had kidneys retrieved after cardiac arrest. These patients were declared dead after waiting for 5 min with no electrocardiographic signal on monitor following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which was restarted in three patients till organ retrieval. All donors received heparin and underwent rapid cannulation of aorta, infusion of preservative cold solution, and immediate surface cooling of organs during retrieval surgery. 9/10 kidneys were utilized. Mean donor age was 29.6 ± 16.3 years, M:F 4:1 and mean age of recipients was 38.7 ± 10.8 years, M:F 7:2. Seven patients required dialysis in postoperative period. Mean postoperative day 0 urine output was 1.9 ± 2.6 L. Baseline creatinine achieved was 1.38 ± 0.35 mg/dl after a mean duration of 26.12 ± 15.4 days. Kidneys from donors where CPR was continued after the declaration of death (n = 3) had better recovery of renal function (time to reach baseline creatinine 21.2 ± 7.2 vs. 34.3 ± 23.7 days, baseline creatinine 1.36 ± 0.25 vs. 1.52 ± 0.45 mg%). In donors without CPR, one kidney never functioned and others had patchy cortical necrosis on protocol biopsy, which was not seen in the kidneys from donors with CPR. Kidneys from DCD donors can serve as a useful adjunct in deceased donor program. Continuing CPR after the declaration of death seems to help in improving outcomes.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):205-209
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202843
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Successful renal transplantation across HLA barrier: Report from India

    • Authors: G Aggarwal, AK Tiwari, P Dorwal, R Chauhan, D Arora, RC Dara, V Kher
      Pages: 210 - 214
      Abstract: G Aggarwal, AK Tiwari, P Dorwal, R Chauhan, D Arora, RC Dara, V Kher
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):210-214
      Organ donors are sometimes found “unsuitable” due to the presence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies in the recipient. In recent years, improved desensitization protocols have successfully helped to overcome HLA incompatibility hurdle. We present three cases where optimum desensitization was achieved in patients with the donor-specific anti-HLA antibody (DSA) leading to successful renal transplantation. All patient–donor pair underwent HLA typing, complement dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch (CDC-XM), flow cytometry XM (FC-XM), and panel reactive antibody. If any of the three tests was positive, single antigen bead assay was performed to determine the specificity of the anti-HLA antibody (s). Patients with DSA were offered organ-swap or anti-HLA antibody desensitization followed by transplantation. Desensitization protocol consisted of single dose rituximab and cascade plasmapheresis (CP) along with standard triple immunosuppression. The target DSA mean fluorescence index (MFI) was <500, along with negative CDC-XM and FC-XM for both T- and B-cells. Three patients with anti-HLA DSA, who did not find a suitable match in organ swap program, consented to anti-HLA antibody desensitization, followed by transplantation. Mean pre-desensitization antibody MFI was 1740 (1422–2280). Mean number of CP required to achieve the target MFI was 2.3 (2–3). All the three patients are on regular follow-up and have normal renal function test at a mean follow-up of 8 months. This report underlines successful application of desensitization protocol leading to successful HLA-antibody incompatible renal transplants and their continued normal renal functions.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):210-214
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.200518
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Unusual case of acute lung injury in a renal allograft recipient

    • Authors: U Anandh, S Marda
      Pages: 215 - 217
      Abstract: U Anandh, S Marda
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):215-217
      A renal allograft recipient developed cough with hemoptysis on the 1st postoperative day. A chest X-ray was performed which was suggestive of fluid overload. His fluid was restricted and diuretics were added. On the same day, his pulmonary infiltrates worsened and a computed tomography (CT) of the chest was carried out, which was suggestive of the right lower lobe consolidation and left pleural effusion. He underwent a bronchoscopy and the lavage was sent for cultures, which did not grow any infective organism. Besides routine antibiotics, treatment for possible cytomegalovirus, fungal infections, and pneumocystis infection was instituted. Noninvasive ventilation was started on day 8. A repeat CT of the chest on the postoperative day 8 showed further worsening of the pulmonary infiltrates. As all the initial cultures and serology were negative, a possibility of interstitial pneumonitis was considered. Mycophenolate sodium was considered as a possible cause of the lung infiltrates and was withdrawn. The patient showed progressive improvement. His antibiotics were withdrawn. He was discharged on day 14. A repeat CT 4 weeks post transplant showed significant improvement in his pulmonary pathology. The acute lung injury was considered to be a drug reaction secondary to mycophenolate sodium. In a renal allograft recipient with persistent pulmonary infiltrates, interstitial involvement secondary to drugs should be considered if the patient does not improve with the standard treatment measures.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):215-217
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202827
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Postrenal transplant metastatic colonic neoplasm: Posttransplant
           lymphoproliferative disorder or adenocarcinoma?

    • Authors: H Lal, P Yadav, M Dey, N Kumar
      Pages: 218 - 221
      Abstract: H Lal, P Yadav, M Dey, N Kumar
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):218-221
      Transplant recipients are vulnerable to a horde of infections and neoplastic conditions due to immunosuppression. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a condition unique to the transplant recipient occurring due to monoclonal lymphocytic proliferation. It may affect any organ system with reportedly highest incidence in the gastrointestinal tract. The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the colon, however, has not been shown to be uniformly higher in transplant recipients. We report here an unusual case of adenocarcinoma of the ascending colon presenting with liver, lymph node and skin metastasis in a transplant recipient, which simulated PTLD both clinically and radiologically. For any gastrointestinal lesion in transplant recipient, the possibility of carcinoma must be considered. However, a high index of suspicion for PTLD facilitates early diagnosis since the treatment of the two conditions is starkly different.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):218-221
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.200519
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Clinical and genetic profile of Indian children with primary hyperoxaluria

    • Authors: A Pinapala, M Garg, N Kamath, A Iyengar
      Pages: 222 - 224
      Abstract: A Pinapala, M Garg, N Kamath, A Iyengar
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):222-224
      Primary hyperoxaluria (PH) has heterogeneous renal manifestations in infants and children. This often leads to delay in diagnosis. In the past 3 years, genetic samples were sent for seven children with a clinical diagnosis of PH. Their medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and outcomes. Of the seven children, three were males. The median age of presentation was 4.9 years with the youngest presenting at 3 months of age. Nephrolithiasis, the most common presentation was associated with renal dysfunction in two children. Two children with no significant history presented in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The sibling of one of the children in ESRD, with a history of consanguinity in parents, was screened for asymptomatic nephrolithiasis. Bilateral multiple renal calculi were found in majority of children followed by echogenic kidneys on ultrasound examination. Genetic analysis suggested PH Type 1 in five children and type 2 in two children. The mutations detected in our cohort were different from the previously reported common mutations. There was no obvious genotype-phenotype correlation noticed. Three children in ESRD are on maintenance dialysis. Nephrolithiasis being a common presentation of PH needs prompt evaluation. Mutations are generally population specific, and whole gene sequence analysis is critical in diagnosis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):222-224
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202831
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Amelogenesis imperfecta with distal renal tubular acidosis: A novel
           syndrome?

    • Authors: RA Misgar, Z Hassan, AI Wani, MI Bashir
      Pages: 225 - 227
      Abstract: RA Misgar, Z Hassan, AI Wani, MI Bashir
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):225-227
      Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects. It has rarely been reported in association with multiorgan syndromes and metabolic disorders. The metabolic disorders that have been reported in association with AI include hypocalciuria, impaired urinary concentrating ability, and Bartter-like syndrome. In literature, only three cases of AI and distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) have been described: two cases in adults and a solitary case in the pediatric age group. Here, we report a child with AI presenting with dRTA; to the best of our knowledge, our reported case is the only second such case in pediatric age group. Our case highlights the importance of recognizing the possibility of renal abnormalities in patients with AI as it will affect the long-term prognosis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):225-227
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202826
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • De Novo collapsing glomerulopathy in renal allograft in association with
           BK virus nephropathy in a child and stabilization of renal function by
           elimination of viremia

    • Authors: DN Gera, MK Shah, VA Ghodela, VB Kute, HL Trivedi
      Pages: 228 - 230
      Abstract: DN Gera, MK Shah, VA Ghodela, VB Kute, HL Trivedi
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):228-230
      Well-recognized association between HIV 1 infection and collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) raises the possibility that intrarenal infection by other viruses may also contribute to the development of this lesion in native or post-transplant kidneys. There is evidence in literature about association of these lesions with cytomegalovirus, Epstein–Barr virus, hepatitis C virus, and parvovirus B19 infections. Here, we present a case report of post-transplant BK virus nephropathy in a male child who was found to have CG in subsequent biopsy 2 months later. His renal function and proteinuria were stabilized on elimination of viremia.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):228-230
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.200516
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Acute ciprofloxacin-induced crystal nephropathy with granulomatous
           interstitial nephritis

    • Authors: R Goli, KK Mukku, SB Raju, MS Uppin
      Pages: 231 - 233
      Abstract: R Goli, KK Mukku, SB Raju, MS Uppin
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):231-233
      Crystal-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is caused by the intratubular precipitation of crystals, which results in obstruction and kidney injury. Ciprofloxacin, a commonly used antibiotic, causes AKI secondary to immune-mediated interstitial injury. Rare mechanisms of ciprofloxacin-induced renal injury include crystalluria, rhabdomyolysis, and granulomatous interstitial nephritis. Clinical and experimental studies have suggested that crystalluria and crystal nephropathy due to ciprofloxacin occur in alkaline urine. Preexisting kidney function impairment, high dose of the medication, and advanced age predispose to this complication. We report a case of ciprofloxacin-induced crystal nephropathy and granulomatous interstitial nephritis in a young patient with no other predisposing factors. The patient responded to conservative treatment without the need for glucocorticoids.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):231-233
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.200522
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • A case of chylothorax in a hemodialysis patient with left innominate
           venous stenosis

    • Authors: M Limesh, A Desai, PG Kedalaya, S Renuka
      Pages: 234 - 236
      Abstract: M Limesh, A Desai, PG Kedalaya, S Renuka
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):234-236
      Chylothorax is defined as accumulation of chyle-containing lymphatic fluid within the pleural space. Chylothorax is very rarely seen in hemodialysis patients. We report a case of a patient on hemodialysis who developed chylothorax secondary to left innominate vein stenosis, with other features of venous hypertension such as arm edema successfully treated with angioplasty and pigtail drainage.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):234-236
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202829
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Successful treatment of multiple angiomyolipomas with sirolimus in a child

    • Authors: K Pabedinskas, M Kobrzynski, G Filler
      Pages: 237 - 238
      Abstract: K Pabedinskas, M Kobrzynski, G Filler
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):237-238
      Tuberous sclerosis complex frequently results in the formation of renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs). Sirolimus (SIR) or everolimus can be used to treat large AMLs, although this treatment has rarely been described in children, particularly for multiple renal AMLs. A 15-year-old girl presented with bilateral severe chronic flank pain coinciding with increased renal size and hundreds of renal AMLs. We opted to treat her with SIR over the course of 3.5 years. Following her treatment, her renal size had substantially decreased and the AMLs had shrunk. The patient's pain subsided as well. Our case, which has never been described in published literature, demonstrates that a child with multiple renal AMLs can be treated with SIR, and suggests that this treatment may be a viable option for preventing the development of secondary morbidities such as chronic pain.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):237-238
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.200520
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Lumps all over: A case of chronic tophaceous gout (Harrison syndrome)

    • Authors: SP Mirgh, MP Venkatesh
      Pages: 239 - 240
      Abstract: SP Mirgh, MP Venkatesh
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):239-240

      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):239-240
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202842
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Reusing immunoadsorption column – Making the ABO incompatible renal
           transplant affordable

    • Authors: PK Jha, AK Tiwari, SK Sethi, V Kher
      Pages: 241 - 242
      Abstract: PK Jha, AK Tiwari, SK Sethi, V Kher
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):241-242

      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):241-242
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202832
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Nephrotoxicity in a patient treated with pemetrexed

    • Authors: Y Zajjari, M Azizi, Y Sbitti, D El Kabbaj
      Pages: 243 - 244
      Abstract: Y Zajjari, M Azizi, Y Sbitti, D El Kabbaj
      Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):243-244

      Citation: Indian Journal of Nephrology 2017 27(3):243-244
      PubDate: Wed,3 May 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.202403
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3 (2017)
       
 
 
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