JournalTOCs Blog

News and Opinions about current awareness on new research

An OpenRefine service created with the JournalTOCs API

without comments

Ted Lawless has developed an OpenRefine reconciliation service for academic journals that queries the JournalTOCs API and translates the response to the format that OpenRefine is expecting.

OpenRefine (ex-Google Refine) is a powerful tool for working with big data, cleaning it, transforming it from one format into another, extending it with web services, and exploring large data sets with ease.

JournalTOC API is a RESTful web service that can provide access to the full dataset collected by the JournalTOCs Project since 2009. This dataset contains the metadata for over 22,000 journals and for more than two millions of articles published during that span of time.

Ted has used the RDF Refine extension for OpenRefine to link local data stored in VIVO as RDF with other sources on the Web. OpenRefine allowed him to query a reconciliation service to match local strings to entities from another source and the RDF Extension enabled him to export those entities as RDF.

Basically Ted wanted to interlink the metadata describing the work of university researchers with the venues in which their research is published. Because JournalTOCs is a good source of metadata about academic journals and articles, he used a demo reconciliation service developed by Michael Stephens as a model, and put together a basic reconciliation service for the JournalTOC data that queries the JournalTOC API and translates the response to the format that OpenRefine is expecting. This service can be run locally and OpenRefine will query it just fine. Ted has open sourced his code and it is available on Github and it looks like a good option for librarians and researchers working with similar data sets.

Developers can use the JournalTOCs API to embed JournalTOCs’ metadata and search functionality within their own web services. Anyone with access to RSS Readers can also benefit from the JournalTOCs API. Most of JournalTOCs API calls are free and only require a simple registration process. The API responses are returned in RSS 1.0 format, which then you can parse and use in your own web application, RSS reader or institutional web page. Further information on JournalTOCS API can be found here.

More Information on OpenRefine and JournalTOCs:

Written by santy

December 7th, 2013 at 3:10 pm