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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 429 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 429 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access  
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access  
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access  
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access  
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.127, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access  
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.604, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)

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Journal Cover
Indian Journal of Dental Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.266
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0970-9290
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [429 journals]
  • Moving forward in dentistry with FDI

    • Authors: Kathryn Kell
      Pages: 261 - 261
      Abstract: Kathryn Kell
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):261-261

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):261-261
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_482_18
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • “Real-World” craniofacial surgery requires “Medical
           Multitasking”

    • Authors: SM Balaji
      Pages: 262 - 262
      Abstract: SM Balaji
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):262-262

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):262-262
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_431_18
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Knowledge and awareness of dental implants as a treatment choice in adult
           population in South India: A hospital-based study

    • Authors: Anoop Mayya, Joana D'Souza, Ann Mary George, Kamalakanth Shenoy, Praveen Jodalli, Shreemathi S Mayya
      Pages: 263 - 267
      Abstract: Anoop Mayya, Joana D'Souza, Ann Mary George, Kamalakanth Shenoy, Praveen Jodalli, Shreemathi S Mayya
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):263-267
      Context: Implant-supported prosthesis improves the self-confidence and quality of life of the patient by giving them masticatory comfort and a high level of satisfaction. For any professional community, it is essential to know whether patients feel well informed and whether what they know reflects on the current advances in dental health care. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and awareness of dental implants as a treatment choice in patients visiting a dental college situated in Mangalore, Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 13 close-ended questions was used to assess the level of knowledge and awareness among patients visiting prosthodontics outpatient department regarding dental implants as a treatment option for replacing missing teeth. A total of 242 participants were interviewed to collect the required data. Chi-square test was used to study the association between demographic variables and awareness about implantation. Results: Only 17.8% of the population with missing teeth knew about dental implants as a treatment choice. For 69.8% of the population, the source of information regarding prosthetic options was through friends and relatives, and for 28.1%, it was from dentists. Awareness percentage was significantly higher among males (P = 0.024) and among those whose education level was graduation and above (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study showed that knowledge and awareness regarding dental implants was disturbingly low. The patients had a very minimal and superficial knowledge regarding prosthetic options. Emphasis is placed on the need for conducting and implementing various public awareness campaigns and for establishing counseling centers.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):263-267
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_92_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Preventive endodontics by direct pulp capping with restorative dentin
           substitute-biodentine: A series of fifteen cases

    • Authors: Kavita Dube, Pradeep Jain, Arti Rai, Bonny Paul
      Pages: 268 - 274
      Abstract: Kavita Dube, Pradeep Jain, Arti Rai, Bonny Paul
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):268-274
      Introduction: Treatment of mechanical exposure of the pulp during caries excavation presents a clinical challenge. In this case series of 15 patients, with a follow-up period of over a year, the outcome of direct pulp capping with Biodentine (septodont) after mechanical pulp exposure was assessed. Aim of Study: The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of direct pulp capping with Biodentine in deeply carious teeth when pulp was mechanically exposed during caries excavation and cavity preparation. Vital pulps exposed during caries excavation in molar teeth were treated with 3% sodium hypochlorite for 2 min. If adequate hemostasis was achieved, the pulp tissue was capped with Biodentine, which covered the entire pulpal floor. This was followed by the placement of a layer of resin-modified glass ionomer cement and a final layer of composite resin (Filtek Z350-3M) to complete the restoration. The patients were recalled periodically and evaluated for any evidence of pulpal/periapical pathology. Results: In the follow-up period that ranged from 12 to 24 months, all teeth were asymptomatic. Conclusion: Biodentine appears to be a suitable material for direct pulp capping under clinical conditions. However, long-term follow-up studies and controlled trials involving a large sample size are warranted.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):268-274
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_292_15
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Bruxism and oral health-related quality of life among male inmates in a
           penal institution, Mysore: A cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Ravi Kumar Thetakala, BR Chandrashekar, S Sunitha, M Maurya, Priyanka Sharma, G Shubhi
      Pages: 275 - 279
      Abstract: Ravi Kumar Thetakala, BR Chandrashekar, S Sunitha, M Maurya, Priyanka Sharma, G Shubhi
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):275-279
      Background: One of the widespread problems of oral health is bruxism and is defined as a parafunctional habit with involuntary grinding and gnashing of the teeth occurring during sleep. However, bruxism is connected to anxiety and stress, but the published literature on bruxism among prison inmates is scanty. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of active sleep bruxism and its impact on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among inmates in Central Penal Institution, Mysore. Materials and Methods: The study was cross sectional and conducted among eligible male inmates at Central Penal Institution, Mysore. The information on active sleep bruxism and OHRQoL was collected using a predesigned structured questionnaire by means of personal interview by a trained investigator. The active sleep bruxism was assessed using the criteria of American Academy of Sleep Medicine and OHRQoL through modified oral health impact profile (OHIP-14). The data analysis was done using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, t-test, analysis of variance, and linear regression model. Results: A total of 212 male inmates aged between 18 and 80 years were considered for the study. The prevalence of active sleep bruxism among the study population was 31.6%. The mean OHIP-14 score was significantly higher (P < 0.001) among the inmates having active sleep bruxism (38.52 ± 12.8) suggesting a high oral health impact as compared to inmates without this disorder (31.67 ± 12). Conclusion: The prevalence of active sleep bruxism was higher among the inmates of penal institution as compared to the general population. The active sleep bruxism had a negative impact on OHRQoL.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):275-279
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_203_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on interleukin-34 levels in
           periodontal health and disease

    • Authors: CN Guruprasad, AR Pradeep
      Pages: 280 - 285
      Abstract: CN Guruprasad, AR Pradeep
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):280-285
      Background: Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a recently identified alternative ligand for colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor plays an important role in osteoclastogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the IL-34 levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and plasma in subjects with chronic periodontitis and to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on the GCF and plasma IL-34 levels. Materials and Methods: Thirty individuals (age range: 30–56 years) were selected and divided into groups based on the gingival index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, and radiologic parameters (bone loss): Group I (15 individuals with healthy periodontium), Group II (15 individuals with chronic generalized periodontitis) while Group II patients after 8 weeks of the treatment (scaling and root planning) constituted Group III. GCF samples and plasma samples were collected to estimate the levels of IL-34 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results: The mean IL-34 concentration in GCF and plasma was highest for Group II compared to Group I and decreased after nonsurgical periodontal therapy in chronic generalized periodontitis group. The difference between them was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: IL-34 can be considered as an “inflammatory marker” of periodontal disease and can be explored in the future as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of periodontal disease.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):280-285
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_527_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Cephalometric aspects of thalassemic children in the Indian subcontinent:
           A cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Amit Anand Samba, Praveen Haricharan Bhoopathi, Rajasekaran Meenakshi Sundaram, Anil Kumar Patil, Balaji Vishwanatham Gupta, Vishwa Tejashwar Rao
      Pages: 286 - 290
      Abstract: Amit Anand Samba, Praveen Haricharan Bhoopathi, Rajasekaran Meenakshi Sundaram, Anil Kumar Patil, Balaji Vishwanatham Gupta, Vishwa Tejashwar Rao
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):286-290
      Objectives: To compare the cephalometric characteristics of thalassemic children in the Indian subcontinent with the controls, matched for sex and dental age. Methodology: A total of 31 thalassemic children were a part of the study. Cephalometric readings were recorded for the study and the control group. Results: Within the Group I stage, the anterior cranial base length was 68.40±2.93 mm, shorter when compared to the control group. In the Group II stage, the maxillary/mandibular angle was 31.58° for the case group and the mandibular length was shorter in comparison to the controls. In the Group III stage, the SNB angle was 76.42°, lesser than the control group. A relative maxillary prognathism of 9.88 mm and 12.85 mm was observed in thalassemic males and females respectively through the Wiley's analysis. Conclusion: The overall picture depicted a retruded position of the maxilla and a retrognathic mandible within the study group. A class II profile has also been observed among the study subjects.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):286-290
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_32_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Canonical Wnt pathway gene expression and their clinical correlation in
           oral squamous cell carcinoma

    • Authors: Madhulaxmi Marimuthu, Manoharan Andiappan, Abdul Wahab, MR Muthusekhar, Anandan Balakrishnan, Sambandham Shanmugam
      Pages: 291 - 297
      Abstract: Madhulaxmi Marimuthu, Manoharan Andiappan, Abdul Wahab, MR Muthusekhar, Anandan Balakrishnan, Sambandham Shanmugam
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):291-297
      Aim: The aim of this study is to explore the prognostic significance and clinicopathological correlations of the Wnt pathway genes in a cohort of surgically treated patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. Settings and Design: A prospective genetic study on patients with OSCC was carried out during the period from July 2014 to January 2016. Informed consent from patients and institutional ethical approval for the study was obtained and the guidelines were strictly followed for collection of samples. Subjects and Methods: Clinical data and mRNA expression analysis of ten genes in the canonical Wnt pathway were evaluated and their relationships with clinical and demographic variables were studied in 58 tissue samples. Wnt-3a, β-catenin, secreted frizzled-related proteins sFRP-1, sFRP-2, sFRP-4, sFRP-5, Wnt inhibitory factor 1, dickkopf-1, c-MYC, and cyclin-D1 from cancer (n = 29) and normal (n = 29) tissue samples were investigated using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the sample characteristics and clinical variables. If the data were normal, then parametric tests were used; otherwise, nonparametric alternatives were used. All the analyses were carried out using SPSS version 23.0 (IBM SPSS Inc., USA). Results: Expression of sFRP-1, sFRP-2, and sFRP-5 in control samples and expression of c-MYC and cyclin D1 in cancer samples showed statistical significance. Significant expression of Wnt3A was observed among patients who had recurrence and were deceased. Conclusion: Wnt3A, β-catenin, and cyclin D1 are recognized as key components of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. However, in this study, there was no significant expression of all the three genes in OSCC. The proto-oncogene c-MYC showed statistically significant upregulation in cancer tissue samples suggesting that the OSCC among South Indian population is primarily not mediated by the canonical Wnt signaling pathway.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):291-297
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_375_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of periodontal response to nonsurgical therapy in pre- and
           post-menopausal women with periodontitis

    • Authors: Chinta Sumadhura, Jammula Surya Prasanna, Chinta Sindhura, Parupalli Karunakar
      Pages: 298 - 302
      Abstract: Chinta Sumadhura, Jammula Surya Prasanna, Chinta Sindhura, Parupalli Karunakar
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):298-302
      Context: The influence of sex steroid hormones on periodontium can be lowered with good plaque control. Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate periodontal status in pre- and post-menopausal women with periodontitis following nonsurgical therapy. Settings and Design: Interventional pre–post clinical trial. Subjects and Methods: Periodontal status was measured by periodontal index (PRI), and oral hygiene status was measured by plaque index (PI). Both the parameters were measured at baseline, i.e. before scaling and root planing and after 3 months intervals posttreatment. Statistical Analysis Used: IBM SPSS version 21. Results: The mean PRI scores in premenopausal group were 5.68 ± 0.64 and 2.53 ± 0.13 and PI scores were 1.84 ± 0.17 and 0.91 ± 0.13, respectively, at baseline and 3 months. The mean PRI scores in postmenopausal group were 6.08 ± 0.47 and 2.54 ± 0.12 and PI scores were 1.86 ± 0.25 and 1.00 ± 0.24, respectively, at baseline and 3 months. Conclusions: There was more desirable response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in both the groups but not much variation in between two groups.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):298-302
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_205_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • A comparative study to evaluate the efficacy of lycopene and curcumin in
           oral submucous fibrosis patients: A randomized clinical trial

    • Authors: Gargi Saran, Deepak Umapathy, Neeta Misra, Shivakumar Ganiga Channaiah, Priya Singh, Saurabh Srivastava, Sahana Shivakumar
      Pages: 303 - 312
      Abstract: Gargi Saran, Deepak Umapathy, Neeta Misra, Shivakumar Ganiga Channaiah, Priya Singh, Saurabh Srivastava, Sahana Shivakumar
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):303-312
      Background: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a most prevalent potentially malignant disorder associated with betel quid chewing frequently observed in the Indian population. The present study conducted is much of a keen interest because there is much new information, both in the press and the medical literature, about the benefits of fresh fruits and vegetables and antioxidants (such as lycopene and curcumin) for both prevention and treatment of diseases. As clinicians, we often prescribe medications with significant adverse effects, and certainly, if armed with evidence to support using such antioxidants as safer therapeutic alternatives for treatment of OSMF. Aims and Objective: The aim of the study was to compare and evaluate the efficacy of lycopene and curcumin given orally in clinically diagnosed OSMF patients. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients were divided randomly into two groups Group A and Group B. After fulfilling the eligibility criteria, sixty patients were randomly allotted based on fishbowl method into thirty each. This technique eliminated the selection bias arising in the study. Group A individuals were treated with 4 mg of lycopene and Group B individuals were given 300 mg of curcumin thrice daily for 3 months. Both the groups were assessed in terms of mouth opening and burning sensation. The statistical analysis was done using SPSS Version 16.0 statistical Analysis Software. Results: In Group A, the initial burning sensation was 65.83 ± 3.98%, and in Group B, it was 62.33 ± 5.22% (visual analog scale). After 3 months, there was complete cessation of burning sensation in both the groups. Burning sensation between the groups was statistically nonsignificant (P > 0.05). In Group A, mean mouth opening at baseline (1st visit) observed was 3.17 ± 0.08 cm which improved to 3.52 ± 0.07 cm after 3 months of the treatment period. In Group B, mean mouth opening at baseline (1st visit) observed was 3.32 ± 0.07 cm which improved to 3.52 ± 0.08 cm after 3 months of the treatment period. On comparing intergroup, the difference was statistically nonsignificant (P > 0.05). However, on comparing intergroup, average percent change in mean mouth opening from 1st visit to subsequent time intervals across the time period was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Group A showed 11.1 ± 1.0% improvement in mean mouth opening and Group B showed 6.2 ± 0.4% improvement in the mean mouth opening from the 1st visit till the posttreatment period. The change in the mean mouth opening from 1st visit till posttreatment in Group A was 0.35 ± 0.14, and in Group B, it was 0.20 ± 0.09. Conclusion: Lycopene showed better results than curcumin in improving mouth opening; both the drugs were equally effective in decreasing burning sensation in OSMF patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):303-312
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_551_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • ABO blood grouping: A potential risk factor for early childhood caries - A
           cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Lavanya Govindaraju, Ganesh Jeevanandan, E M G Subramanian
      Pages: 313 - 316
      Abstract: Lavanya Govindaraju, Ganesh Jeevanandan, E M G Subramanian
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):313-316
      Aim: The paradigm of etiology of early childhood caries (ECC) is shifting toward genetics. Of various inherited factors, blood group of an individual is genetically determined. The aim of the study is to determine if blood group of an individual will serve as a potential risk factor in the development of ECC. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Chennai. Blood samples were collected from a total of 500 children <71 months of age for determination of the blood group. Of which 96 children (24 per blood group) were randomly selected and were included in the study. Oral screening of the selected children was done by a pediatric dentist who was blinded to the blood group of the children. Decayed, extracted, and filling index was noted. Details on other associated factors for the development of ECC such as the socioeconomic status, oral hygiene measures, diet, and feeding practices were collected by directly interviewing the parents through a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square and Kruskal–Wallis test and post hoc Tukey test with significance level set at 0.05. Results: Intergroup analysis of the associated factors showed no significant differences between the children of different blood groups. A statistically significant relation was noted between the blood groups and development of ECC (P = 0.025). Conclusion: Blood group is a potential risk indicator for the development of ECC.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):313-316
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_156_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Dental caries and fluorosis among children in Lebanon

    • Authors: Mounir Doumit, Bassel Doughan
      Pages: 317 - 322
      Abstract: Mounir Doumit, Bassel Doughan
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):317-322
      Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess caries and enamel fluorosis in a sample of 1433 children aged 6–8, 12, and 15 years from 48 schools in 6 regions of Lebanon, selected by probability proportional to size. Methods: Children were examined according to the World Health Organization criteria. Results: Our results showed a mean of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) of 0.6 (dft of 5.15), 3.42, and 5.44 corresponding respectively to the groups of 6–8-, 12-, and 15-year-old children. In the same groups, the percentage of DMFT = 0 for the 6–8-year-old category was 74%, the 12-year-old category was 20.9%, and for the 15-year-old category was 9.7%; Ten (2.1%) 12 year olds had moderate and one (0.2%) severe scores; these children had been born in other countries. Conclusions: Survey results confirm the need to implement nationwide dental caries prevention measures. Since water fluoridation is not feasible, salt fluoridation would be the alternative.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):317-322
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_475_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Trends in dental caries in Indian children for the past 25 years

    • Authors: Abhishek Mehta
      Pages: 323 - 328
      Abstract: Abhishek Mehta
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):323-328
      Background: The economic liberalization which was started 25 years back in India has led to a rising gross domestic product and per capita income and a decline in poverty. There has been an improvement in various health status indicators in the Indian population. As oral health is an integral part of general health, a retrospective study was designed to assess the effect of economic liberalization on dental caries experience in Indian children. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted to find studies done on dental caries prevalence in children in India from the year 1992–2016. Mesh and free text terms “child,” “dental caries,” and “India” were searched in databases – PubMed and PubMed Central. A total of 1468 titles were screened, out of which 191 articles were shortlisted for further inspection. Finally, 69 studies were found suitable for final analysis. Results: The pooled caries prevalence was between 50.84% and 62.41% at 5-year interval. There was a decline in caries prevalence in 2–5 and 11–15 years of age group. The overall weighed mean of 2.4, 2.7, and 1.9 was observed in three different age groups. Significant caries index (SiC) of more than 3 was observed in all the age groups. Conclusion: The present review suggests that more than half of Indian children have been affected by dental caries. High SIC index score suggests a skewed distribution of caries among Indian children. This data may aid in planning further exploratory research and oral health care services for children by the stakeholders.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):323-328
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_615_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Correlation of radiovisuographic analysis of interdental and
           interradicular bone loss in furcation involvement of mandibular first
           molars: A retrospective study

    • Authors: Parichaya Batra, Sushma Das, Sarika Jain
      Pages: 329 - 332
      Abstract: Parichaya Batra, Sushma Das, Sarika Jain
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):329-332
      Background and Objectives: The presence of furcation involvement represents a formidable problem in the treatment of periodontal disease. Advances in radiographic analysis such as radiovisuographic (RVG) aid in the early diagnosis and treatment planning, which is critical for long-term success. The present investigation aims to correlate the interdental and interradicular bone loss in chronic periodontitis patients so as to explore the potential of interdental bone loss as a rough approximate screening tool for early furcation diagnosis in mandibular first molar. Materials and Methods: RVG radiographs with furcation radiolucency in mandibular first molars were selected. The morphometric measurements of mesial, distal interdental bone loss, and interradicular bone loss in mandibular first molars were recorded using RVG. The correlation between mesial and distal interdental bone loss and interradicular bone loss was analyzed. Results: In this retrospective investigation, it was observed that distal interdental bone loss was not significantly different when compared with mesial interdental bone loss. The interradicular bone loss was significantly different when compared with mesial interdental bone loss, whereas on analysis between distal interdental bone loss and interradicular bone loss was also found to be statistically significant. Interpretation and Conclusion: Interdental bone loss was found to be associated with progressive bone destruction in furcation area which suggests that early detection of interdental bone loss can be helpful in predicting future interradicular bone loss.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):329-332
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_52_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Expression of vimentin and CD44 in mucoepidermoid carcinoma: A role in
           tumor growth

    • Authors: Soussan Irani, Bahar Jafari
      Pages: 333 - 340
      Abstract: Soussan Irani, Bahar Jafari
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):333-340
      Background: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may participate in angiogenesis by lining the wall of tumor vessels. Aim: The current study aimed to present the role of vimentin and CD44 in inducing vasculogenic mimicry (VM) and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in different grades of mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC). Materials and Methods: A total of 63 MEC samples were collected from the archive of Department of Pathology of Taleghani Educational Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Vimentin and CD44/periodic acid–Schiff double staining was performed. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test was used to examine the differences with categorical variables. Significance level was set at 0.05. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess the colocalization of the markers. Results: There were statistically significant differences between tumor grade and the expression levels of vimentin and CD44 (P = 0.000). Conclusion: Our results may disclose a definite relationship between microvessl density (MVD), VM, EMT, and CSCs in MEC samples. Thus, it is reasonable to suggest that CSCs are related to angiogenesis and VM.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):333-340
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_184_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Assessing the nicotine content of smoked and smokeless forms of Tobacco
           Available in Bhopal

    • Authors: HV Amith, Deepali Agrawal, Abhishek Gupta, Tarani Prakash Shrivastava, Bharathi M Purohit, Garima Bhambhani
      Pages: 341 - 346
      Abstract: HV Amith, Deepali Agrawal, Abhishek Gupta, Tarani Prakash Shrivastava, Bharathi M Purohit, Garima Bhambhani
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):341-346
      Context: Abuse of tobacco, such as drug and alcohol abuse, is a worldwide public health problem. Once a person is addicted to nicotine, quitting smoking is difficult. A measure of the addictive potential of tobacco products is the amount of nicotine available from them. The present study is an attempt to assess the nicotine content of tobacco products available in Bhopal. Aims: This study aims to assess the nicotine content of some popular brands of smoked (cigarettes and bidis) and chewed forms (pan masalas containing tobacco) of tobacco available in Bhopal. Settings and Design: This was an in vitro cross-sectional study. Subjects and Methods: Six brands of cigarettes (filtered), six brands of bidis, and six brands of chewed tobacco (pan masalas) were used for the study. The methodology published by Association of Official Analytical Chemists was followed, and reagents conforming to American Chemical Society specifications were used. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA, Bonferroni post hoc test. Results: The mean nicotine levels for cigarettes, bidis, and chewed tobacco were 7.84 ± 5.10, 16.86 ± 5.66, and 16.30 ± 3.33, respectively. The differences in the mean scores were compared using one-way ANOVA and were found to be statistically significant with F = 6.636 and P = 0.009. Bonferroni post hoc test assessed the difference in mean nicotine content among the groups indicating that the difference between cigarettes versus bidis and cigarette versus chewed tobacco was significant with P = 0.016 and 0.024, respectively. Conclusions: Bidis had the highest content of nicotine, followed by chewed tobacco (pan masalas) and cigarettes.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):341-346
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_664_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Effectiveness of nanoparticles solutions and conventional endodontic
           irrigants against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm

    • Authors: Josiane de Almeida, Bruna Casagrande Cechella, Anarela Vassen Bernardi, Andrea de Lima Pimenta, Wilson Tadeu Felippe
      Pages: 347 - 351
      Abstract: Josiane de Almeida, Bruna Casagrande Cechella, Anarela Vassen Bernardi, Andrea de Lima Pimenta, Wilson Tadeu Felippe
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):347-351
      Context: To overcome the challenge imposed by the presence of biofilm and reach significant bacterial reduction of the root canals, many irrigants have been indicated during endodontic treatment, among them nanoparticles solutions. Aims: This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of experimental solutions containing silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO Np) and conventional endodontic irrigants against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm, in root canals. Methods: Seventy-six extracted human teeth were biomechanically prepared and sterilized. The root canal surface was exposed to E. faecalis suspension to form a 7-day-old biofilm. Four teeth were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to confirm the presence of biofilm. The remaining teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 12) and treated with passive ultrasonic irrigation and different solutions: G1 – 0.85% saline (control); G2 – 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX); G3 – 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); G4 – 1% NaOCl; G5 – 1% silver nanoparticles (Ag Np) solution; and G6 – 26% ZnO Np solution. The susceptibility of E. faecalis biofilms to disinfecting solutions (n = 10) was determined by quantification of colony-forming units. SEM analysis was also carried out to examine the biofilm structure after treatments (n = 2). Data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Dunn post hoc tests (P < 0.05). Results: All tested solutions showed superior effectiveness compared to 0.85% saline (P < 0.05). Overall, 2% CHX presented the most effective action against E. faecalis biofilm, followed by 5% NaOCl, 1% Ag Np, 26% ZnO Np, and 1% NaOCl. Conclusions: 1% Ag Np and 26% ZnO Np were effective against E. faecalis biofilm similarly to conventional endodontic irrigants.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):347-351
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_634_15
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Effect of conventional and microwave glazing on surface roughness of metal
           ceramics: An atomic force microscopy analysis

    • Authors: Akanksha Sachdeva, Nayana Prabhu, B Dhanasekar, IN Aparna
      Pages: 352 - 357
      Abstract: Akanksha Sachdeva, Nayana Prabhu, B Dhanasekar, IN Aparna
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):352-357
      Purpose: This study investigated and compared the surface roughness achieved by glazing porcelain samples in a conventional and a microwave oven. Materials and Methods: Two commercial brands of metal ceramics were used, VITA VMK MASTER and IPS CLASSIC. Sixty samples were fabricated, 30 for each type of ceramic. The samples were sintered in the conventional oven and hand-polished to remove any irregularities. Samples (n = 10) from each type of ceramic were further divided into three groups as follows: hand-polished (Group A), conventional oven glazed (Group B), and microwave glazed (Group C). Each specimen was evaluated for surface roughness by atomic force microscope. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test (a = 0.05). Results: Two-way ANOVA indicated a highly significant difference in surface roughness based on the type of glazing (P < 0.001), there was a significant difference based on the metal ceramics (P = 0.002). There was also a significant interaction between the type of glazing and metal ceramics (P = 0.009). The images obtained from the atomic force microscope corroborated the measured values. Conclusions: All the results indicate that microwave glazing can be a feasible option for glazing porcelain specimens. It was concluded that surface topography is influenced by surface treatment and microwave glazed ceramic is superior to conventional oven glazed ceramic and hand-polishing showed greater surface roughness when compared to glazing. IPS CLASSIC ceramic showed relatively smooth surface when compared to VITA VMK MASTER irrespective of the surface treatment.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):352-357
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_397_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • A systematic analysis on possibility of water fluoridation causing
           hypothyroidism

    • Authors: Nallan C S K Chaitanya, P Karunakar, Neeharika Satya Jyothi Allam, M Hima Priya, B Alekhya, Shaguftha Nauseen
      Pages: 358 - 363
      Abstract: Nallan C S K Chaitanya, P Karunakar, Neeharika Satya Jyothi Allam, M Hima Priya, B Alekhya, Shaguftha Nauseen
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):358-363
      Background: Community water fluoridation is widely used worldwide and its role in preventive dental health care is well established. However, there is sufficient evidence of the ill effects of excessive fluoride content in water, causing skeletal and dental fluorosis. Alongside, there was also extraskeletal and dental manifestations of excessive fluorides reported. They include the effect on thyroid function, but the literature regarding this is sparse. Aim: The present systematic review aims to analyze the data from controlled studies about the effect of fluoride on thyroid function. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was performed using PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, COCHRANE Library, EBSCO search, and the internet search, with language restriction to English. The search included published studies which dealt with the association of fluorine with hypothyroidism, from January 1981 to November 2015. Literature search was done using keywords: fluoride and hypothyroidism, dental fluorosis and thyroid disorders, systemic fluorosis and thyroid disease, excessive water fluoridation and hypothyroidism, thyroid and fluoride, fluorosis and its adverse effects. Results: Out of 166 publications, related to search strategy, 37 full articles which were related with the association of fluoride and hypothyroidism were acquired for further inspection. Out of the 37 articles, 10 articles met the inclusion criteria. The data were extracted and placed in an excel sheet and were analyzed. The analysis suggested a positive correlation of excess fluoride and hypothyroidism. Conclusion: The present systematic review suggests a positive correlation between excess fluoride and hypothyroidism. This calls the need for further well-controlled studies in this otherwise emerging alarming issue. It also calls for considerable community network through health informatics for problem sensitization.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):358-363
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_505_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Utility of facebow in the fabrication of complete dentures, occlusal
           splints and full arch fixed dental prostheses: A systematic review

    • Authors: Farhan Raza Khan, Rabia Ali, Aiman Sheikh
      Pages: 364 - 369
      Abstract: Farhan Raza Khan, Rabia Ali, Aiman Sheikh
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):364-369
      Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the utility of facebow transfer in the fabrication of occlusal splints, complete dentures and full arch fixed dental prosthesis. Materials and Methods: A systematic review protocol was registered at PROSPERO registry, University of York, UK (CRD42016041919). Following databases were explored: PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of knowledge. The PICO model included participants who received occlusal splint or complete denture or full arch fixed dental prosthesis at the centric relation position. The intervention was the use of facebow transfer. Comparators were prosthesis made without using a facebow. Outcomes were the patient satisfaction of the prosthesis and the need for laboratory adjustments. Only randomized clinical trials were included in the present review. A customized data extraction pro forma was used to extract the data and assess its quality. Results: A total of 505 articles were retrieved. On excluding duplicates, protocols, case reports, case series, narrative reviews, etc., only eight studies were selected for review. Six clinical trials on 249 complete dentures and two clinical trials on 65 occlusal splints were reviewed. No study on full arch crown and bridge work satisfied the inclusion criteria. Conclusions: The use of facebow did not yield a superior fit or comfort of the complete dentures or occlusal splints. Therefore, there is no evidence of the utility facebow transfer for these prostheses. However, no inference could be drawn for its utility in full arch fixed dental prosthesis as there were no studies to draw an inference.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):364-369
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_377_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Begg&#39;s mechanotherapy: Revisited!!!!!!!!!!

    • Authors: Sumita Mishra
      Pages: 370 - 373
      Abstract: Sumita Mishra
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):370-373
      The Begg's light wire technique is a simple technique that is capable of producing good results with minimum efforts. It is an easy technique requiring a simplistic diagnosis and stereotype treatment. However, it lost popularity due to its projection as a “cook book” treatment and an overemphasis on extractions, based on theory of attritional occlusion. Here, a review is presented on various cases treated with Begg's mechanotherapy encompassing its advantages and disadvantages.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):370-373
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_515_15
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Burden of dental diseases in India as compared to South Asia: An insight

    • Authors: SM Balaji
      Pages: 374 - 377
      Abstract: SM Balaji
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):374-377
      Introduction: In the recent past, the level of prevalence and incidence of dental caries and periodontal diseases in India and its comparison with South-Asian neighbors have not been reported. The manuscript estimates the same using the global disease burden 2016 approach. Materials and Methods: Secondary data analysis of primary data presented by Vos et al., 2016, was used for this study. Data from the global burden of disease, data at https://vizhub.healthdata.org/gbd-compare/and http://ghdx.healthdata.org/gbd-results-tool, and data for permanent dental caries, periodontal diseases, and overall dental disorders for both genders (age standardized) at prevalence, incidence, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were obtained for India and South Asian region and compared qualitatively. Results: For every 100,000 Indians, as compared to South Asian males (30,903 in every 100,000), Indian males (31,489) had prevalence of dental caries. Among females, the same was 33,926 for South Asians and 34,426 for Indians. Similarly, the 2016 incidence of dental caries was higher among Indians as compared to South Asians and more females suffered from dental caries than males, whereas a reversal of gender trend was observed with periodontal disease. Overall dental disorder burden from 1990 to 2016 is presented. Conclusion: There is a difference between genders in the prevalence, incidence, and DALYs of caries of permanent dentition and that of periodontal diseases. As compared to South Asia, India has more burden of dental diseases. Indian dental workforce and oral health policy need to be realigned to counter the burden of oral disorders.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):374-377
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_333_18
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Assessment of oral health status and associated lifestyle factors among
           Malaysian Fishermen in Teluk Bahang, Penang: An analytical cross-sectional
           study

    • Authors: Manjit Kaur Doola Singh, Surajudeen Abiola Abdulrahman, Abdul Rashid
      Pages: 378 - 390
      Abstract: Manjit Kaur Doola Singh, Surajudeen Abiola Abdulrahman, Abdul Rashid
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):378-390
      Background: Given background sparsity of country-specific literature evidence, and the pervasive unhealthy lifestyle habits such as tobacco, alcohol use, and high sugar consumption among fishermen, the aim of this study was to assess the oral health status and associated lifestyle factors among Malaysian fishermen in Teluk Bahang, Penang. Subjects and Methods: In an analytical cross-sectional design, we used simple random sampling technique to select 242 multiracial Malaysian male fishermen aged between 18 and 75 years from five fishing villages located at Gurney Drive, Tanjong Tokong, Tanjong Bungah, Batu Ferringhi, and Teluk Bahang to participate in this study. During four consecutive weekends in January 2017, we conducted face-to-face interviews with participants using a pre-validated, interviewer-administered WHO oral health questionnaire. We categorized participants as having “good” or “poor” oral health based on a mean cutoff score of 14. Multivariate regression models were fitted to assess the oral health status and associated lifestyle factors among the study population, using SPSS version 22. Results: We achieved a response rate of 97.6%. Overall, the prevalence of poor oral health in this study was 47.5%. “Income” (RM/month), “type of fishing,” “additional occupation,” “age” (years), “frequency of pies, buns consumed,” and “frequency of sweets, soft drinks consumed” were significant predictors of oral health status among the fishermen. Conclusion: Poor oral health is relatively highly prevalent among the fishermen in our study. The oral health status of fishermen in Teluk Bahang was consistent with the national average and significantly associated with their sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. Targeted interventions are required to arrest and reverse this trend.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):378-390
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_545_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Treatment of class II malocclusion and unerupted upper canines with
           self-ligating appliance

    • Authors: Rita Catia Br&#225;s Bariani, Carlos Henrique Guimar&#227;es, Wilana Silva Moura, Cristina Lucia Feij&#243; Ortolani, Jos&#223; Fernando Castanha Henriques, Silvio Augusto Pereira-Bellini
      Pages: 391 - 395
      Abstract: Rita Catia Brás Bariani, Carlos Henrique Guimarães, Wilana Silva Moura, Cristina Lucia Feijó Ortolani, Josß Fernando Castanha Henriques, Silvio Augusto Pereira-Bellini
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):391-395
      Treatments without tooth extractions have become more popular over the last two decades. In this context, expansion of the maxillary arch is an interesting treatment option for cases in which space is required and other factors not favoring extractions (such as the facial profile) are present. According to several authors, this posterior expansion can be obtained using a system comprising self-ligating brackets and superelastic nickel-titanium arches. The present article aims to report a case of a young patient with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion, with impacted upper canines and significant arch length-tooth discrepancy. Methods: The case was treated by means of a passive self-ligating appliance in association with Class II elastics and coil spring for distalizing the molars. This treatment alternative was effective for correcting Class II and obtaining space to correct tooth positioning.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):391-395
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_231_15
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Cystadenocarcinoma of the mandible

    • Authors: Jinisha Madathil, Nileena R Kumar, P Shiny
      Pages: 396 - 399
      Abstract: Jinisha Madathil, Nileena R Kumar, P Shiny
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):396-399
      Papillary cystadenocarcinoma of the salivary gland is a rare malignant tumor and occurs in major and minor salivary glands. Papillary cystadenocarcinoma of the mandible is exceptionally rare. It is usually a low-grade destructive tumor with a papillary and cystic architecture. This case describes a unique presentation, location, and radiographic appearance of this lesion.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(3):396-399
      PubDate: Wed,13 Jun 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_768_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)
       
 
 
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