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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 354 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Dermatology
  [SJR: 0.448]   [H-I: 16]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0019-5154
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [354 journals]
  • Editorial epilogue

    • Authors: Koushik Lahiri
      Pages: 551 - 554
      Abstract: Koushik Lahiri
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):551-554

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):551-554
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_532_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Treatment of melasma: The journey ahead

    • Authors: Rashmi Sarkar, Pallavi Ailawadi
      Pages: 555 - 557
      Abstract: Rashmi Sarkar, Pallavi Ailawadi
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):555-557

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):555-557
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_487_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Medical management of melasma: A review with consensus recommendations by
           Indian pigmentary expert group

    • Authors: Rashmi Sarkar, Narendra Gokhale, Kiran Godse, Pallavi Ailawadi, Latika Arya, Nilendu Sarma, RG Torsekar, VK Somani, Pooja Arora, Imran Majid, G Ravichandran, Mohan Singh, Sanjeev Aurangabadkar, Shehnaz Arsiwala, Sidharth Sonthalia, T Salim, Swapnil Shah
      Pages: 558 - 577
      Abstract: Rashmi Sarkar, Narendra Gokhale, Kiran Godse, Pallavi Ailawadi, Latika Arya, Nilendu Sarma, RG Torsekar, VK Somani, Pooja Arora, Imran Majid, G Ravichandran, Mohan Singh, Sanjeev Aurangabadkar, Shehnaz Arsiwala, Sidharth Sonthalia, T Salim, Swapnil Shah
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):558-577
      Melasma is one of the most common hyperpigmentary disorders found mainly in women and dark-skinned patients. Sunlight, hormones, pregnancy, and genetics remain the most implicated in the causation of melasma. Although rather recalcitrant to treatment, topical agents such as hydroquinone, modified Kligman's Regime, azelaic acid, kojic acid, Vitamin C, and arbutin still remain the mainstay of therapy with sun protection being a cornerstone of therapy. There are several new botanical and non botanical agents and upcoming oral therapies for the future. There is a lack of therapeutic guidelines, more so in the Indian setup. The article discusses available evidence and brings forward a suggested treatment algorithm by experts from Pigmentary Disorders Society (PDS) in a collaborative discussion called South Asian Pigmentary Forum (SPF).
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):558-577
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_489_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Chemical peels in melasma: A review with consensus recommendations by
           Indian pigmentary expert group

    • Authors: Rashmi Sarkar, Shehnaz Arsiwala, Neha Dubey, Sidharth Sonthalia, Anupam Das, Latika Arya, Narendra Gokhale, RG Torsekar, VK Somani, Imran Majid, Kiran Godse, G Ravichandran, Mohan Singh, Sanjeev Aurangabadkar, T Salim, Swapnil Shah, Surabhi Sinha
      Pages: 578 - 584
      Abstract: Rashmi Sarkar, Shehnaz Arsiwala, Neha Dubey, Sidharth Sonthalia, Anupam Das, Latika Arya, Narendra Gokhale, RG Torsekar, VK Somani, Imran Majid, Kiran Godse, G Ravichandran, Mohan Singh, Sanjeev Aurangabadkar, T Salim, Swapnil Shah, Surabhi Sinha
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):578-584
      Melasma is a notorious dermatosis, often resistant to treatment. Chemical peeling constitutes an acceptable option of management of melasma (of any type and duration). In this article, as a group of experts from Pigmentary Disorders Society (PDS) in collaboration with South Asian Pigmentary Forum (SPF), we have tried to elaborate the various chemical peeling agents for the treatment of melasma. Besides, we have reviewed the indications, mechanism of action, rationality and the detailed procedure of peeling. The evidence in favor of various peeling agents have been summarized as well.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):578-584
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_490_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Lasers in melasma: A review with consensus recommendations by Indian
           pigmentary expert group

    • Authors: Rashmi Sarkar, Sanjeev Aurangabadkar, T Salim, Anupam Das, Swapnil Shah, Imran Majid, Mohan Singh, G Ravichandran, Kiran Godse, Shehnaz Arsiwala, Latika Arya, Narendra Gokhale, Nilendu Sarma, RG Torsekar, Sidharth Sonthalia, VK Somani
      Pages: 585 - 590
      Abstract: Rashmi Sarkar, Sanjeev Aurangabadkar, T Salim, Anupam Das, Swapnil Shah, Imran Majid, Mohan Singh, G Ravichandran, Kiran Godse, Shehnaz Arsiwala, Latika Arya, Narendra Gokhale, Nilendu Sarma, RG Torsekar, Sidharth Sonthalia, VK Somani
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):585-590
      Lasers have come up as the newest therapeutic modality in dermatological conditions including melasma. In this article, as a group of experts from Pigmentary Disorders Society in collaboration with South Asian Pigmentary Disorders Forum (SPF), we have tried to discuss the lasers which have been used in melasma and formulate simple consensus guidelines. Following thorough literature search, we have summarised the rationale of using the lasers and the supporting evidences have also been provided. It is clear that laser cannot be the first line treatment for melasma. However, it can be used as an adjuvant therapy in resistant cases, provided the selection of patient and counselling has been done properly.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):585-590
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_488_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Facial acanthosis nigricans: A morphological marker of metabolic syndrome

    • Authors: Saumya Panda, Anupam Das, Koushik Lahiri, Manas Chatterjee, Tanmay Padhi, Sanjay Rathi, Sandipan Dhar, Nilendu Sarma
      Pages: 591 - 597
      Abstract: Saumya Panda, Anupam Das, Koushik Lahiri, Manas Chatterjee, Tanmay Padhi, Sanjay Rathi, Sandipan Dhar, Nilendu Sarma
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):591-597
      Introduction: Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a frequently encountered entity. Facial AN (FAN) is a subset of AN which is being increasingly recognized. Recently, reports hypothesizing the association of FAN with features of metabolic syndrome have been published. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to study the clinicodemographic profile of patients with FAN, and to assess the correlation of hypertension, increased waist–hip ratio (WHR), increased body mass index (BMI), type 2 diabetes mellitus, deranged lipid profile, serum insulin, and impaired oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (parameters of metabolic syndrome) in these patients, as well as to determine the most significant predictor (highest relative risk) of development of FAN. Methods: A multicentric case–control study was conducted (123 cases in each group) over a period of 2 years. Data were obtained on the basis of history, examination, and relevant laboratory investigations. Statistical analysis was done using Statistica version 6 (StatSoft Inc., 2001, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA), SPSS statistics version 17 (SPSS Inc., 2008, Illinois, Chicago, USA), and GraphPad Prism version 5 (GraphPad Software Inc., 2007, San Diego, California, USA). Results: Mean age of the patients with FAN was 38.83 ± 8.62 years. Mean age of onset of the disease was 30.93 ± 8.18 years. The most common site of face involved was the forehead and temporal region. The most common pigmentation was brown-black. Male sex, positive OGTT, increased WHR, and increased BMI were most significantly related to FAN. Smoking was found to have a protective effect against the development of FAN. Conclusion: Here, we document a significant association between male patients with positive OGTT, increased WHR, and BMI and FAN. Thus, we propose that FAN could be considered a morphological marker of metabolic syndrome.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):591-597
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_545_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Occult hepatitis B virus infections (often with human herpesvirus 7
           co-infection) detected in Pityriasis rosea patients: A pilot study

    • Authors: Abhishek De, Subrata Roy, Soumi Sukla, Asad Ansari, Subhajit Biswas
      Pages: 598 - 605
      Abstract: Abhishek De, Subrata Roy, Soumi Sukla, Asad Ansari, Subhajit Biswas
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):598-605
      Background: The etiopathogenesis of Pityriasis rosea (PR), a papulo-squamous skin disease, remains elusive and hypothesized to be caused primarily by human herpesvirus (HHV) 6 or 7 or immune dysfunction. Aims: The recent increasing incidences of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, including asymptomatic occult HBV infections (OBIs), in a densely populated city in India, prompted us to investigate whether PR patients (from varied socioeconomic and immune status) harbor the underlying HBV infections. These cases were also investigated for HHV 6 and 7 infections. Materials and Methods: DNA from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood samples from PR-diagnosed individuals (n = 13; mostly young adults) and healthy controls (n = 11) were subjected to virus gene-specific polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) for HBV and HHV 6 and 7. PCR products of expected length, when observed, were sequenced (bidirectional) using overlapping primers. Sequences were identified by NCBI BLAST and analyzed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic studies. The blood samples were tested for HBsAg by EIA. Results: In 5/13 PR samples, only HBV DNA (4/5 being HBsAg negative) was detected, providing first-time evidence that PR may be manifested in asymptomatic HBV carriers. 6/13 cases were HHV 7 (not HHV 6) DNA positive, providing confirmatory molecular genetic evidence for the first time of PR association with HHV 7 from India. Surprisingly, 5/6 HHV 7-positive PR cases were also HBV positive. Overall, 10/13 PR samples showed evidence of HBV infection. 8/13 were OBI, harboring at least one OBI-signature S protein mutation. All healthy controls were HBsAg EIA and PCR negative. Conclusions: 77% of PR patients presented the evidence of underlying HBV infection (genotype D2), suggestive of horizontal HBV transmission. This warrants for mass HBV vaccination. PR patients should be tested for underlying virus infections for appropriate therapy and management.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):598-605
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_235_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Clinico-epidemiological study of congenital ichthyosis in a tertiary care
           center of Eastern India

    • Authors: Arghyaprasun Ghosh, Rahul Ahar, Gobinda Chatterjee, Neha Sharma, Shruti Alhad Jadhav
      Pages: 606 - 611
      Abstract: Arghyaprasun Ghosh, Rahul Ahar, Gobinda Chatterjee, Neha Sharma, Shruti Alhad Jadhav
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):606-611
      Background: Congenital ichthyoses comprises various specific genetic diseases and can range from mild to very severe presentation. Furthermore, these may be associated with various syndromes. There is scanty data regarding the demographic profile and clinical features of patients with congenital ichthyosis in India. Aims and Objectives: The aim is to evaluate the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of various types of congenital ichthyoses. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted for 1 year from April 2013 to March 2014. Patients were evaluated for epidemiological profile and clinical features. Results: During the study of 1 year, 106 patients of congenital ichthyoses were identified. The most common of the various ichthyoses was ichthyosis vulgaris, followed by lamellar ichthyosis, X-linked recessive ichthyosis. One case of Netherton syndrome and one of ichthyosis hystrix were also identified. Conclusion: Various types of congenital ichthyoses present with different clinical features which range from mild to severe. These present with significant psychological stress to both patients and their families. Furthermore, all these diseases have significant implications of transmission to their offspring.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):606-611
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_411_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Clinical, histopathological characteristics and immunohistochemical
           findings in lichen planus pigmentosus

    • Authors: Ramesh M Bhat, Teena Ramesh Mathanda, CS Jayaprakash, Sukumar Dandakeri
      Pages: 612 - 617
      Abstract: Ramesh M Bhat, Teena Ramesh Mathanda, CS Jayaprakash, Sukumar Dandakeri
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):612-617
      Background: Lichen planus pigmentosus (LPP), a rare variant of lichen planus, is reported in various ethnic groups, more often from the Indian subcontinent and the Middle East. Aims: Although the condition is encountered quite often by dermatologists of this region, the data on the clinical, pathological, and immunohistochemical (IHC) aspects of LPP are limited. This prospective study is aimed towards filling this lacuna. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from thirty clinically diagnosed cases of LPP who presented to the dermatology outpatient department. Skin biopsy and blood investigations were conducted and the specimens were further analyzed for their histopathological features and IHC staining for CD4+, CD8+ T-lymphocyte subsets along with CD45RO (UCHL-1), and CD68. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: The study showed a female preponderance (56.7%). Photo aggravation as a precipitating cause was seen in 40% of the individuals. The lesions with duration <4 months had a more intense inflammatory infiltrate on histology. CD4+ and CD8+ cells showed very good Pearsons correlation on statistical analysis. CD45 was seen in association with CD8+, and staining for CD68 to assess the macrophage density showed a close correlation with CD45RO. Limitations: Small sample size. Conclusion: LPP represents a misguided lesional immune response pattern. The intense inflammatory infiltrate seen in the early lesions necessitates prompt treatment to arrest progression which may prevent the chronic pigmentary phase of the disease.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):612-617
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_148_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Cutaneous adverse drug reactions in a tertiary care teaching hospital in
           India: An intensive monitoring study

    • Authors: Sejal Thakkar, Tejas K Patel, Roshni Vahora, Prakash Bhabhor, Raksha Patel
      Pages: 618 - 625
      Abstract: Sejal Thakkar, Tejas K Patel, Roshni Vahora, Prakash Bhabhor, Raksha Patel
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):618-625
      Background: The epidemiological data based on intensive monitoring studies are limited for the cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs) in terms of incidence. Most of earlier Indian studies focused only on types and causative drugs of CADRs. Aim: The aim of this study is to analyze the CADRs with reference to the incidence, its subgroup analysis, causative drugs, and other clinical characteristics in Indian population. Methodology: Intensive monitoring study was carried out over a period of 3 years in the dermatology outpatient and inpatient department. CADRs due to only systematically administered drugs were considered. The WHO definition for CADR, the WHO causality definitions, modified Schumock and Thornton's criteria for preventability, and International Conference on Harmonisation E2A guidelines for seriousness were considered. Incidence was expressed in percentage and its 95% confidence interval. The incidence was analyzed on basis of characteristics of study population and CADRs. Results: A total of 171 CADRs were observed from 37,623 patients. The CADR incidence was 0.45% (95% CI: 0.39–0.53). The incidence did not significantly differ in different age groups and gender. Commonly observed CADRs were maculopapular rash (23.98%), urticaria (21.64%), and fixed drug eruptions (FDEs) (18.13%). Antimicrobials (35.18%) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were suspected in all common CADRs. Anti-infective and NSAIDs were most commonly suspected drugs in overall CADRs, maculopapular rash, urticaria, FDEs, and erythema multiforme. The exact nature of drugs remained inaccessible in one-fourth cases due to use of the over-the-counter self-medications. The incidence of preventable and serious and fatal CADRs was 0.08% (95% CI: 0.05–0.11), 0.04% (95% CI: 0.02–0.06), and 0.003% (95% CI: 0.000–0.001), respectively. Conclusion: Ethnic characteristics should be considered while interpreting incidence from the international studies. The demographic characteristics of study population do not affect the incidence of CADRs. Indian patients should be sensitized about hazards of self-medications.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):618-625
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_703_16
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Inpatient mortality resulting from dermatological disorders at a tertiary
           care center in Eastern India: A record-based observational study

    • Authors: Satyendranath Chowdhury, Indrashis Podder, Abanti Saha, Debabrata Bandyopadhyay
      Pages: 626 - 629
      Abstract: Satyendranath Chowdhury, Indrashis Podder, Abanti Saha, Debabrata Bandyopadhyay
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):626-629
      Background: Contrary to popular perception, several dermatological conditions may be associated with lethal outcome in the absence of timely intervention or due to complications. Aims: The aim was to estimate the number of deaths and analyze their causes due to skin disorders at a tertiary level inpatient dermatology ward. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective, record-based observational study involving 538 patients spanning over 4 years (2013–2016) at our dermatology indoor setup. Results: There were 45 deaths (male:female = 1.5:1), accounting for 8.4% or total admissions, occurring mostly in patients in their 7th decade. Vesiculobullous disorders were the most frequent cause of mortality (57.8%), followed by drug reactions accounting for 17.8% of cases. In the former group pemphigus vulgaris accounted for most deaths (31.1%) followed by bullous pemphigoid (17.8%) and pemphigus foliaceus (8.9%), whereas toxic epidermal necrolysis was the most frequent cause of death from drug reactions (8.9%). Almost half of all deaths (48.9%) occurred due to septicemia followed by cardiopulmonary complications (40%). Most of the cases presented to us at an advanced state of the disease previously being treated inappropriately. Conclusion: Prompt diagnosis and treatment of such dermatological conditions are mandated, preferably in an intensive care set-up, to reduce mortality rates. Advanced age, the area of skin involvement, mucosal involvement, and septicemia were adverse prognostic factors in these patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):626-629
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_284_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Usefulness and utility of NACO regime in the management of sexually
           transmitted infections: A pilot study

    • Authors: Anupam Das, Pramit Ghosh, Ishita Ghosh, Rittwika Bhattacharya, Abul Kalam Azad Sardar, Sebanti Goswami, Debabrata Bandyopadhyay, Nilay Kanti Das
      Pages: 630 - 634
      Abstract: Anupam Das, Pramit Ghosh, Ishita Ghosh, Rittwika Bhattacharya, Abul Kalam Azad Sardar, Sebanti Goswami, Debabrata Bandyopadhyay, Nilay Kanti Das
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):630-634
      Introduction: Treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) has been made easy for field workers due to syndromic approach. The etiological agent responsible for different STI syndromes needs to be validated from time to time so as to guide the therapeutic regimen. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the etiological agent for STI syndromes and correlate the syndromic diagnosis with etiological diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted over 9 months in all patients attending the STI and Gynaecology Outpatient Department. Syndromic diagnosis was done by STI-trained medical officer of respective clinic. Sample was collected for etiological diagnosis and subjected to relevant investigations. Data were analyzed by applying statistical methods. Results: Among 308 patients (male:female = 1:3.5), no syndromic diagnosis could be made in 11 cases (all females and had premalignant changes on Pap smear). In 68 patients (22.08%), no etiological diagnosis could be arrived at (mostly genital ulcer disease [GUD]-herpetic [H] and vaginal discharge). In cervical discharge syndrome, six patients (16.7%) showed gonococcus. In GUD-H syndrome, 37 patients (27.027%) were tested positive. In GUD-nonherpetic syndrome, three patients (33.33%) were syphilis, granuloma inguinale, and chancroid (1 each). In urethral discharge syndrome, etiology could not be found in 33 cases (45.45%). In vaginal discharge syndrome (n = 217), etiologies were overlapping as follows: trichomonas vaginalis (76.04%), bacterial vaginosis (40%), gonococcus (24%), and undiagnosed (6.5%). Conclusion: The present tool for validation of GUD-H can validate only 27% of cases. Overlap of etiologies is mostly common in vaginal discharge syndrome, wherein malignancies and premalignant conditions are overtreated with kits. Validation can be done only in two-third of cases with the available resources. However, syndromic approach provides the opportunity of treating STI without delay.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):630-634
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_114_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Use of fine needle aspirate from peripheral nerves of pure-neural leprosy
           for cytology and polymerase chain reaction to confirm the diagnosis: A
           follow-up study of 4 years

    • Authors: Abhishek De, Abu Hena Hasanoor Reja, Ishad Aggarwal, Sumit Sen, Amrita Sil, Basudev Bhattacharya, Nidhi Sharma, Asad Ansari, Aarti Sarda, Gobinda Chatterjee, Sudip Das
      Pages: 635 - 643
      Abstract: Abhishek De, Abu Hena Hasanoor Reja, Ishad Aggarwal, Sumit Sen, Amrita Sil, Basudev Bhattacharya, Nidhi Sharma, Asad Ansari, Aarti Sarda, Gobinda Chatterjee, Sudip Das
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):635-643
      Background: Pure neural leprosy (PNL) still remains a diagnostic challenge because of the absence of sine qua non skin lesions of leprosy and a confirmatory diagnostic method. The authors had earlier described a simple yet objective technique of combining fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) coupled with a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a pilot study, wherein the technique showed promise of a reliable diagnostic tool. In the pursuit of further evidence, the authors carried out a 4-year study with PNL cases to find the efficacy and reliability of the said method in a larger sample size. Aim: This study was conducted to find the efficacy, reliability, and reproducibility of FNAC coupled with multiplex PCR and Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining in identifying the cases of PNL. Materials and Methods: All cases that were suspected to be suffering from PNL, following evaluation by two independent observers were included in the study and were subjected to FNAC from the affected nerve, and the aspirates were evaluated for cytology, ZN staining, and multiplex PCR for Mycobacterium leprae genome. In addition, serum anti-PGL1 levels were also performed in all the study subjects. Fifteen non-PNL cases were also included in the control arm. Results: A total of 47 cases were included in the test arm and subjected to FNAC. Conventional ZN staining could demonstrate acid-fast bacilli (AFB) in only 15 out of 47 cases (31.91%) while M. leprae DNA could be elicited in 37 (78.72%) cases by the multiplex PCR. Only 13 (27.65%) out of 47 cases showed anti-PGLI-1 antibody positivity. On cytological examination of the nerve aspirates, only 11 (23.40%) cases showed epithelioid cells whereas nonspecific inflammation was seen in 26 (75.60%) cases. Conclusion: The results of this study conducted over a larger sample size corroborate with the findings of our pilot study. In a resource poor set up, FNAC in combination with ZN staining and multiplex PCR is a rapid, simple, and easily performed test, which can give a reproducible and objective diagnosis in cases of PNL.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):635-643
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_115_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Electrophysiological study of nerves in type-II reaction in leprosy

    • Authors: Santosh Kumar Singh, Sunil Kumar Gupta, RD Mukhija, AK Thacker
      Pages: 644 - 648
      Abstract: Santosh Kumar Singh, Sunil Kumar Gupta, RD Mukhija, AK Thacker
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):644-648
      Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection primarily affecting the peripheral nervous system, skin and reticuloendothelial system. Cutaneous nerves are severely affected in lepra reaction and this leads to morbidity. Objective: To study electrophysiological pattern of different nerves involved in Type-II reactions in leprosy. Method: The present study was undertaken in 21 leprosy patients with Type-II reactions attending in and out-patient department of Dermatology & Venereology, B.R.D. Medical College, Gorakhpur from July 2005 to October 2006. This was a prospective case control study in which 20 healthy, age and sex matched people with no evidence of any disease (particularly nerve involvement) were included. Limitation: Lesser number of cases were studied. Result: The proximal motor conduction latency was significantly prolonged in both ulnar and common peroneal nerve and proximal motor conduction velocity was also significantly reduced. On examining the values beyond 2S.D. of the control value, distal latency was not affected and only proximal conduction was affected in ulnar nerve. Conclusion: In Type II lepra reaction the motor conduction abnormalities are not prominent. Abnormalities are relatively more marked in the proximal segment.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):644-648
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_38_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Detection of anti-basement membrane zone antibodies in the blister fluid
           in subepidermal autoimmune bullous diseases

    • Authors: Ravindran Surya, Bobbili Tejasvi, Shrutakirthi D Shenoi, Sathish Pai, Chythra Rao, Raghavendra Rao
      Pages: 649 - 653
      Abstract: Ravindran Surya, Bobbili Tejasvi, Shrutakirthi D Shenoi, Sathish Pai, Chythra Rao, Raghavendra Rao
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):649-653
      Background: Subepidermal autoimmune bullous diseases (sAIBD) are diverse of conditions with clinicopathological overlap. Circulating autoantibodies in the serum can be demonstrated using indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) microscopy. Artificially split normal human skin is considered as an optimum substrate for the demonstration of anti-basement membrane zone (BMZ) antibodies using IIF in sAIBD; it not only helps to detect the presence of circulating antibodies in the serum but also helps to subclassify these conditions into “roof” and “floor” binding disorders. Aim: In this study, we evaluated the utility of IIF to detect anti-BMZ antibodies in the blister fluid of patients with sAIBD. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two patients with a clinical diagnosis of sAIBD were enrolled in the study. IIF of serum and blister fluid were done simultaneously using salt-split skin as a substrate. Results: Anti-BMZ antibodies could be detected in the blister fluid using IIF in all patients in the study group. Limitation: We could not do enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of blister fluid. This would have given us the quantitative data of circulating antibodies in the blister fluid. Conclusion: Blister fluid offers an alternate source for the detection of autoantibodies in patients with sAIBD. It may be of particular help in children and in elderly with poor venous access.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):649-653
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_403_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Calcified Keratoacanthoma with Tumoral Calcinosis in a 10-year-old Boy: A
           mere Co-incidence?

    • Authors: Anupam Das, Indrashis Podder, Sabari Bhattacharya, Ramesh Chandra Gharami, Prabir Kumar Jash
      Pages: 654 - 657
      Abstract: Anupam Das, Indrashis Podder, Sabari Bhattacharya, Ramesh Chandra Gharami, Prabir Kumar Jash
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):654-657
      Keratoacanthoma (KA) is a rapidly evolving benign cutaneous tumor, occurring in elderly individuals with a tendency towards spontaneous regression and histopathologic similarity to squamous cell carcinoma. Tumoral calcinosis is an uncommon condition, associated with the deposition of painless calcific masses. The occurrence of these two conditions in the same patient is a rarity itself, whereas deposition of calcium within the KA lesion in our 13-year-old patient makes it even more intriguing. Such an association has been seldom reported in the literature, and this prompted the current report.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):654-657
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_304_16
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • “i hair”: A prognostic marker in alopecia areata &
           trichotillomania

    • Authors: Subrata Malakar, Purva Ranjit Mehta
      Pages: 658 - 660
      Abstract: Subrata Malakar, Purva Ranjit Mehta
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):658-660
      Trichoscopy as an investigative tool is revolutionizing the diagnosis of hair disorders. The use of a trichoscope has unveiled a plethora of signs which not only helps in decoding the underlying tricoscopic condition but also acts as prognostic markers. Herein, we present a new trichoscopic sign, “i hair” in alopecia areata and trichotillomania. “i hair” are short hairs with an accentuated distal end. There may be a thin hypopigmented shaft just beneath the darker distal end, thus making them resemble the alphabet “i.”
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):658-660
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_337_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Cutaneous cysts with nail dystrophy in a young female: A classical
           association

    • Authors: Romana Ghosh, Kingshuk Chatterjee, Jayanta Kumar Barua, Anupam Roy
      Pages: 661 - 664
      Abstract: Romana Ghosh, Kingshuk Chatterjee, Jayanta Kumar Barua, Anupam Roy
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):661-664
      Pachyonychia Congenita (PC) refers to a group of autosomal dominant disorders with variable clinical presentations. While nail dystrophy and plantar keratoderma are the most consistent features in all the variants, a myriad of other manifestations has been observed. This report highlights a case of young female presenting with multiple asymptomatic cutaneous cysts associated with plantar kearatoderma and nail dystrophy. Similar nail changes were evident in her son also. Such clinical presentation, in corroboration with histopathological evaluation of the cutaneous cyst prompted us to make a diagnosis of Pachyonychia Congenita type II.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):661-664
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_473_16
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Rational for drug dosimetry and duration of terbinafine in the context of
           recalcitrant dermatophytosis: Is 500 mg better than 250 mg OD or BD?

    • Authors: Kabir Sardana, Aastha Gupta
      Pages: 665 - 667
      Abstract: Kabir Sardana, Aastha Gupta
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):665-667

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):665-667
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_435_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Author&#39;s reply

    • Authors: P Ravindra Babu, AJ S Pravin, Gaurav Deshmukh, Dhiraj Dhoot, Aniket Samant, Bhavesh Kotak
      Pages: 667 - 669
      Abstract: P Ravindra Babu, AJ S Pravin, Gaurav Deshmukh, Dhiraj Dhoot, Aniket Samant, Bhavesh Kotak
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):667-669

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):667-669
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_496_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Contact dermatitis due to quackery

    • Authors: Niral Sheth, Pragya Ashok Nair
      Pages: 669 - 670
      Abstract: Niral Sheth, Pragya Ashok Nair
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):669-670

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):669-670
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_459_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Mycobacterium leprae or tuberculosis: A diagnostic dilemma

    • Authors: Pugazhenthan Thangaraju, Sajitha Venkatesan, Elavarasan Sivashanmugam, MK Showkath Ali
      Pages: 671 - 671
      Abstract: Pugazhenthan Thangaraju, Sajitha Venkatesan, Elavarasan Sivashanmugam, MK Showkath Ali
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):671-671

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):671-671
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_472_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Follow-up data of rituximab as adjuvant therapy in pemphigus

    • Authors: Uday S Khopkar, Akansha Anil Chadha, MS N. Nitya, Vikram Lahoria
      Pages: 671 - 673
      Abstract: Uday S Khopkar, Akansha Anil Chadha, MS N. Nitya, Vikram Lahoria
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):671-673

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):671-673
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_303_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Trichoscopy: A text and atlas

    • Authors: Abhishek De
      Pages: 674 - 674
      Abstract: Abhishek De
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):674-674

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):674-674
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_514_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Topical corticosteroids abuse: A clinical study of cutaneous adverse
           effects

    • Authors: Soniya Meena, Lalit Kumar Gupta, Ashok Kumar Khare, Manisha Balai, Asit Mittal, Sharad Mehta, Garima Bhatri
      Pages: 675 - 675
      Abstract: Soniya Meena, Lalit Kumar Gupta, Ashok Kumar Khare, Manisha Balai, Asit Mittal, Sharad Mehta, Garima Bhatri
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):675-675
      Background: Topical corticosteroids (TC) are one of the most widely used agents in dermatology practice. Misuse of these agents may lead to a wide range of adverse effects. Aim: This study was conducted to assess the magnitude of abuse of topical corticosteroids (TC) and clinical patterns of cutaneous adverse effects amongst patients attending dermatology department of a teaching hospital at South Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: All patients who reported with adverse effects of topical steroids during one year from September 2015 to August 2016 were evaluated. Patients fulfilling the study criteria were registered for further workup. Results: Out of the 85280 new patients, 370 (0.43%) presented with adverse effects of TC. Males (232/370;62.70%) outnumbered females (138/370;37.30). Age group 11-30 years was most commonly (74.05%) affected. The main reason for using TC was fungal infection (52.43%). Tinea incognito (49.46%) and acne (30.27%) were the most common adverse effects recorded. Conclusions: Abuse of TC, particularly the superpotent and potent is rampant amongst general population. Topical corticosteroids are frequently used for indications where they should be avoided.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):675-675
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_110_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Red eccrine chromhidrosis with review of literature

    • Authors: Ashok Kumar Jaiswal, Shilpashree P Ravikiran, Prasoon Kumar Roy
      Pages: 675 - 675
      Abstract: Ashok Kumar Jaiswal, Shilpashree P Ravikiran, Prasoon Kumar Roy
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):675-675
      A 22-year-old male presented with reddish discoloration of the vest following perspiration for 6 months. He was a habituated consumer of cranberry juice. The peak absorption on spectrophotometric analysis of the extracted sweat coincided approximately with the peak absorption of diluted distillate of the juice. A diagnosis of eccrine chromhidrosis, probably due to the coloring agents in the juice, was considered. This rare case report emphasizes the possible side effect of the various coloring agents used as food additives.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):675-675
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_755_16
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas: Case report of two cases

    • Authors: Shashank Mishra, Divya Shelly, KV Vinu Balraam, Reena Bharadwaj
      Pages: 675 - 675
      Abstract: Shashank Mishra, Divya Shelly, KV Vinu Balraam, Reena Bharadwaj
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):675-675
      Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a unique, heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders which have a primary cutaneous manifestation in the absence of systemic involvement of lymph nodes, bone marrow, or visceral organs at the time of diagnosis. Among the primary cutaneous lymphomas, B-cell lymphoma is much less common and accounts for 20%–25% of cases. Primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (PCDLBCLs) are aggressive neoplasms with poor prognosis. Early and accurate diagnosis is required as these patients respond well to systemic anthracycline-based chemotherapy (R-CHOP). In this article, we report two cases of PCDLBCL, other which presented with rapidly enlarging skin nodules and were diagnosed based on clinical features, histomorphology, and characteristic immunohistochemical expression. Both the patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy and responded well. During the 6 months' follow-up period, the lesions regressed. The patients are symptom free with no evidence of disease relapse or dissemination to extracutaneous sites.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):675-675
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_83_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • A fatal case of febrile ulceronecrotic mucha-habermann disease presenting
           as toxic epidermal necrolysis

    • Authors: Chenjing Xing, Hong Shen, Junzhu Xu, Zehu Liu, Jun Zhu, Aie Xu
      Pages: 675 - 675
      Abstract: Chenjing Xing, Hong Shen, Junzhu Xu, Zehu Liu, Jun Zhu, Aie Xu
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):675-675
      Febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease (FUMHD), a severe form of pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta, is an inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology manifested by ulcerative and necrotic lesions accompanied by systemic manifestations. The mortality rate of FUMHD is about 15%. It is reported here a case of FUMHD presenting as toxic epidermal necrolysis that resulted in multiple organ failure and death.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):675-675
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_631_16
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The bumpy face of che guevara: An interesting case

    • Authors: Kingshuk Chatterjee, Anupam Roy, Romana Ghosh, Jayanta Kumar Barua, Saswati Halder, Gautam Banerjee
      Pages: 675 - 675
      Abstract: Kingshuk Chatterjee, Anupam Roy, Romana Ghosh, Jayanta Kumar Barua, Saswati Halder, Gautam Banerjee
      Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):675-675
      Placement of decorative tattoo on the skin may lead to various immunological, infective, and coincidental complications. Inoculation of human papillomavirus leading to development of verruca is an uncommon complication of tattoos. The present report highlights the development of verruca vulgaris, developing after 2 years of tattooing in a young male.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(6):675-675
      PubDate: Fri,24 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijd.IJD_1_17
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Relapsed primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type

    • Authors: Shaohua Wu, Wei Gui, Liping Su, Yanfeng Xi
      Pages: 676 - 676
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