JournalsTOCS API Technical Documentation

Call: user

Performs searches by email address of a registered user.
The default return is a list of journals that the user has added to his Followed Journals.
If specified, the latest articles from the user's Followed Journals are returned.

Base URL

http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/api/user

Arguments

  • Query (Required)
    • Email Address (Required)
      • Email Address of a registered user.
  • Parameters (Optional)
    • Output (Optional) Defaults to journals if ommited.
      • Either “journals” or “articles”.
        Journals returns a list of journal titles, issns, eissns and publishers.
        Articles returns a list of the latest articles.

Examples

Example Query 1

http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/api/user/l.j.rogers@hw.ac.uk?output=journals

Returns a list of journals followed by the user with the email address l.j.rogers@hw.ac.uk

Example Response 1

This method returns the standard RSS 1.0 with DC, PRISM and Content Modules: (Shortened example containing two journals).

<rdf:RDF xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
	xmlns="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/"
	xmlns:mn="http://usefulinc.com/rss/manifest/"
	xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/">
	
<channel rdf:about="http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/api/">
	<title>JournalTOCs API - journals</title>
	<link>http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/api/l.j.rogers@hw.ac.uk </link>
	<description><![CDATA[Your query: l.j.rogers@hw.ac.uk has returned 6 journals. They are listed in alphabetical order (maximum number of returned queries is 3000)]]></description>
	<dc:publisher>JournalTOCs API</dc:publisher>
	<dc:creator>webmaster <S.Chumbe@hw.ac.uk></dc:creator>
	<dc:coverage>6</dc:coverage>
	<image rdf:resource="http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/images/xtralogo.gif" />
	<items>
		<rdf:Seq>
			<rdf:li rdf:resource="http://www.actapress.com/rss.aspx?journal=97" />
			<rdf:li rdf:resource="http://www.informaworld.com/ampp/rss~content=0968-7769" />	
		</rdf:Seq>
	</items>
</channel>
	
<item rdf:about="http://www.actapress.com/rss.aspx?journal=97">
	<link>http://www.actapress.com/rss.aspx?journal=97</link>
	<title>Advanced Technology for Learning</title>
	<description><![CDATA[<br>
	Journal HomePage: http://www.actapress.com/Content_of_Journal.aspx?JournalID=97<br>
	Journal TOC RSS feeds: http://www.actapress.com/rss.aspx?journal=97<br>
	printISSN: 1710-2251<br>
	eISSN: <br>
	journaltocID: 293<br>
	Publisher: ACTA Press]]></description>
</item>
	
<item rdf:about="http://www.informaworld.com/ampp/rss~content=0968-7769">
	<link>http://www.informaworld.com/ampp/rss~content=0968-7769</link>
	<title>ALT-J: Research in Learning Technology</title>
	<description><![CDATA[<br>
	Journal HomePage: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=journal&issn=0968-7769<br>
	Journal TOC RSS feeds: http://www.informaworld.com/ampp/rss~content=0968-7769<br>
	printISSN: 0968-7769<br>
	eISSN: 1741-1629<br>
	journaltocID: 14546<br>
	Publisher: Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)]]></description>
</item>
	
<rdf:Description rdf:ID="manifest">
	<mn:channels>
		<rdf:Seq>
			<rdf:li rdf:resource="http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/api/" />
		</rdf:Seq>
	</mn:channels>
</rdf:Description>
	
</rdf:RDF>		

Example Query 2

http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/api/user/l.j.rogers@hw.ac.uk?output=articles

Returns a list of the latest articles published in the journals followed by the user with the email address l.j.rogers@hw.ac.uk

Example Response 2

This method returns the standard RSS 1.0 with DC, PRISM and Content Modules: (Shortened example containing two articles).

<rdf:RDF xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#" 
	xmlns:prism="http://prismstandard.org/namespaces/1.2/basic/" 
	xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/" 
	xmlns:mn="http://usefulinc.com/rss/manifest/"
	xmlns:content="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/content/" 
	xmlns="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/">
	
<channel rdf:about="http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/api/">
	<title>JournalTOCs API - Found 5 journals for: l.j.rogers@hw.ac.uk (71 articles)</title>
	<link>http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/api/l.j.rogers@hw.ac.uk </link>
	<description><![CDATA[Your query: l.j.rogers@hw.ac.uk has returned 71 articles. They are listed in alphabetical order per journal (maximum number of returned items is 3000)]]> </description>
	<dc:publisher>JournalTOCs API</dc:publisher>
	<dc:creator>JOURNALTOCS API PROJECT</dc:creator>
	<dc:coverage>5</dc:coverage>
	<image rdf:resource="http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/images/xtralogo.gif" />
	<items>
		<rdf:Seq>
	
		</rdf:Seq>
	</items>
</channel>

<item rdf:about="http://www.actapress.com/PaperInfo.aspx?PaperID=34670">
	<title>(Volume 5 / 2008 - Issue: 1) 208-0925 - SPATIAL SKILLS AND NAVIGATION OF HYPERTEXT IN CHILDREN AND ADULTS</title>
	<link>http://www.actapress.com/PaperInfo.aspx?PaperID=34670</link>
	<description>Hypertext, spatial skills, cognitive maps, children</description>
	<dc:identifier>http://www.actapress.com/PaperInfo.aspx?PaperID=34670</dc:identifier>
	<dc:date>Mon, 02 Feb 2009 16:39:58 GMT</dc:date>
	<dc:source>Advanced Technology for Learning, Vol. , No.  (2009) pp.  - </dc:source>
	<dc:publisher>ACTA Press</dc:publisher>
	<prism:PublicationName>Advanced Technology for Learning</prism:PublicationName>
	<prism:publicationDate>Mon, 02 Feb 2009 16:39:58 GMT</prism:publicationDate>
	<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><a href="http://www.actapress.com/PaperInfo.aspx?PaperID=34670"><b>(Volume 5 / 2008 - Issue: 1) 208-0925 - SPATIAL SKILLS AND NAVIGATION OF HYPERTEXT IN CHILDREN AND ADULTS</b></A><br /> <br /><i>Advanced Technology for Learning, Vol. , No.  (2009) pp.  - </i><br />Hypertext, spatial skills, cognitive maps, children</p>]]></content:encoded>
</item>

<item rdf:about="http://dx.doi.org/10.1504/IJLT.2009.028807">
	<title>Modelling affect expression and recognition in an interactive learning environment</title>
	<link>http://www.inderscience.com/link.php?id=28807</link>
	<description>Affective reasoning holds significant potential for intelligent tutoring systems. Incorporating affective reasoning into pedagogical decision-making capabilities could enable learning environments to create customised experiences that are dynamically tailored to individual students' ever-changing levels of engagement, interest, motivation and self-efficacy. Because physiological responses are directly triggered by changes in affect, biofeedback data such as heart rate and galvanic skin response can be used to infer affective changes in conjunction with the situational context. This article explores an approach to inducing affect models for a learning environment. The inductive approach is examined for the task of modelling students' self-efficacy and empathy for companion agents. Together, these studies on affect in a narrative learning environment suggest that it is possible to build models of affective constructs from observations of the situational context and students' physiological response.</description>
	<dc:identifier>DOI 10.1504/IJLT.2009.028807</dc:identifier>
	<dc:creator>Scott W. McQuiggan, James C. Lester</dc:creator>
	<dc:subject>affective student modelling; self-efficacy; intelligent tutoring systems; ITS; inductive learning; human-computer interaction; HCI; student affect; interactive learning; affect expression; affect recognition; empathy; situational context; phy</dc:subject>
	<dc:date>2009-10-03T23:20:50-05:00</dc:date>
	<dc:source>International Journal of Learning Technology, Vol. 4, No. 3/4 (2009) pp. 216 - 233
	</dc:source>
	<dc:publisher>Inderscience Publishers</dc:publisher>
	<prism:PublicationName>International Journal of Learning Technology</prism:PublicationName>
	<prism:volume>4</prism:volume>
	<prism:number>3/4</prism:number>
	<prism:startingPage>216</prism:startingPage>
	<prism:endingPage>233</prism:endingPage>
	<prism:publicationDate>2009-10-03T23:20:50-05:00</prism:publicationDate>
	<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p><a href="http://www.inderscience.com/link.php?id=28807"><b>Modelling affect expression and recognition in an interactive learning environment</b></A><br />Scott W. McQuiggan, James C. Lester <br /><i>International Journal of Learning Technology, Vol. 4, No. 3/4 (2009) pp. 216 - 233</i><br />Affective reasoning holds significant potential for intelligent tutoring systems. Incorporating affective reasoning into pedagogical decision-making capabilities could enable learning environments to create customised experiences that are dynamically tailored to individual students' ever-changing levels of engagement, interest, motivation and self-efficacy. Because physiological responses are directly triggered by changes in affect, biofeedback data such as heart rate and galvanic skin response can be used to infer affective changes in conjunction with the situational context. This article explores an approach to inducing affect models for a learning environment. The inductive approach is examined for the task of modelling students' self-efficacy and empathy for companion agents. Together, these studies on affect in a narrative learning environment suggest that it is possible to build models of affective constructs from observations of the situational context and students' physiological response.</p>]]></content:encoded>
</item>
	
<rdf:Description rdf:ID="manifest">
	<mn:channels>
		<rdf:Seq>
			<rdf:li rdf:resource="http://www.journaltocs.ac.uk/api/" />
		</rdf:Seq>
	</mn:channels>
</rdf:Description>
	
</rdf:RDF>

 
 
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