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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Cancer
  [SJR: 0.318]   [H-I: 26]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0019-509X
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • From the new editors.....

    • Pages: 393 - 393
      Abstract:
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):393-393

      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):393-393
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/0019-509X.225831
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for unresectable oral cancers: Optimizing
           outcomes?

    • Authors: T Puri
      Pages: 394 - 396
      Abstract: T Puri
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):394-396

      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):394-396
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_257_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Clinico-pathological profile of colorectal cancer in first two decades of
           life: A retrospective analysis from tertiary health center

    • Authors: D Sharma, G Singh
      Pages: 397 - 400
      Abstract: D Sharma, G Singh
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):397-400
      AIM: This retrospective observational study was done to analyze age, gender, site of primary tumor and histological characterstics in patients of colorectal carcinoma in the first two decades of life. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A total of 373 patients of colorectal patients were registered in the Department of Radiation Oncology from January 2010 to December 2015. Patients who were <20 years of age were analyzed for clinicopathological characteristic. RESULTS: In our study, a total of 29 out of 373 patients (7.75%) were ≤20 years. Male to female distribution was 2.2:1. Younger age group presented with advanced Stage III and IV 58.62% and 10.34% patients, respectively. Only 9 (30.5%) patients were of Stage I and II. The most common involved site was rectum in 21 (72.41%) patients, followed by rectosigmoid involvement in 5 (17.24%). CONCLUSIONS: Colorectal carcinoma in young adults is usually locally advanced or metastatic. Therefore, the diagnosis of CRC should be done at early and curable stage. Bleeding per rectum in a younger age group should not be ignored but must be properly evaluated.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):397-400
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_225_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Histopathologic review of 400 biopsies and resection specimens of trunk
           and extremity-based soft tissue tumors

    • Authors: R Badanale, B Rekhi, NA Jambhekar, A Gulia, J Bajpai, S Laskar, N Khanna, G Chinnaswamy, A Puri
      Pages: 401 - 408
      Abstract: R Badanale, B Rekhi, NA Jambhekar, A Gulia, J Bajpai, S Laskar, N Khanna, G Chinnaswamy, A Puri
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):401-408
      AIMS: To review various pathologic parameters in diagnosed cases of trunk and extremity-based soft tissue tumors (STTs), in order to identify concordance rate between initial biopsy and resection specimen and discrepancies between initial and review diagnosis, by a specialist pathologist. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a 2-year-period, 400 retrospectively diagnosed STTs (553 specimens) including referral and “in-house” cases were studied. The reviewing specialist pathologist was blinded to the initial diagnoses. Discordances including discrepancies and deficiencies were defined as major and minor. Major discrepancies included those that could lead to significant treatment changes. True discrepancies were those related to sampling issues between the biopsies and resection specimens. Deficiencies relating to tumor subtyping, sarcoma grading, documentation of tumor size, and marginal status (in resections) were subdivided as major and minor. RESULTS: Most cases (328, 82%) were sarcomas (most common, synovial sarcoma; most common Stage, III), followed by benign tumors (36, 9%) (most common, schwannoma) and intermediate malignancies (32, 8%) (most common, fibromatosis). Within STTs, liposarcomas, neural tumors, and undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas were relatively more frequently associated with discrepancies. Percentage of cases with major discordances between the referral reports (100 cases) and review diagnosis was 60%. Percentage of cases with major discordances between the specialist and other oncopathologists was 11%. True discrepancies were observed in 20 (5%) cases. The association of type of specimen with the rate of discordance was not significant (P = 0.114). CONCLUSIONS: Diagnoses of STTs are fraught with errors mostly from general pathologists, followed by nonspecialist oncopathologists. These findings reinforce the need for reporting of STTs, especially sarcomas, by specialist pathologists.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):401-408
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_259_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Reirradiation for recurrent primary central nervous system tumors:
           Eight-year audit from a tertiary cancer care center in South India

    • Authors: D Menon, PG Chelakkot
      Pages: 409 - 414
      Abstract: D Menon, PG Chelakkot
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):409-414
      BACKGROUND: Radiation therapy is a major treatment option in the management of primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors, though recurrences after primary treatment, especially in high-grade glial tumors, is a challenge for treating physician. Advances in the field of radiation have made reirradiation a feasible option in recurrent CNS tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Details of patients with primary CNS lesions who presented between 2009 and 2016, with recurrent CNS lesions, and who were treated with reirradiation were retrieved from electronic medical records, as a departmental audit, and the outcome was analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 33 patients received reirradiation. Median follow-up was 112.7 months. Median age at presentation was 36 years. On completing initial treatment, 42.4% had no residual disease. Median time to symptomatic recurrence was 51.33 months. For reirradiation, stereotactic radiotherapy was used in 27.3%, stereotactic radiosurgery in 12.1%, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy in 36.4%. Mean cumulative 2 Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 111.00 ± 15.287 Gy. At the last follow-up, 57.6% of patients were alive, and 27.3% had succumbed to the disease. Median OS was 187.67 months. Three-year survival after reirradiation was 74.1%. CONCLUSION: Our study is probably one of the first from the Indian subcontinent analyzing a series of reirradiation in primary CNS tumors. Our survival subsequent to reirradiation is comparable to that in available literature; which are also mostly retrospective. Our analysis also substantiates that younger patients, longer intervals between the two sets of radiation and biologically effective dose <100 Gy and EQD2Cumulativeof <100 Gy are factors that favorably improve the survival after reirradiation as has been shown in literature.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):409-414
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_216_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Retrospective analysis of patients with relapsed or refractory testicular
           nonseminous germ cell tumors treated with autologous stem cell
           transplantation

    • Authors: F Yilmaz, N Soyer, R Uslu, AP Erdogan, B Karaca, G Saydam, F Sahin, F Vural
      Pages: 415 - 420
      Abstract: F Yilmaz, N Soyer, R Uslu, AP Erdogan, B Karaca, G Saydam, F Sahin, F Vural
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):415-420
      BACKGROUND AND AIM: About 20-25% of the testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are relapsed or refractory after first line therapy and optimal treatment for this group is poorly defined. We aimed to analyze the efficacy and safety of autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in this patient group.Material and METHODS: 19 patients with 28 ASCT were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients were treated with BEP (Bleomycin, etoposide, cisplatin) as first line therapy and TIP(paclitexalifosfamide, cisplatin) was given as salvage chemotherapy. Stem cell collection was performed with TIP and granulocyte stimulating factor. ASCT was performed with carboplatin(700mg/m2) and etoposite(750mg /m 2). The results were provided as median(min-max). P<0.05 was accepted as statistical significant level. RESULTS: After ASCT, complete(CR) and partial remission (PR) rates were 47.3% and 31 .5% respectively. The median overall survival(OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were 18(0-37.4 months) and 7(0-15months) months respectively. Estimated 2-year OS was 47.4% and PFS was 35.3%. Grade 3/4 toxicities including diarrhea, mucositis, and toxic hepatitis were observed in 5 patients. Only one patient died due to complication of transplantation. CONCLUSION: Although the number of the patients in this study is limited, ASCT seems to be a safe and effective treatment modality in relapsed refractory non-seminomatousTGCT with an acceptable OS, PFS and mortality rates.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):415-420
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_284_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Utilization of pelvic lymph node dissection in patients undergoing
           robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in India versus the United States
           – A Vattikuti Collective Quality Initiative database analysis

    • Authors: F Abdollah, S Arora, T Jindal, P Gild, A Sood, TB Yuvaraja, RK Ahlawat, NP Gupta, M Bhandari, M Menon
      Pages: 421 - 425
      Abstract: F Abdollah, S Arora, T Jindal, P Gild, A Sood, TB Yuvaraja, RK Ahlawat, NP Gupta, M Bhandari, M Menon
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):421-425
      BACKGROUND: The utilization and extent of pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) varies depending on the disease and practice patterns. AIMS: This study compares practice patterns in utilization of PLND between Indian and United States (US) practices. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: We focused on 415 patients (204 India; 211 US) prostate cancer patients treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, between 2015 and 2016, within the Vattikuti Collective Quality Initiative database. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Utilization of PLND and number of nodes removed were evaluated for the entire cohort, and after stratifying for Country of treatment and D'Amico risk groups. Logistic regression tested the relationship between PLND and country of treatment, after adjusting for disease risk. RESULTS: Indian patients had a higher risk distribution (D'Amico high-risk 53.4% in India vs. 27% in the US; P< 0.001) compared to their US counterparts. Overall, 193/204 (94.6%) Indian patients underwent PLND versus 181/211 (85.8%) US patients (P = 0.003). When stratified based on disease risk, PLND was performed more frequently in Indian patients with low-risk disease (81.0% vs. 41.4%,P= 0.008), but not in those with intermediate and high-risk disease. On multivariable analysis, Indian patients had a 2.57-fold higher probability of undergoing PLND than their US counterparts (P = 0.02). The analysis of the number of lymph nodes removed showed similar trends. CONCLUSIONS: Indian patients are more likely to undergo PLND than US patients. This is, especially true for patients with low-risk disease, who are unlikely to benefit from this procedure. Efforts should focus on optimizing the utilization of PLND, and deliver it only when there is clinical indication.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):421-425
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_227_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Microsatellite Instability in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia using D17S261 and
           D3S643 markers: A Pilot Study in Gujarat Population

    • Authors: TN Patel, M Chakraborty, P Bhattacharya
      Pages: 426 - 429
      Abstract: TN Patel, M Chakraborty, P Bhattacharya
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):426-429
      CONTEXT: Tumor progresses through a series of genetic alterations that involve proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes – the gatekeeper, caretakers, and landscaper genes. Microsatellites are short tandem repeat sequences, present over the span of human genome and are known to be variable at multiple loci due to errors in DNA Mismatch Repair machinery. AIM: The present study was aimed to evaluate the association between Microsatellite Instability (MSI) and evolution of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) – genetically a rare event but profound in this pilot study. SETTINGS AND DESIGNS: We explore the possibility of MSI in primary CML patients confirmed by t(9;22) using capillary electrophoresis. Fifteen CML patients and healthy individual samples, respectively, were used to study the markers D17S261 and D3S643. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The DNA was amplified using tagged and nontagged primers and further subjected to bioanalysis and fragment analysis. RESULTS: While the results from bioanalyzer fluctuated, fragment analysis indicated the presence of microsatellite variability in 80% of the patients' samples as compared to no MSI in normal individuals for both the markers. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that MSI is a genetic event that may have a role in CML progression or evolution. Further studies are warranted to understand the plausible underlying causes.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):426-429
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_275_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Long-term outcome of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Impact of biosimilar
           rituximab and radiation

    • Authors: P Ganesan, TG Sagar, K Kannan, V Radhakrishnan, S Rajaraman, A John, S Sundersingh, V Mahajan, TS Ganesan
      Pages: 430 - 435
      Abstract: P Ganesan, TG Sagar, K Kannan, V Radhakrishnan, S Rajaraman, A John, S Sundersingh, V Mahajan, TS Ganesan
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):430-435
      INTRODUCTION: Rituximab (R)-CHOP improves survival over CHOP in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The availability of biosimilar rituximab in India has increased access of this drug. We report on the impact of treatment on outcomes with special emphasis on the impact of biosimilar rituximab and radiation. METHODS: Outcomes of adults (age 15–60 years) treated with CHOP+/- Rituximab radiation were analyzed retrospectively to look at baseline features, treatment, and event-free and overall survival (EFS and OS). RESULTS: In the period 2000–2013, 444 patients (median age 47 years: 15–60; males: 288 [65%]; Stage III/IV: 224 [50%]; age-adjusted international prognostic index [aaIPI] Score 2 or 3 in 50%) received either CHOP (n = 325 [73%]) or RCHOP (n = 119 [27%]) therapy. Biosimilar rituximab and the original were used in 95 (80%) and 24 (20%) patients, respectively. Radiation was given in 134 (30%) patients (Stages I and II, 100/220 [45%] and Stages III and IV, 34/224 [15%]). After a median follow-up of 46 (0.2–126) months, the 5-year EFS and OS were 59% and 68%, respectively. The factors predicting inferior EFS and OS were age >40 years, performance status 2–4, Stage III/IV, hemoglobin <12 g/dL, the aaIPI Score 2 or 3, and nonuse of rituximab and radiation. Radiation used in early stage disease benefitted all subgroups regardless of bulky disease, use of rituximab, or the number of cycles of chemotherapy. Addition of rituximab improved survival across all categories of aaIPI. CONCLUSION: Availability of biosimilar rituximab has increased access and survival of patients with DLBCL in India. Radiotherapy improved outcomes in early stages.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):430-435
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_241_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • ROS1 rearranged nonsmall cell lung cancer and crizotinib: An Indian
           experience

    • Authors: V Noronha, MV Chandrakanth, AP Joshi, V Patil, A Chougule, A Mahajan, AK Janu, R Chanana, K Prabhash
      Pages: 436 - 438
      Abstract: V Noronha, MV Chandrakanth, AP Joshi, V Patil, A Chougule, A Mahajan, AK Janu, R Chanana, K Prabhash
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):436-438
      ROS1 rearrangement acts as a driver mutation in 1-2% of NSCLC. Crizotinib is approved in this situation both in treatment naïve and pre-treated patients. Here we report our experience with crizotinib in patients with advanced NSCLC harbouring ROS1 rearrangement. Eleven patients were included in our study. More than half of our patients had associated comorbidities and one fourth of them had a compromised performance status. Out of 11 patients, 5 of them were exposed to crizotinib .The response rates among crizotinib treated patients was 80%. With a median follow up of 9 months, median PFS and OS were 5.4 months and 8.5 months respectively for the entire population. Analyzing the outcomes separately , median PFS and OS was not reached for those who received crizotinib compared to median PFS of 2.5 months and median OS of 4.2 months in those who were not exposed to crizotinib. The difference was statistically significant. Estimated 1 year OS was 80% for those who received crizotinib compared to 18% for who did not receive crizotinib. In conclusion, crizotinib is effective with acceptable side effect profile in patients with ROS1 rearranged NSCLC in our population.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):436-438
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_269_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Perioperative complications of esophagectomy: Postneoadjuvant treatment
           versus primary surgery – Our experience and review of literature

    • Authors: AS Patil, NV Gulavani, NP Dharmadhikari, KC Polavarapu, SS Sharma, RC Mistry
      Pages: 439 - 441
      Abstract: AS Patil, NV Gulavani, NP Dharmadhikari, KC Polavarapu, SS Sharma, RC Mistry
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):439-441
      AIMS: To compare perioperative complications in esophagectomy after neoadjuvant therapy v/s primary surgery. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of perioperative complications in a prospectively maintained data base of patients who underwent esophagectomy as Primary surgery or after neoadjuvant therapy was done. METHODS AND MATERIAL: 238 cases of esophagectomies performed for esophageal carcinoma were analysed and compared, out of which 125(52.5%) were given neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery and 113(47.5%) underwent primary surgery. Surgical procedure was standard for both the groups. All the cases were analysed for perioperative complications. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Data was analysed using Open Epi soft ware. Association between the two study group was assessed with Chi square test. RESULTS: On comparison, both the groups were comparable in demographic profile and type of surgery performed. However, tumour stage was higher for cases who received neoadjuvant therapy as expected. On analysis there was no significant difference in overall morbidity and 30 days mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Neoadjuvant Chemo/chemoradiotherapy is a feasible option in esophageal carcinoma without increase in incidence of peri operative morbidity or mortality.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):439-441
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_228_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Paralingual and sublingual space invasion in magnetic resonance imaging of
           squamous cell carcinoma of anterior two-thirds of tongue: Is there a
           prognostic significance? A prospective evaluation

    • Authors: SC Jayasankaran, PG Chelakkot, K Thankappan, S Iyer, S Moorthy
      Pages: 442 - 446
      Abstract: SC Jayasankaran, PG Chelakkot, K Thankappan, S Iyer, S Moorthy
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):442-446
      BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in tumors of anterior two-thirds of tongue has a significant role in assessing different tumor parameters, and in prognosticating. AIM: This prospective study conducted in a tertiary cancer care center, focused on patients with squamous cell carcinoma of anterior two-thirds of tongue. The significance of invasion of paralingual and sublingual spaces in relation to the pathological grade of these tumors, and its predictive value in pathological nodal involvement were analyzed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All consecutive patients with the required inclusion criteria were accrued. Imaging was done with 3 Tesla MRI and invasion of sublingual and paralingual spaces were accurately assessed. Data elucidated were tabulated and analysed using IBM SPSS version 20.0. Chi-square test, nonparametric correlation using Spearman's Rho correlation, and two-independent sample test using Mann–Whitney's U-test were used to arrive at correlations between the imaging and histopathological parameters. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients were analyzed. Mean age was 52.3 ± 11.45 years. 74.6% were males. MRI showed sublingual space invasion in 47.6%. 18/28 with and 11/33 without invasion had node positivity. Paralingual space involvement was observed in 31.7% of patients. Thirteen of these and 16/43 with no involvement had positive cervical nodes. No statistically significant correlation was observed. CONCLUSION: This prospective study did not establish any statistically sound correlation, and robust data are lacking to support newer parameters such as sublingual space and paralingual space as probable predictors of cervical nodal involvement, and for prognostication.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):442-446
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_318_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Quality of life outcome measures using University of Washington
           questionnaire version 4 in early T1/T2 anterior tongue cancers with and
           without radiotherapy: A cross-sectional study

    • Authors: P Sakthivel, DV K Irugu, CA Singh, H Verma, R Yogal, B Jat, A Chadran, K Sikka, A Thakar, SC Sharma
      Pages: 447 - 452
      Abstract: P Sakthivel, DV K Irugu, CA Singh, H Verma, R Yogal, B Jat, A Chadran, K Sikka, A Thakar, SC Sharma
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):447-452
      CONTEXT: To evaluate the quality of life (QOL) outcome measures in disease-free survivors of pathological T1/T2 tongue cancers and to compare QOL in patients treated with only surgery and with adjuvant treatment. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All pathological T1/T2 anterior tongue cancer cases with follow-up from January 2011 till December 2015, who had locoregionally controlled disease with a minimum disease-free survival period of 1 year, were included in the study. RESULTS: A total of 36 patients, 28 are males and 8 are females with an age range of 24–66 years (median age of 43) were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into two groups with (n = 26) and without adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy (RT) (n = 10) and the University of Washington-QOL questionnaire version 4 for physical and social domains, global questions and three important domains were analyzed. On the physical and social domain scores, the surgery-alone group outscored the combined modality group on all scales and the differences were statistically significant for specific physical domains such as saliva (0.0001), taste (P = 0.0001), chewing (P = 0.0004), swallowing (P = 0.0026), and social domains such as mood (0.0001), pain (P = 0.0001), and shoulder function (P = 0.0061). The overall global QOL scores were also better for the surgical group compared with group which received adjuvant RT but was not statistically significant. All patients chose saliva as their top priority domain in the group which received radiation, and 60% chose “swallowing ability” as the preferred top priority domain in the only surgical group. CONCLUSIONS: Although locoregional control and disease-free survival are the major treatment-related endpoints for cancer management, QOL outcome measures have to assess to determine the impact of a treatment modality on patients well-being and for better rehabilitation of cancer-free patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):447-452
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_236_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Carboplatin-based concurrent chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced
           head and neck cancer patients who are unfit for cisplatin therapy

    • Authors: V Noronha, V Sharma, A Joshi, VM Patil, SG Laskar, K Prabhash
      Pages: 453 - 457
      Abstract: V Noronha, V Sharma, A Joshi, VM Patil, SG Laskar, K Prabhash
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):453-457
      BACKGROUND: Cisplatin-based chemoradiation (CTRT) is the standard of care in locally advanced head and neck cancers. Limited treatment options are available in patients unfit for cisplatin. AIMS: This audit was carried out to study the toxicities, tolerance, and outcomes of carboplatin-based CTRT in patients who are not eligible for cisplatin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 63 locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated between January 2011 and October 2015 were administered carboplatin-based CTRT. The dose of carboplatin was equivalent to area under the curve equivalent to 2 administered once a week for a maximum of 7 cycles. Toxicity was coded as per the CTCAE version 4.03. SPSS software version 16 was used for statistical analysis. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Descriptive statistics was performed. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan–Meier survival analysis. Cox proportional hazard model was used for identifying factors affecting PFS and OS. RESULTS: The reasons for patients being unfit for cisplatin were low serum creatinine clearance in 41 (65.07%), sensorineural hearing loss in 18 (28.57%), uncontrolled medical comorbidities in 3 (4.76%), and old age in 1 patient (1.6%). 53 patients (84.1%) completed planned radiotherapy. The median number of chemotherapy cycles administered was 6. Grade 3–4 toxicities were seen in 32 patients (50.8%). The median OS and PFS were 28 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.9–34.6 months) and 17 months (95% CI: 08.2–25.7 months), respectively. Age was the only factor significantly affecting OS and PFS. CONCLUSION: Carboplatin-based CTRT is well tolerated in patients unfit for cisplatin and seems to have superior outcomes than those reported in radical radiotherapy studies.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):453-457
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_320_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Barriers affecting adherence to radiation treatment and strategies to
           overcome those barriers

    • Authors: R Rangarajan, K Jayaraman
      Pages: 458 - 460
      Abstract: R Rangarajan, K Jayaraman
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):458-460
      BACKGROUND: The WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a patient's behavior coincides with recommendations from a health-care provider. Nonadherence to cancer treatment has a major impact on the therapeutic outcome. AIM OF THE STUDY: To assess the prevalence of nonadherence to radiation regimen and to analyze the factors that affect adherence to cancer treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients receiving radiation treatment in our hospital were screened for adherence to appointment keeping and to the prescribed radiation regimen and patients who had unplanned treatment breaks during treatment were interviewed. Between January and July 2013, we identified 61 patients who had unplanned breaks during treatment. We analyzed the social, emotional, educational, economic, and therapeutic barriers that led to nonadherence. RESULTS: Of the 61 patients who had unplanned breaks during treatment, 54% were males and 46% were females. Fifty-seven percent of patients had head and neck cancers and 25% had gynecological cancers. Seventy-one percent of patients were planned for concurrent chemoradiation. The number of days of unplanned treatment breaks ranged from 3 to 27 days. Social and therapeutic barriers were found to be the most common factor that led to nonadherence in these patients. CONCLUSION: Identification of barriers that lead to nonadherence, designing strategies to overcome such barriers and effective communication becomes imperative to ensure uninterrupted treatment. Based on the above analysis, we have designed several strategies to improve adherence to treatment among our patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):458-460
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_260_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Impact of pictorial warning labels on tobacco products among patients
           attending outpatient department of a dental college in Bangalore city: A
           cross-sectional study

    • Authors: N Vanishree, RR Narayan, N Naveen, D Bullapa, D Vignesh, NM P Raveendran
      Pages: 461 - 466
      Abstract: N Vanishree, RR Narayan, N Naveen, D Bullapa, D Vignesh, NM P Raveendran
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):461-466
      AIM: The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitude, and impact of pictorial warnings present on tobacco packets among patients attending outpatient department of a dental college of Bangalore city. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 419 patients through convenience sampling, using a structured close-ended questionnaire containing 35 questions. The participants were approached and invited to participate voluntarily. The data obtained were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test and ANOVA. RESULTS: Mean age of the participants was 28.1 ± 7.06 years. Out of total 419 participants, 62.8% were tobacco users. About 40.6% of the participants had average knowledge and only 22.9% had positive attitude regarding the pictorial warnings. Nearly 77.9% of tobacco users had previously attempted decreased frequency of tobacco use and 63.7% had tried quitting the habit. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05 Chi-square test and ANOVA). CONCLUSION: The present study revealed that most of study participants have noticed the warnings on tobacco products, and most of them believe that they could understand warning labels. This study also showed that most of study participants believed that pictorial health warnings create awareness about probable health hazards of tobacco use and that these pictorial presentations on tobacco packs positively assist in reducing or quitting tobacco smoking.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):461-466
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_203_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Role change as breadwinner in cancer caregiving

    • Authors: C Sivakumar
      Pages: 467 - 469
      Abstract: C Sivakumar
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):467-469
      INTRODUCTION: Indian families are known for adopting the role of caregiver naturally when someone in the family falls ill to cancer. Although there were strong family structure and system existed here, now the changing family pattern and structure are challenging the role of cancer caregiving as well. OBJECTIVE: This study analyses the life situation of caregivers of cancer survivors during the course of treatment and attempts to explore the areas of interventions for caregivers themselves. METHODS: A descriptive research design was adopted for the study. A sample of 40 respondents was chosen for the study through purposive sampling technique. RESULTS: Majority of the caregivers were females (75%) and fell into the age group of 35 to 45 years (65%). The education among the caregivers was varying between illiteracy to postgraduation. Majority of 95% of them adapted the dual role voluntarily and 85% of them felt that they were finding it very difficult to cope with the dual responsibility. About 60% of them felt that they would fail in their roles and were not satisfied with their performances dually. CONCLUSION: Adaptation to a dual role involves time factor and as part of care to the caregiver, a guided interaction and orientation towards managing these roles would help them better ways to adapt. Given the scarcity of support system on Indian settings, the caregivers who do dual role have huge responsibility and challenges to deliver quality caregiving and fulfill their other roles as well. It is the duty of the complete health care system to seriously take this into consideration and to act on it.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):467-469
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_211_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Statins and risk of cancer: A meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind,
           placebo-controlled trials

    • Authors: MK Kim, SK Myung, BT Tran, B Park
      Pages: 470 - 477
      Abstract: MK Kim, SK Myung, BT Tran, B Park
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):470-477
      PURPOSE: Several meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reported no association between the use of statins and the risk of cancer. However, they included open-label RCTs, which did not use placebo as a control group. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of statins on cancer risk using a meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (RDBPCTs). METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library in March 2016. Two individual authors reviewed and selected RDBPCTs based on selection criteria. RESULTS: Out of 676 retrieved articles, a total of 21 RDBPCTs with 65,196 participants (32,618 in the statin group and 32,578 in the placebo group) were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, we found that there was no significant association between the use of statins and the risk of cancer (relative risk 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.92–1.02, I2 = 0.0%) in a fixed-effect meta-analysis. In addition, in the subgroup meta-analyses, no beneficial effect of statins was observed when analyzed by statin type, country, follow-up period, methodological quality, underlying diseases/population, and type of cancer. CONCLUSIONS: The current meta-analysis of RDBPCTs found that there was no association between the use of statins and the risk of cancer.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):470-477
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_214_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Novel use of bioelectric impedence technique to detect alterations in body
           composition in advanced small cell lung cancer

    • Authors: A Mohan, R Poulose, A Ansari, K Madan, V Hadda, GC Khilnani, R Guleria
      Pages: 478 - 480
      Abstract: A Mohan, R Poulose, A Ansari, K Madan, V Hadda, GC Khilnani, R Guleria
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):478-480
      BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is frequent in lung cancer and is measured using various tools, including the novel bioelectric impedance technique for measuring body composition. However, the validation of this technique for assessing body composition in advanced small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is untested. METHODS: Forty-one treatment naïve patients (all males) and an equal number of age- and sex-matched controls were evaluated by anthropometric measurements of skinfold thicknesses and body composition parameters such as body fat%, fat mass, fat-free mass (FFM), and total body water (TBW). RESULTS: The mean (SD) age of the patient group was 55.7 (7.5) years, median pack-years was 20 (range, 0-80), and mean (SD) duration of symptoms was 152.6 (153.7) days. Median Karnofsky Performance Scale was 70 (range, 50–90). Majority of our patients (68.3%) were Stage IV followed by Stage III (31.7%). The percentage of patients with low, normal, and high body mass index (BMI) was 31.7%, 61%, and 7.3%, respectively. All components of body composition, i.e., body fat%, FFM, and TBW were significantly lower in patients compared to controls. However, the body composition in patients and controls with normal BMI was similar. The phenomenon of sarcopenia as a cause of cancer cachexia may explain these findings, whereas the combination of loss of body fat and lean body mass may lead to weight loss and reduced BMI. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that body composition is markedly altered in Indian patients with advanced SCLC. The impact of these parameters on clinically relevant outcomes needs further evaluation.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):478-480
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_497_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Knowledge, attitude, and practice toward cervical cancer among women
           attending Obstetrics and Gynecology Department: A cross-sectional,
           hospital-based survey in South India

    • Authors: G Narayana, M Jyothi Suchitra, G Sunanda, J Dasaratha Ramaiah, B Pradeep Kumar, KV Veerabhadrappa
      Pages: 481 - 487
      Abstract: G Narayana, M Jyothi Suchitra, G Sunanda, J Dasaratha Ramaiah, B Pradeep Kumar, KV Veerabhadrappa
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):481-487
      INTRODUCTION: Cervical cancer-related deaths among women in India are often due to late diagnosis of disease. Knowledge about disease and early screening is the most effective measure for cervical cancer prevention. Lack of awareness, negative attitude, and poor practice about cervical cancer and screening are the major causes to increase the incidence of disease. AIM: The study is designed to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) toward cervical cancer, screening, and prevention. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A cross-sectional, hospital-based survey was conducted in women attending Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of a secondary care referral hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 403 subjects were enrolled and subjected for interview using prevalidated KAP questionnaire on cervical cancer. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Descriptive statistics were used to represent the sociodemographic characteristics and KAP levels. Association of sociodemographic variables with KAP levels is determined using Chi-square test. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Most of (301; 74.6%) the respondents had heard about cervical cancer and majority of them are heard from media (168; 41.6%) and friends (83; 20.5%). Most women knew symptoms (259; 64.2%), risk factors (253; 62.7%), screening methods (310; 76.9%), and preventive measures (249; 61.7%) for cervical cancer. More than half of the women (252; 62.5%) having positive attitude toward screening. More than three-fourth of women (349; 86.6%) are not having practice toward cervical cancer screening. Sociodemographic characteristics are strongly associated with KAP levels. CONCLUSION: Although women are having good knowledge, positive attitude toward cervical cancer screening and prevention still there is a gap to transform it into practice. There is a need for more educational programs to connect identified knowledge slits and uplift of regular practice of cervical cancer screening.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):481-487
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_251_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Summer school in oncology - setting a benchmark in inspiring the future
           oncologists - a surgical postgraduate's perspective

    • Authors: KN Rao, MV Jagade
      Pages: 488 - 488
      Abstract: KN Rao, MV Jagade
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):488-488

      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):488-488
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_254_17
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Autobiography of a bosom

    • Authors: RF Chinoy
      Pages: 489 - 489
      Abstract: RF Chinoy
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):489-489

      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):489-489
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/0019-509X.225809
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Retraction: Histopathological analysis of meningioma and its variants: A
           study of fifty cases

    • Pages: 490 - 490
      Abstract:
      Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):490-490

      Citation: Indian Journal of Cancer 2017 54(2):490-490
      PubDate: Wed,21 Feb 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/0019-509X.225832
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2018)
       
 
 
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